Dremel Trio ... sufficient tool? - Page 2 - diyAudio
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Old 26th September 2012, 03:42 PM   #11
imagios is offline imagios  Czech Republic
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I was looking around what I could get and for the money I fond this "no-name" brand Tooltime :: Product : X093 POWER PLUS ROUTER 1500W VARIABLE SPEED (INCL 12 BITS)
I could get it from Germany for 90Eur.
It has variable speed and seems to have a finetune adjust. Even a case and few drills...
It seems to miss the power consistency unit that have the more expensive BOSH units, that controlles the constant RPMs, but I get I could miss that.
The next issue seems to be the vibrations, I have no Idea how much the thing vibrates, and how noisy it gets.
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Old 26th September 2012, 04:05 PM   #12
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Look it up on Google and see the specs and reviews for it. Most vibration comes from the bit being unbalanced (rare for good and okay bits), the collet coming all lose from being old (they can get loose over time, but more age and abuse), or the bearings inside (rare because they should be built to last). I was told that if all is good, "router chatter" (in 1/4 inch bits, less in the thicker 1/2 inch shanks) is a small problem and that I should seat the bit as deeply as it will go for the work and tool, and adjust the depth of the plunge on the router plunger.

Also check out the router's specs to see if this is the right size for you to use. The power compensator thing in the Bosch is nice to have, but all you have to do is back off and let the tool's RPMs catch up with your movement down and around the stock you are working on -- my Ryobi in the router table winds down when I start, but a smooth gliding push with just enough pressure makes it just as good as my Bosch (and I don't miss it one bit because I know what to expect from the cheap Ryobi -- my cost for the Ryobi was free, but you can find the my same model on sale for $65).

But before you buy, check out the Youtube videos on using a router. See if it is right tool for you to be using. None of my other friends know how to use a router (or router table) if their life depended on it and would probably burn the wood or do something worse to their hands. If you think that this is the way you want to go, then sure. Also, see if there are any courses on using a router at your college or school nearby at night. They will teach you all about speed versus bit size versus wood type and you will not burn mark any wood and save a lot of headache. Or again, there are probably "Learn how to use a Router this way and that way" videos on Youtube.

I have not met a router that is not noisy or have a high pitched cat stuck in a vacuum cleaner whine (again, Youtube and turn up the volume). They are all noisy, so yes ear muffs or plugs and goggles and do it outside on the balcony because of dust.

Last edited by overtheairbroadcast; 26th September 2012 at 04:09 PM. Reason: 1/2 inch, not 3/8 inch... I forgot the other popular shank size
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Old 26th September 2012, 04:13 PM   #13
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Whoops, in my haste and not owning the other popular sized router in North America, I need to correct myself.

It is 1/2 inch and NOT 3/8 inch as I had posted previously in #10. Mostly because I own 1/4 inch routers and 1/4 inch bits, my world has a limited view. My apologies for any confusion this may have caused.
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Old 26th September 2012, 04:56 PM   #14
imagios is offline imagios  Czech Republic
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thanks a lot for the advice, it seems I will have to find someone experienced here to show me the basics
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Old 26th September 2012, 07:43 PM   #15
macboy is offline macboy  Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overtheairbroadcast View Post
...Now we would have used the Dremel with some of my spare roter bits i had for the Bosch, but the problem with the Dremel was that it uses a proprietary smaller sized diameter bit and doesn't take the 1/4 inch standard bits. So that was something we did not expect (and had my friend known, he would have thought twice about it), so if you get the Dremel, you have to buy Dremel bits.
...
Dremel rotary tools use 1/8" shank bits. They are definitely not proprietary to Dremel, and many compatible bits can be found at very inexpensive prices.
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Old 26th September 2012, 07:50 PM   #16
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Ahhh... That is what I thought too at the time. But it turns out that the Dremel Trio uses 3/16 inch shank size and not the 1/8 inch (believe me, we tried but I left that out of the story). 1/8 inch is Rotozip and a whole bunch of others like the regular Dremel, Craftsman, Mastercraft (being Canadian we all know Mastercraft), etc. tools.


This note about the Trio's uniqueness is also plastered all over Dremel's Official website when you look at the Trio accessory list:

"Note: The Dremel Trio uses only Trio accessories. Dremel rotary tool accessories are not compatible with the Trio tool."
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Old 28th September 2012, 05:45 AM   #17
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I hate to be the one here to spoil the fun, but IMHO, woodworking as a hobby is a bad choice for someone living in a small urban apartment (flat). You'll need to haul sheet of wood up and down stairs. Do you have a means to get plywood from the store to your house? In Prague? Routers make more sawdust than you could imagine which will get everywhere, and sanding makes a very fine dust which will coat everything in your home, and clog up your air filters. How's your ventilation? Most stains, varnishes, thinners, brush cleaners etc . . . emit harmful fumes. Maybe you could do the work outside? But what a hassle!

If you really love DIY audio, I recommend building yourself electronic stuff, like amplifiers, preamps, X-overs, D/A converters etc . . . It takes a lot less space, a let fewer tools (soldering iron, multimeter, and an assortment of small hand tools). It's quiet and not messy. Putting your creation into a nice aluminum enclosure usually requires a hand drill, some tin snips, and maybe a "nibbler" (RadioShack HT-204 Nibbling Tool : Hobby & Do-It-Yourself | RadioShack.com).

Incidentally, the only thing I use my Dremmel router for is countersinking drivers 4mm at most. I cut holes with a jigsaw.

-Byron
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Old 28th September 2012, 10:42 AM   #18
imagios is offline imagios  Czech Republic
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the main reason for the router is the idea of building own speaker boxes, so no big immense of wood working, cutting a hole, working the edges.
The only place I can do it is the kitchen that can be closed by the doors and has nothing inside that could be harmed...
I already build a hi-fi table there, but that was more drilling holes .... so I hope some small stuff can be done there. Outside the flat is unfortunately no option, neighbors would be a problem.
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Old 28th September 2012, 08:53 PM   #19
imagios is offline imagios  Czech Republic
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I found this Makita quite good priced ...
what do you think? Since Makita is at least a brand with some good reputation
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Old 28th September 2012, 10:01 PM   #20
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Makita is a well respected brand here in Canada and are just above the middle when it comes to price for similar tools from other brands. I've only had one Makita though (a small VSR drill and as usual I got it on sale) so I can't speak for their whole line, but they are pretty tough if my little drill is any indication.

But like I said before, will it do what you want it to do? Is it something you want to get into? Can you handle it? Have you checked out the various instructional videos on Youtube? Checked out the cost of all the bits? How much will you use? Because if you are going to make a hobby of this and make a dozen pairs of speakers, then great.

You still have to factor in the cost of a few clamps (you will use them for gluing also), a good and relatively thick enough straight edge (so the router base can ride along it), hearing protection, safety glasses, and a vacuum cleaner.

My distant uncle in Hong Kong does woodworking, makes very simple boxes with good joinery, makes his own speakers (which he always ends up selling or giving as presents to his realtive's kids when they marry), and refreshes one or two old tube amplifiers now and then with new caps, components, and adds wood sides (but if he can't add wood, then little interest). His living space is about 75 square meters. He has an old fixed base silver coloured router older than me, an equally old variable speed drill, and a newish circular saw as power tools. And add in the vacuum, bits and blades, hammer, screwdrivers, good supply supply of clamps, clamping table, and chisels. All of this fits into a closet and you can't tell the spare former bedroom was other than a hobby room (don't look at the battle scarred floor). The walls are extra thick with concrete, so all the noise only can go through his front door and the windows. I think that I am in paradise with all the space I have, but he says he wouldn't have it any other way as he says it saves him money from buying too much wood (I found out that you can buy standard wood stock in Hong Kong cut to approximate lengths and pay a small premium for JUST that much stock) and too many more tools. My aunt has her TV, radio, her couch, knitting, and her stove -- I think that she is the reason why he doesn't have more tools.

He has slowed down after seeing the kits available out there (he had bought the SEAS Idunn kit and was shocked at how good the workmaship could be for a mass produced kit). I am still waiting for a full range or a folded horn, but he said I have to come and get it because he won't ship it.

The point is, if he can do it, with a lot of dedication you can too.
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