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Old 11th December 2013, 10:27 AM   #21
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Pooge, he stated that +/-22 is the limit for opamps. Since one opamp is used per rail, this tells you that for each rail you can go nearly as high as the maximum opamp supply voltage. You don't want to go higher, not to damage the opamp.

So if each opamp can handle a 44V rail to rail voltage, this means that each rail should comfortably give you around 40V. Two rails of 40V equals +/-40V.
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Old 11th December 2013, 12:11 PM   #22
pooge is offline pooge  United States
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Ok, that clears it up. Thanks.
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Old 11th December 2013, 01:51 PM   #23
EUVL is offline EUVL  Europe
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Jan,

PR2201 can do 80V. JFET input on top.

PR2201 / PR2202 80V OP-Amp, High Voltage Op Amp

But I think you might not like the noise figures.


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Old 12th December 2013, 10:49 AM   #24
UMarcus is offline UMarcus  Germany
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Stupid Question, : What are the maximal output current of the regulator ?
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Old 12th December 2013, 10:59 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EUVL View Post
Jan,

PR2201 can do 80V. JFET input on top.

PR2201 / PR2202 80V OP-Amp, High Voltage Op Amp

But I think you might not like the noise figures.


Patrick
Yes, also the BW and slew rate isn't that hot, and Iout is pretty low.

If you need more than say 40V from these regs, a good way is to hang a 3-pin reg off the output and supply the opamp from that.
Then again, also 3-pin regs have limited voltage range in absolute terms.
Or maybe just a zener in series with the opamp supply pin.
Haven't tried that though.

Jan
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Old 12th December 2013, 11:04 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UMarcus View Post
Stupid Question, : What are the maximal output current of the regulator ?
Not a stupid question, rather to the point.
I would say about 1 A. If you really want to go to such high currents, you probably want to select a high-Hfe pass transistor.
Also keep an eye on the dissipation - with 5V across the series transistor at 1A that's 5W. Check the degrees/watt figure of the heasink you use to avoid too much temp rise.
For instance, with a heatsink with 5 degree/W that 5 watt causes a 25 degrees temp rise. That's probably as high as you want to go, so a taller (lower degrees/W) heatsink would be better.

jan
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Old 12th December 2013, 11:04 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audiostrat View Post
Pooge, he stated that +/-22 is the limit for opamps. Since one opamp is used per rail, this tells you that for each rail you can go nearly as high as the maximum opamp supply voltage. You don't want to go higher, not to damage the opamp.

So if each opamp can handle a 44V rail to rail voltage, this means that each rail should comfortably give you around 40V. Two rails of 40V equals +/-40V.
Yes, thanks.
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Old 12th December 2013, 11:12 AM   #28
EUVL is offline EUVL  Europe
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> If you need more than say 40V from these regs, a good way is to hang a 3-pin reg off the output and supply the opamp from that.

Powering the opamp is one thing, and you can probably use a TL431-based shunt regulator plus a CRD for that.
The opamp output DC, on the other hand, has to be output voltage + 0.65V - startup-Zener voltage.
Are you prepared to use a high-voltage Zener there then ?

> What are the maximal output current of the regulator ?

Equal to the max. current of the opamp x hfe of the pass device ?
Assuming of course you have sufficient heat sinking and a powerful enough pass device.
You can of course use a (depletion) FET. They don't load the opamp so much.


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Last edited by EUVL; 12th December 2013 at 11:15 AM.
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Old 12th December 2013, 11:29 AM   #29
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EUVL View Post
..............................The opamp output DC, on the other hand, has to be output voltage + 0.65V - startup-Zener voltage..................
Can you expand on that?
I don't understand the statement as is.
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Old 12th December 2013, 11:49 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EUVL View Post
> If you need more than say 40V from these regs, a good way is to hang a 3-pin reg off the output and supply the opamp from that.

Powering the opamp is one thing, and you can probably use a TL431-based shunt regulator plus a CRD for that.
The opamp output DC, on the other hand, has to be output voltage + 0.65V - startup-Zener voltage.
Are you prepared to use a high-voltage Zener there then ? Patrick
Ohh yes; the voltage across the zener doesn't matter so its noise is largely irrelevant, and the current is controlled by the opamp anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EUVL View Post
>

> What are the maximal output current of the regulator ?

Equal to the max. current of the opamp x hfe of the pass device ?
Assuming of course you have sufficient heat sinking and a powerful enough pass device.
You can of course use a (depletion) FET. They don't load the opamp so much.


Patrick
Actually, you must first make sure that the current source has enough current to fully open the transistor at say 1A. Then you must make sure that the opamp can absorb that current for the no-load case.
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