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Old 29th November 2011, 03:42 AM   #11
cliffyk is offline cliffyk  United States
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Earlier this year Joel at ScopemeterRepair.com repaired and calibrated my old 105 for $250...
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Old 22nd December 2011, 01:55 PM   #12
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Default My 199 ScopeMeter has a vertical line on the LCD

I see plenty of references to horizontal lines but my 199 has a vertical line about 1/8" wide near the right side of the LCD.

Any suggestions on that being caused by the same issue? Seems reasonable but, as is typical with me, my problems are inevitably non-standard.
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Old 7th January 2012, 06:17 PM   #13
hugos31 is offline hugos31  Argentina
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my fluke 196C presents horizontal lines, because moisture wing
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Old 8th January 2012, 08:48 PM   #14
hugos31 is offline hugos31  Argentina
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Click the image to open in full size. Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 30th March 2012, 01:29 PM   #15
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I realize this is an old thread but I am having the same problem with my 199.
I would love to just send it to Joel but I live in S.A. so this is not an option.

I got the screen out and undid the metal frame clips and lifted it gently. I can see the ribbon cable but can't "unfold" it to get a better view. The metal frame seems bonded to the glass so this is where I chickened out.

Any additional hints would be appreciated.

Clinton
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Old 26th July 2012, 06:06 PM   #16
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Default Fluke Scopemeter 196 B/W Screen Repair w/better Grammer

Disclaimer: If you try this and it does not work… It is not my fault….

Last night I said what the heck and jumped in to see if I could fix my Fluke 196 Scopemeter’s B/W screen...

This is how I did it...

First

Be clean keep fingers off all plastic and glass you have to look through… not heeding this will cause you to redo things a little care would have prevented..

Remove the battery when working with your scope.

There are 12 screws torx/flat blade... Two for the top cover, two for the bottom cover, two to split the case, 2 holding the scope frame to the front half of the scope case (shell) and 4 holding the display in. Not bad.

Ok so the Horizontal lines of the display are connected by the infamous “glued” ribbon cable and the vertical lines are connected to an elastomeric connector.

Do not disconnect any ribbon cables you want to be able to turn on the meter apart to test your work.

Flip the main chassis so that the display is sitting in its half of the case on the left side that puts the main board with the rest of the scope sitting on the right side.
I used a mouse pad placed over the main board frame so at a later time I can flip the display on the main board and power up the meter while apart.

I have read in the past that the elastomeric connector for an LCD is not alignment critical… that is not true…. think about how they work it will come up later.

On the back of the display there are 13 twist tabs that hold a glass and metal frame over the display providing the alignment and pressure needed to keep everything connected….

Carefully align the twist tabs to their respective slots… then supporting the frame flip the display board over onto the mouse pad and gently lift up on the frame… This is where you need to keep things clean (don’t touch anything that you can see through or make sure you go back with a micro fiber cloth and clean your finger prints off).

Inside the frame there are two very thin and possibly fragile strips of isolating rubber these are located inside the metal frame… watch out for them they may fall out, if they do I used an xacto blade to maneuver them into their original position… (I did not want to touch them)….

I started off with missing horizontal lines in my display (7 to be exact).. Researching this you may have read about people using glue guns without glue sticks to heat the ribbon cable, or soldering irons…

The heat source I chose was a small travel iron. With the tabbed frame off the ribbon cable is accessible at both the display and daughter board connection points. The travel iron inspired me because the temperature can be controlled, the heating surface is flat and you can carefully control the amount of pressure you exert….
I set the iron at its highest heat setting waited till it reached temperature and carefully ironed the ribbon cable… I ironed and cooled the cable 4 times over about 20 seconds….

Next I tested my work before I put it all together. I placed the tabed frame over the display, I plugged in the battery and carefully pushed the on button on the scope (don’t press the on button too hard because it is held in place with the pressure of the main board frame…).

Now press on the frame to see if the horizontal lines are gone.. You are simulating all those twist tabs… so think about how much pressure they may exert and remember the back end of the display is being pressed against the frame of the main board (thus the soft rubber mouse pad suggested above) so don’t overdo it…

If everything went well and you press the frame in a way that that simulates the tabs you will see the display the display clean on black bars…

If not try more careful ironing…

I did mention that I started out with horizontal lines… at this point I pressed the frame down and could see that I fixed the horizontal lines but in the middle of the screen I now had a vertical line… aaaghh… The vertical lines of the display are controlled by the elastomeric connector…

What I did now was probably not necessary and probably dangerous but I took a Q-tip dipped it in some good grade alcohol and wiped the elastomeric connector and the daughter board lands once (thinking it was somehow dirty).

What I think was really happening was I had not pushed the display over far enough to make proper alignment…

Next I pushed the display over toward the ribbon cable (you just ironed)… after doing this I once again placed the LCD frame over the display and pressed down on it in a way to simulate the pressure exerted by the twist tabs and verified everything was working and that the vertical line had disappeared. They did..


Take the battery out.

Next step flip the daughter board over holding the fame so it does not drop off and twist the tabs… cross the tabs when you twist them (top right, bottom left, top left, bottom right etc)…

Next replace the four screws for the display and recheck your work…. See how the display looks. If all is good reverse assemble the 8 remaining screws and remember the hand strap….

This worked for me I hope it works out for you. Good luck

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Old 7th February 2013, 02:06 AM   #17
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Im having the same issue with my fluke 196. So in a nutshell the horizontal cable is not making the proper connection and needs to be reseated. In order to reseat the cable need to heat the glue that secures the horizontal cable and position the cable properly. Is this correct?
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Old 7th March 2013, 04:08 PM   #18
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Yes, what happens is the adhesive that holds the ribbon cable fails and the ribbon breaks contact… Why fluke built the display that way probably was a manufacturing decision vs good design… But when you iron it you melt the glue and if successful reconnect all the leads….
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Old 11th April 2013, 09:40 AM   #19
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by tflynn6693 View Post
Disclaimer: If you try this and it does not work… It is not my fault….

Last night I said what the heck and jumped in to see if I could fix my Fluke 196 Scopemeter’s B/W screen...

This is how I did it...

First
Be clean keep fingers off all plastic and glass you have to look through… not heeding this will cause you to redo things a little care would have prevented..

Remove the battery when working with your scope.

There are 12 screws torx/flat blade... Two for the top cover, two for the bottom cover, two to split the case, 2 holding the scope frame to the front half of the scope case (shell) and 4 holding the display in. Not bad.

Ok so the Horizontal lines of the display are connected by the infamous “glued” ribbon cable and the vertical lines are connected to an elastomeric connector.

Do not disconnect any ribbon cables you want to be able to turn on the meter apart to test your work.
Flip the main chassis so that the display is sitting in its half of the case on the left side that puts the main board with the rest of the scope sitting on the right side.
I used a mouse pad placed over the main board frame so at a later time I can flip the display on the main board and power up the meter while apart.

I have read in the past that the elastomeric connector for an LCD is not alignment critical… that is not true…. think about how they work it will come up later.

On the back of the display there are 13 twist tabs that hold a glass and metal frame over the display providing the alignment and pressure needed to keep everything connected….

Carefully align the twist tabs to their respective slots… then supporting the frame flip the display board over onto the mouse pad and gently lift up on the frame… This is where you need to keep things clean (don’t touch anything that you can see through or make sure you go back with a micro fiber cloth and clean your finger prints off).

Inside the frame there are two very thin and possibly fragile strips of isolating rubber these are located inside the metal frame… watch out for them they may fall out, if they do I used an xacto blade to maneuver them into their original position… (I did not want to touch them)….

I started off with missing horizontal lines in my display (7 to be exact).. Researching this you may have read about people using glue guns without glue sticks to heat the ribbon cable, or soldering irons…
The heat source I chose was a small travel iron. With the tabbed frame off the ribbon cable is accessible at both the display and daughter board connection points. The travel iron inspired me because the temperature can be controlled, the heating surface is flat and you can carefully control the amount of pressure you exert….
I set the iron at its highest heat setting waited till it reached temperature and carefully ironed the ribbon cable… I ironed and cooled the cable 4 times over about 20 seconds….

Next I tested my work before I put it all together. I placed the tabed frame over the display, I plugged in the battery and carefully pushed the on button on the scope (don’t press the on button too hard because it is held in place with the pressure of the main board frame…).

Now press on the frame to see if the horizontal lines are gone.. You are simulating all those twist tabs… so think about how much pressure they may exert and remember the back end of the display is being pressed against the frame of the main board (thus the soft rubber mouse pad suggested above) so don’t overdo it…

If everything went well and you press the frame in a way that that simulates the tabs you will see the display the display clean on black bars…

If not try more careful ironing…

I did mention that I started out with horizontal lines… at this point I pressed the frame down and could see that I fixed the horizontal lines but in the middle of the screen I now had a vertical line… aaaghh… The vertical lines of the display are controlled by the elastomeric connector…

What I did now was probably not necessary and probably dangerous but I took a Q-tip dipped it in some good grade alcohol and wiped the elastomeric connector and the daughter board lands once (thinking it was somehow dirty).

What I think was really happening was I had not pushed the display over far enough to make proper alignment…
Next I pushed the display over toward the ribbon cable (you just ironed)… after doing this I once again placed the LCD frame over the display and pressed down on it in a way to simulate the pressure exerted by the twist tabs and verified everything was working and that the vertical line had disappeared. They did..


Take the battery out.

Next step flip the daughter board over holding the fame so it does not drop off and twist the tabs… cross the tabs when you twist them (top right, bottom left, top left, bottom right etc)…

Next replace the four screws for the display and recheck your work…. See how the display looks. If all is good reverse assemble the 8 remaining screws and remember the hand strap….

This worked for me I hope it works out for you. Good luck
Thanks, Great DIY!!! about the ironing, what was the apprex temp or on wich temp. range (wool,etc..) ? is there a risk to damage the riboon cable ?
Thanks again
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Old 18th April 2013, 05:39 PM   #20
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I just put the iron on cotton
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