Panasonic PT-L595U Retrofit - Page 2 - diyAudio
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Old 3rd October 2006, 07:48 PM   #11
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Location: london
look at izzotek.com they got good new bulbs that will go straight into your pj
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Old 14th October 2006, 03:58 AM   #12
Day2230 is offline Day2230  United States
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Interestingly enough, I just acquired one of these projectors as well, though mine is branded as a Polaroid Polaview 211E (same projector, different name).

Mine also has a blown bulb, so I'm wondering: How did you trick it into running without the bulb, mobius? I'd like to try my hand at replacing the bulb with something else too
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Old 14th October 2006, 03:25 PM   #13
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Default Tricking the projector

After taking the cover and front panel off, you will see two sets of wires running to the ballast for the bulb. The larger set is power, the smaller set is for control signals. There are three wires (5 volts, ground, and signal). I believe that the signal line is held at 5 volts with respect to the signal ground until the the bulb ignites, after that the signal line goes low. All I did was short the signal line to ground and the projector fired up and I could see the LCD come on (I shined a flashlight into the projector and looked in the lens). I'm not sure how safe shorting the signal line is for the control electronics in the long term, but that is how I did it.

Good Luck!
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Old 15th October 2006, 05:45 AM   #14
Day2230 is offline Day2230  United States
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Thank you! I will try this as soon as I have a chance to play with the projector again.
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Old 17th October 2006, 08:37 AM   #15
Day2230 is offline Day2230  United States
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Default Re: Tricking the projector

Quote:
Originally posted by mobius13
After taking the cover and front panel off, you will see two sets of wires running to the ballast for the bulb. The larger set is power, the smaller set is for control signals. There are three wires (5 volts, ground, and signal). I believe that the signal line is held at 5 volts with respect to the signal ground until the the bulb ignites, after that the signal line goes low. All I did was short the signal line to ground and the projector fired up and I could see the LCD come on (I shined a flashlight into the projector and looked in the lens). I'm not sure how safe shorting the signal line is for the control electronics in the long term, but that is how I did it.

Good Luck!
Good news over here! I managed to get it working following your instructions. Took a small piece of wire and shorted the pins on the end of the 3-pin cable itself, then taped it with electric tape so nothing else would short. Turned it on, and 5 seconds later it's happily running as though it had a bulb.

I'll try to get some photos taken soon to show everyone, but it might be a couple days -- I've got a fairly full schedule tomorrow.

By the way, mobius13, how is your retrofit project coming along? What kind of bulbs are you using/going to use?
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Old 14th November 2006, 09:54 AM   #16
Day2230 is offline Day2230  United States
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Sorry I haven't been around, everybody. College has been keeping me busy... But, that hasn't kept me from working on the projector. After I got the pin shorted out and tricked it into running with no bulb, I went ahead and looked into replacement bulbs.

Since I don't really have much money right now, I decided to go for a simple Halogen setup, keeping the original reflector and bulb cage. After looking for a while I decided on an EYB Bulb and socket (GY5.3 socket, if anyone is curious), because it would fit inside the original reflector and would be relatively inexpensive to maintain (also I was nervous about putting too powerful a halogen in this thing, knowing Halogens run hotter than Metal Halides...).

So after a bit of thinking, a spare PCI slot bracket, a dremel, electrical components, and a few hours of free time, I now have a fully working retrofitted projector!

I hooked my xbox up to it and I've been watching videos in Xbox Media Center and playing games for the past few days now.

It's not quite as bright as I had hoped for, and the color/contrast is a *little* off (probably due to the bulb being a halogen and the projector not being adjusted for this particular bulb) but for now I have 60 inches of picture for a total cost of $25 plus time!

I'll try to post pictures sometime this week so everyone can see what I did!

If anyone is curious about how to use these 82 volt halogens, you basically use a diode in series with the bulb to chop off half the AC waveform, which results in the voltage these guys are looking for. Of course this requires a pretty big diode, so I grabbed a large bridge rectifier from my local radioshack and only used 2 legs. I'm getting power to it through a computer power jack I grabbed out of an old power supply, and re-wired the old bulb cage power input connector to give out 120 volts. Everything is working fine so far!
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Old 21st December 2006, 07:59 PM   #17
Nostrum is offline Nostrum  United States
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First off, sorry for bumping such an old post, but I couldn't PM/email the people in this thread that could answer my question since I don't have enough posts yet.

Anyways, Day2230: would you mind posting those pictures or a more detailed list of instructions on getting the halogen bulb to work? I have the exact same projector and it's got a blown bulb. I shorted the 3-pin cable and the LCD comes on and works just fine. I'm a second year EE student, so I'm not a layman, but I don't know much about bulbs or projectors. So if you could post some details on how you adapted your halogen bulb to run in this projector, I would be most appreciative. I'm mostly worried about getting the old bulb out without destroying the harness, as well as electrocuting myself.

Thanks in advance!
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Old 17th January 2007, 09:10 PM   #18
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greidy78:

do you have any pics of the work you did? I can get a deal on the same pj and I do not want to pay $400 for a replacement bulb. Let me know. Thx

PS

How do like the pj? Any issues?
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Old 19th January 2007, 09:19 PM   #19
Nostrum is offline Nostrum  United States
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Could someone with enough posts please email Day2230 or greidy78 about this thread? Pretty please?
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Old 15th April 2007, 08:07 AM   #20
Day2230 is offline Day2230  United States
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Sorry everybody... I've been busy with classes and work and completely forgot about posting the pictures... I'll see if I can snap some pics of what I did in the next few days and get something uploaded.

The projector still works, though I switched over to an ENX halogen bulb after my first EYB died. The main reason was the hassle involved -- I ended up damaging my second bulb while inserting it into the reflector and decided I would try out a bulb with a built-in reflector. I was happy to find out that the screen was still decently lit even with the smaller diameter of the ENX's reflector.

What I did to run the Halogen in the projector was pretty basic, and could probably be improved upon. I cut the wires running from the MH ballast to the bulb cage, and re-routed the bulb cage connector to a 120V AC jack and switch I mounted to the side of the projector next to the bulb cage. I then hooked up the halogen bulb in series with a large diode (I used two legs of a bridge rectifier since that's what I had sitting around) inside the bulb cage in place of the old bulb and ran wires from that setup to the bulb cage connector.

I'd suggest heat-sinking the diode and using high temperature RTV silicone instead of electric tape because of the temperatures near the halogen.

In the future I'd like to use the logic signal that controlled the MH ballast to switch the halogen bulb, and hook into the main power connection to the projector instead of adding my own power jack and switch, but for now I'm happy with a working projector

Next up: Building/buying a component to VGA adapter so I can use my xbox in progressive scan mode! The composite video scaling/deinterlacing on this projector is a little bit icky sometimes... it seems like it just grabs 2 or 3 lines and uses them as the next few lines, leaving a sort of ripply effect in the picture. Also the color adjustment in composite video mode leaves a bit to be desired.

I'll try and get some photos soon though, everyone.
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