identifying and fixing a fried component? - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > General Interest > Everything Else > The Moving Image > DIY Projectors

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 28th September 2014, 07:06 AM   #1
blennus is offline blennus  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Default identifying and fixing a fried component?

So I managed to get my passive 3D projector up and running with the LG panel... but then I thought I'd adjust the screen on the fly... in doing so I must have caused the metal frame around the screen to touch the circuitry or something nearby and the whole thing just went dead... the monitor control panel no longer indicates anything is going to it. I'm hoping it is simply one of the components that got overloaded and that perhaps I can remove that and replace it with a new one (if I'm really luck perhaps I can even salvage the part from a previous monitor tear down).

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge of what may be the likely issue in this situation? I can provide an image of the circuit board if that will help. The capacitors all look fine, no visible bulging. The (I believe it's called the inductor) has what appears to be a yellowy orange resin like substance on all four sets of coils... might this be a sign it got overheated and failed? If so could I just replace this part and hope for it to work again?

Any suggestions or recommendations welcome (bar the typical "just get a new panel").

I continue to look for a replacement panel I'm just hoping that maybe I can salvage what I have.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2014, 07:23 AM   #2
blennus is offline blennus  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Quick update... the item I'm referring to looks very similar to the two items in the bottom right of this image with the blue squares to their rights.Click the image to open in full size.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2014, 07:31 AM   #3
blennus is offline blennus  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Yet another update... it may be the "transformer choke"... I'm not sure... I'm just hoping that it may be a valid possibility as to what may have been damaged in my little power zap and may hopefully be something I can replace?
Click the image to open in full size.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2014, 07:33 AM   #4
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
diyAudio Moderator
 
Mooly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
They are just chokes (inductors) and look to be on the supply input side. They will be fine.

If you shorted something out then its 99.999% certain that the damage is going to be failed semiconductors... and with it being a man made fault the failure won't be "logical". You will be looking for collateral damage as well.

Although nothing to do with the man made fault aspect, some of the caps (top right) do actually look as though the vents are lifting... unless its an effect of the photograph.

With the greatest of respect, I suspect this is going to be beyond your abilities. Maybe one to chalk up to experience.
__________________
-------------------------------------------------------
Installing and using LTspice. From beginner to advanced.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2014, 07:44 AM   #5
blennus is offline blennus  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooly View Post
They are just chokes (inductors) and look to be on the supply input side. They will be fine.

If you shorted something out then its 99.999% certain that the damage is going to be failed semiconductors... and with it being a man made fault the failure won't be "logical". You will be looking for collateral damage as well.

Although nothing to do with the man made fault aspect, some of the caps (top right) do actually look as though the vents are lifting... unless its an effect of the photograph.

With the greatest of respect, I suspect this is going to be beyond your abilities. Maybe one to chalk up to experience.
Thanks Mooly... I should have been more clear... these images aren't of my power board... I was just trying to find an image of a similar component (simply because I haven't put a picture of my actual component online anywhere to be able to link it)... Part of me does suspect this will be beyond my ability... but I'm happy to give it a go... at this point I can't really make it worse than it is in that I can't make it work at the moment anyway. I just know it took me a long time to source a 3D passive monitor and figured I've got bits from previous projects lying around (and a good electronics store nearby) so if it's a case of something can be replaced that will/may well fix the issue, I'm happy to give it a go.

Again really appreciate the response though, as someone with very little experience in the deep details of electrical engineering etc any help is always appreciated.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2014, 10:42 AM   #6
yajnaS is offline yajnaS  India
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Interesting how some components are at odd angles. The blue box capacitor in the lower middle and the four diodes to the left of the big central heatsinks - installed at odd angles.

Can machines insert components like that ? Or is this a manually stuffed board ?
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2014, 12:00 PM   #7
dmills is offline dmills  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: High Wycombe
Machines can insert parts like that, no problem.

The reason for the odd placement is probably to get away with a single sided board while still meeting clearences required for safety approval.

The single sided board with wire links aparently makes for a lower BOM cost then the same thing double sided would.

Regards, Dan.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2014, 01:33 PM   #8
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
diyAudio Moderator
 
Mooly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
You would need to come up with a circuit diagram to stand any real chance of fixing this.

You might get lucky and find there is a CP (circuit protector) or a fusible resistor that's gone open circuit but without seeing a circuit its impossible to say. If any of the power semiconductors on the heatsinks have failed short circuit then that's a sign that there could well be other damage. Although the parts won't be unique and unobtainable, they are almost certainly not off the shelf common items either.
__________________
-------------------------------------------------------
Installing and using LTspice. From beginner to advanced.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help identifying a component and its value SonyES Digital Source 18 19th June 2013 02:04 PM
I bought bad Mission 753's, T's and x-overs fried, worth fixing? timbert Multi-Way 70 3rd March 2013 02:02 AM
Help Identifying Component CollateralDamage Solid State 8 4th February 2012 10:39 PM
Fixing a Marantz SR8000 (fried input) jettpix Solid State 5 3rd June 2010 06:31 AM
Fried component in Velodyne sub struts Subwoofers 3 24th February 2010 01:39 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:37 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2