Soldering Saftey - Page 3 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Equipment & Tools

Equipment & Tools From test equipment to hand tools

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 18th January 2003, 12:05 PM   #21
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Zamboanga, City of Flowers, Mindanao
Send a message via Yahoo to Elso Kwak
Unhappy Arsenic in the Flux???

Quote:
Originally posted by Apogee
The solder is not the issue...

The arsenic is in the flux...

Research it... the stuff is nasty but sure works well!!!

No rat poison here (although she does have designs on my shop space so I wonder????)
Hi Apogee,
Do you have proof, by chemical analysis, that the arsenic is in the flux? Is it put in by purpose or is it a contamination?
I find your experience/exposure VERY disturbing!
Will try a Google search for the wordcombination Arsenic/flux.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th January 2003, 12:46 PM   #22
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Zamboanga, City of Flowers, Mindanao
Send a message via Yahoo to Elso Kwak
Default Arsenic in Solder Formulations

Hi,
I found this one :
http://www.warton-metals.co.uk/analysis.htm
and
http://www.saletek.com/solder_analysis.htm
and
http://www.qualitek.com/products/barsolder&wire.htm
Leadfree solder to minimise leadexposure:
http://www.northwestern.edu/research...03leadfree.htm
and
http://www.redringsolder.com/rx_series.html
This is a alarming report of solderpaste causing Arsenic poisioning:
http://neuro-www.mgh.harvard.edu/for...strialArs.html
Composition of Ersin solder:
http://www.aircraftmaterialsuk.com/d...nic/erzin.html

Concluding the solder itself contains some 0.04 % Arsenic among other impurities. Trace elements in the flux are not characterized. The lead seems also to be a healthhazard. That's why the leadfree solder comes in.
Steve, you are probably right the arsenic might come from the flux.
Thanks again for the warning and I will exercise utmost care in soldering.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th January 2003, 02:10 PM   #23
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
diyAudio Member
 
peranders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Göteborg, Sweden
Blog Entries: 4
Default Re: Soldering Saftey

Quote:
Originally posted by RobPhill33
I have always known that inhaling the solder vapour was bad for you, but lately I have heard that it can lead to many different problems that I didn't know about. Currently I don't use any respiratory protect and I was wondering if any else does?
I'm aware of that we have different regulations in working environment. I Sweden we would NEVER accept conditions like in India, Thailand, Tawian. Those who sits all day long soldering have ventilaton and fume evacuation. I read recently on my tin roll. Lead isn't safe..... wash your hands etc. etc.

Hobby soldering is not very hazardous I think.
__________________
/Per-Anders (my first name) or P-A as my friends call me
Super Regulator SSR03 Group buy
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th January 2003, 02:12 PM   #24
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
diyAudio Member
 
peranders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Göteborg, Sweden
Blog Entries: 4
Quote:
Originally posted by Apogee
The solder is not the issue...The arsenic is in the flux...

Research it... the stuff is nasty but sure works well!!!
I find this also very . Is this just a rumour or can you dig up something?
__________________
/Per-Anders (my first name) or P-A as my friends call me
Super Regulator SSR03 Group buy
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th January 2003, 12:36 PM   #25
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Send a message via MSN to SkinnyBoy
Default Re: Re: Soldering Saftey

Quote:
Originally posted by peranders


Lead isn't safe..... wash your hands etc. etc.

Hobby soldering is not very hazardous I think.
Thats why I am trying to get out of the habbit of holding the solder in my mouth... I think it would be easier to just get lead free solder...
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th January 2003, 01:37 PM   #26
dhaen is offline dhaen  Europe
diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
 
dhaen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: U.K.
Default Lead free solder

Quote:
I think it would be easier to just get lead free solder...
You can try it if you want. But you won't like it.
Unless you can get the conditions exactly right (such as controlled production conditions), the joints you make will be inferior.

I used to do things like hold solder in my mouth, strip insulation with my teeth etc.
Later in life, you wonder if your "condition" has anything to do with the stupidity of your youth.

Cheers,
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th January 2003, 03:37 PM   #27
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: New Hampshire, USA
Default Homebrew Fume Extractor

Quote:
Originally posted by kropf
Everything I've seen so far (except moving outside to solder) recirculates the air into the same room.

A slightly more expensive option is to pick up a bathroom exhaust fan and mount it on a 5-sided plywood box (made with scrap) with the box opening facing your work area. Connect the exhaust with some flexible dryer-vent tubing out through a window. Home Depot has a model that sells for less than $13 in my neighborhood. Total DIY exhaust hood project cost: less than $25.

Sorry, no pictures.

Jeremy

Disclaimer: I make no guarantees on the effectiveness or legality of this or any other approach to ventilation.
I did exactly this a few years ago - got 3 cheap surplus fans, some dryer vent hose and fittings, and a little scrap lumber. I run it off a surplus 12V power supply. The wood piece on top in the photo fits nicely into a nearby window which gets shut on top of it. The exhaust grate keeps birds from nesting in it, etc. (recommended). The unit is a bit noisy, but sucks everything out of the area.

If you build one like this, I wouldn't use it around solvents and other inflamables - especially if you don't use brushless fans. For soldering, it works great, though.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg extractor.jpg (20.8 KB, 115 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th January 2003, 03:55 PM   #28
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Default Re: Lead free solder

Quote:
Originally posted by dhaen

You can try it if you want. But you won't like it.
Unless you can get the conditions exactly right (such as controlled production conditions), the joints you make will be inferior.
What are these problems? As you might remember we had a
number of threads discussing solders a while back. It is true that
lead-free solders for non-industrial usage have a higher melting
point than lead-based solders, but otherwise I cannot remember
any of us finding any information on problems directly related to
lead vs. lead-free.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th January 2003, 04:07 PM   #29
dhaen is offline dhaen  Europe
diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
 
dhaen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: U.K.
Quote:
What are these problems?
In my (and my colleagues) experience, it does not flow as well as convential 60/40 types.
Difficult to solder items, such as components that have been in stock for a while, need to be cleaned, where normally it would be unnecessary.
Some components, such as switches, where the terminal is made of the same material as the switch interior, refuse to tin altogether.
Also, the joints often look dull, leading you to think they are dry(cold).

Sorry I didn't get involved too much in the original thread, but if I remember rightly, it digressed into what solder "sounds" best. All my types make a similar "clunk" when they hit the floor.

Cheers,
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th January 2003, 04:38 PM   #30
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Quote:
Originally posted by dhaen

In my (and my colleagues) experience, it does not flow as well as convential 60/40 types.
Difficult to solder items, such as components that have been in stock for a while, need to be cleaned, where normally it would be unnecessary.
Some components, such as switches, where the terminal is made of the same material as the switch interior, refuse to tin altogether.
Also, the joints often look dull, leading you to think they are dry(cold).

Sorry I didn't get involved too much in the original thread, but if I remember rightly, it digressed into what solder "sounds" best. All my types make a similar "clunk" when they hit the floor.

Cheers,
OK, wetting might be an issue. I bought lead-free solder recently
but haven't had much time to really try it yet. As for joints being
grey, often indicating cold joints, has nothing to do with the
lead, but whether the alloy is eutectic or not. An alloy is eutectic
if it has a sharp phase transition from liquid to solid. Ordinary
60/40 solder is not eutectic, while 63/37 is, so 60/40 is not a
good choice if you want to avoid cold joints, 63/37 being a
better choice in this respect. There are also lead-free alloys
which are eutectic, so this has nothing to do with the lead itself.
Just as in the previous threads, I still remain puzzled, though, as
to why there is so much 60/40 solder around when 63/37 seems
to be a better choice according to all information I have managed
to find. Could it be that 60/40 has better wetting properties,
perhaps?

You also mentioned a need for cleaning components before
soldering. I wonder it that has anything to do with the lead?
I would rather think it depends on what type of flux is used,
many lead-free solders having "more ecological" fluxes, which
may not be as good.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Electrical Saftey and a ground loop ccdoggy Parts 7 21st January 2008 06:43 AM
soldering DIY IC rnzr Everything Else 2 24th March 2005 04:00 PM
more soldering help please theChris Equipment & Tools 22 5th June 2003 04:07 PM
On Soldering vpharris Equipment & Tools 9 23rd April 2003 06:14 PM
Soldering to-363 PCP Solid State 1 18th January 2003 12:30 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 10:05 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2