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-   -   more soldering help please (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/equipment-tools/15930-more-soldering-help-please.html)

theChris 2nd June 2003 06:03 AM

more soldering help please
 
ok, i've improved at soldering since last time, turns out the major problem was that i didn't put nay pressure on the lead and board at the same time.

in any case, now i have a problem. i have one of those radioshack pre-punched boards with the grid of holes with copper squares. so i found that i need to connect them, however solder seems to not want to bond to the solder in the other holes, but only to one hole. so how can i make tracks or such. just keep adding solder until it just piles over? i hope this question is clear.

jleaman 2nd June 2003 06:28 AM

if you do what you said buy adding lots of solder you will burn the board and the pads will fall off. you need to use wire to join them go get some solid stran wire and use that. i like cat5 cable .. the same stuff used for computer networking that is cheap and will work good for you..

theChris 3rd June 2003 08:44 AM

ok, and how is this done? the wire doens't stick to the board until i solder it, and i can't solder it until the wire's in place.

ah nevermind. just mad. i hate soldering so much. i'm about ready to throw out my new soldering iron, i hate it more then the cheap radioshack iron i have with a spherically dull tip.

Netlist 3rd June 2003 09:30 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally posted by theChris
ok, and how is this done? the wire doens't stick to the board until i solder it, and i can't solder it until the wire's in place.

ah nevermind. just mad. i hate soldering so much. i'm about ready to throw out my new soldering iron, i hate it more then the cheap radioshack iron i have with a spherically dull tip.

Hi, Chris
http://www.passdiy.com/howto/soldering.htm and http://www.passdiy.com/projects/pearlono4.htm give a nice explanation.

Like everything in life, good tools will do half the job. Unfortunately, they are expensive. From what I read in your posts, you spend too much money on crappy tools. (No offence)
300į is not hot enough to make good joints when soldering wires and bigger components.
For the smt parts it is usually fine. Donít be afraid to warm up things a bit. For normal components, count 1 to 3 seconds to heat up. For big wires, it can take up to 10-15 seconds.

Better buy good stuff, my Weller soldering iron is almost 20 years old, is on all day long, and all I had to replace was the tips on a regular basis and one time the cable.
Make sure you buy good solder too. A few threads here cover the issue. Remember also that a good joint is first of all a good mechanical connection between parts. A good solder joint has just enough solder to keep things together. Always keep the tip of your iron clean as well.
The picture shows a lot of good solderings and one bad. Too much solder and not enough heat to let the solder melt.

/Hugo

Netlist 3rd June 2003 09:36 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Good and bad mechanical connection:

theChris 3rd June 2003 08:09 PM

ok, i'll try a higher temperature. the iron has features i do like and is otherwise nice. maby i just had the temperature set too low. i have no idea how hot the normal 20 watt or 25 watt irons get as the hand test quickly fails... j/k on that hand test part.

ok, really, most of my mistakes look just odd. not like the too much solder ball, nor the good connection, but just goofy.

I think i'll go and buy a few more boards for this, and for a power supply regulator so i can run stuff inside.

Netlist 3rd June 2003 08:36 PM

Glad you see things in a more positive way. Practice a lot. :nod:

/Hugo

nobody special 3rd June 2003 08:39 PM

I soldered every day for 8 years, up until a couple years ago when I took a computer job. This included a lot of pc board work- replacing IC's, etc.- general Electronic tech stuff. I would say that the best thing you can do is to get a good HOT iron with a tip that is as big as possible without being too difficult to work with. I have never in my experience had a problem with overheating a component with too hot of an iron. Likewise with PCB's... If the board is worth using, it will generally stay together with a little heat. I have found that a good hot iron will allow you to get in and out quicker with less chance of a cold joint. I always recommend going as hot as possible, unless you have a notoriously fragile component.
Always make sure that you have a damp (not wet) sponge, and keep the iron clean! Tin it <I>as it is warming up </I> with your solder. I like to melt a little solder now and then while I'm working on the tip of the iron, and kind of "fling" it off., and then wipe it on the sponge. This gets what I think of as "dead" solder off of the iron (solder seems to lose its ability to form a good joint when it has been repeatedly heated... maybe a flux thing?). In fact, this can work well when you are having a hard time getting a good joint. Try getting some of the solder off the board with the iron, fling it off the iron, and then resolder with "fresh" solder.
More than anything, keep practicing. You will catch onto your own technique.
Steve

tiroth 3rd June 2003 09:02 PM

In fact it is generally a GOOD thing that the solder won't cross the pads easily...keeps the mistakes down. The high surface tension means it tries to "stick" to metal that it can bond. It will avoid the fiberglass/phenolic resin that the board is made of.

What I do when put together veroboard circuits is use small pieces of wire, bent and inserted into the holes so there is a good mechanical connection. Then I solder. Relying on the solder itself to bridge conductors is a bad idea both mechically and electrically.

Another thing you can do is use the excess from your component leads to build your tracks. You should still solder the lead to the board at the component, because it fixes it mechanically and prevents vibration from exploiting a lever-action down the length of the lead.

Finally, be EXTREMELY careful when you make your connections. I have a hard time with spatial relationships and tend to make mistakes when I flip the board back and forth.

karma 3rd June 2003 10:08 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by nobody special
I soldered every day for 8 years, up until a couple years ago when I took a computer job. This included a lot of pc board work- replacing IC's, etc.- general Electronic tech stuff. I would say that the best thing you can do is to get a good HOT iron with a tip that is as big as possible without being too difficult to work with. I have never in my experience had a problem with overheating a component with too hot of an iron. Likewise with PCB's... If the board is worth using, it will generally stay together with a little heat. I have found that a good hot iron will allow you to get in and out quicker with less chance of a cold joint. I always recommend going as hot as possible, unless you have a notoriously fragile component.
Always make sure that you have a damp (not wet) sponge, and keep the iron clean! Tin it &lt;I&gt;as it is warming up &lt;/I&gt; with your solder. I like to melt a little solder now and then while I'm working on the tip of the iron, and kind of &quot;fling&quot; it off., and then wipe it on the sponge. This gets what I think of as &quot;dead&quot; solder off of the iron (solder seems to lose its ability to form a good joint when it has been repeatedly heated... maybe a flux thing?). In fact, this can work well when you are having a hard time getting a good joint. Try getting some of the solder off the board with the iron, fling it off the iron, and then resolder with &quot;fresh&quot; solder.
More than anything, keep practicing. You will catch onto your own technique.
Steve

this is the right way and dont over heat the traces or thay peal off
that sucks


;) dont forget a good solder sucker


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