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Old 31st January 2011, 09:16 PM   #2551
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Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Cambridge, UK
Default Changes to PS1 .. My Summary

Hi,
I was asked recently to summarize the changes that I have made to my Sony PS1. It seemed to me that this might be of use to others, so here it is. Before I get blasted... please remember it is my personal summary adn it might not agree with yours.


I list the mods that I made and then indicate the benefits

1) Circuit changes according to dogbreath .. removal of caps and insertion of filter. This is a significant improvement to the sound. However, you don’t actually need the filter at the output if the next piece of equipment has its own filter to remove DC. So, in my souped up model there is no filter.

2) I have included a very high quality preamplifier in the output of the PS1. Basically this lets me bring the level up to that needed by the next piece of equipment. However, in the interest of purity, I now have two sets of outputs on the PS1… one direct to the DAC and with no filter, and the other via the built-in pre-amp that I built.

3) I added a 12-second delay on connecting outputs… this is purely to stop the horrible Sony music at start up and stops the sniggering when trying to demonstrate the equipment! Purely a simple cosmetic change.

4) Embedding a remote control receiver.. a convenience of course and no other effects.

5) Embedding a blue led near the laser unit. Apparently this can improve tracking.. so far I have never had tracking problems so I have no idea if this works. However, some people like to see leds in strange place and this keeps them happy.

6) Power supply held externally. This has advantages in longevity .. the unit stays very cool. However, if you follow the actual dogbreath recommendation, some of the regulation takes place inside the PS1 and causes more heat. To remedy this, I mounted a small 12V fan, driven from about 5V… this is near silent and helps with the ventilation. The external power supply is a conventional, heavily filtered and regulated design, with large heatsinks (based on the power supply cabinet of a PC). I am also told that the external power supply helps the audio aspects of the PS1. If so, I do not recognise them.. unless the benefit of longevity is meant.

7) I have embedded a 12V supply (regulated) to drive an external colour screen, so that the track number and so on can be seen. This has yet to be integrated but the supply works fine.

8) I embedded the PS1 inside a substantial steel chassis. This isolates it from shock and provides a good container for all of the circuitry mentioned above. It also looks lot more serious than the grey plastic that Sony chose.

9) I use a transparent cover for the player. This helps in identifying when a cd has settled for playing. Contrary to expectations it had no effect on the laser mistracking.

10) I use a good set of “hard-to-track” cds as tests for setting up the voltages on the laser. It is important to use an isolated screwdriver for this work as the voltages are quite small. This is essential for proper performance.

I have found no variation that is noticeable between players, assuming that the laser has been properly set up. The performance is very solid and the biggest benefit I notice is the breadth of the sound stage and the detail. The bass is not over done, the clarity is amazing and nothing about the system shouts “Hi Fi” at you. I guess this is an extreme example of Sony investing money where it counts, in good design, rather than in pointless 10mm thick front panels and other such nonsense.

If anyone has further suggestions I should be pleased to hear about them
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Old 11th February 2011, 01:48 PM   #2552
raver is offline raver  Italy
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Hi to all,
I have a dumb question for you experts.
I have bought an old 1002 and I also have a mint 7502. I know that the 7502 is not good as CDPlayer, so I was wondering if it was possible to "transplant" all the internal stuff of the 1002 into the 7502 case. As the 7502 has been barely used a few times, I suppose that its laser is in better condition than the one on the 1002. Do this idea make any sense?
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Old 11th February 2011, 03:49 PM   #2553
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Location: Cambridge, UK
Default Transplant

Hi,

I really would not do this. A new laser for a PS1 costs around £5. Try installing that and setting it up properly before jumping to the other chassis. Sell the 7502 to pay for the new laser :-)
I hope this helps

George
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Old 11th February 2011, 03:57 PM   #2554
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Location: Cambridge, UK
Default Power Supply Design / Build

The following is an extract from an answer I sent to a fellow DIYer about the power supply that I built. I am inserting it here on the basis that it might be of interest to others.

I used a power supply box from a PC because it comes complete with power socket, fuse and so on. I did NOT use the internal supply at all.
Because there is little difference between power supply topologies, I used two Velleman regulated supplies as a starting point and
then modified them to follow the dogbreath design. This gave
me a simple start. I bolted a large heatsink to one side of the power
supply box... and believe me, it is needed. The only complication was
that I wanted the on/off on the PS1 to turn on / off everything. So, the
mains power goes into the PS1 and is used internally to drive my auxiliary
circuits, but it also passes out to the external power supply which then
returns the regulated voltages. Turning off the PS1 now turns off
everything from one place. I am using Neutrik power connectors for all of
the power supply work. In fact I am so cheesed off with over priced,
under-engineered, gold-plated connectors in general that I am now using
Neutrik connectors for high and low power connectors where ever possible.
They are excellent quality and very well made.... make sure you use their
professional range. They are sturdy because they are built to stand a
professional daily use. Their internal connections are robust and easy to
make. Highly recommended.
As to the giant caps... I can only quote Nelson pass on this .... DIYers
love to over engineer their power supplies! Why? I suspect because it is
easy and safe to do, requires little calculation to support the
over-engineering and looks impressive. What we are driving is a minuscule
CD player. It makes little demands on supplies. In switching between
various levels of power supply I have not heard significant differences,
except to say that the regulated supplies at dogbreath level are
sufficient and certainly better then the original Sony...especially from
the point of view of overheating the laser deck. I bet you the owners of
those over-capacitated power supplies also drive Harleys :-)

The last bit was a joke to my friend so please don't get excited... all you Harley riders
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Old 11th February 2011, 08:02 PM   #2555
raver is offline raver  Italy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgebrooke View Post
Hi,

I really would not do this. A new laser for a PS1 costs around £5. Try installing that and setting it up properly before jumping to the other chassis. Sell the 7502 to pay for the new laser :-)
I hope this helps

George
Thanks George,
in the old 1002 would you replace the laser anyway or only if it has reading problems?
Which model of laser do you advise to look for (AEM, BAM...)?
Where do you buy them at £5?
Thanks
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Old 11th February 2011, 09:19 PM   #2556
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Location: Cambridge, UK
Hi,
well I have found that mostly setting the voltages will cure all the tracking problems that I have encountered so far. However, starting with a new laser can remove some variables when you are having problems. The voltages given in the dogbreath article are not appropriate fro new lasers.... you need to experiment. You should not find yourself going out of the values he specified by more than + /- 50% or so.
The laser types refer to the laser and the plastic plate... not all types fit all Sonys. Check your current type and order that.
The lasers can be obtained from KSM-440AEM Laser Lens for Sony Playstation PS1 [KSM-440AEM] - US$8.96 : ShenZhen Aido Tech ... and this is mazing value for money. The only issues I ever found with new lasers were a slight binding with the cut out in the PS1 deck and some stability loss. the later was easily fixed with a small amount of Blue Tack on the rear leg. The cutout problem was resolved by transplanting the plastic top from the previous laser onto the new one.
It takes about 20 minutes to open the PS1, connect up the new laser, test and reassemble.
Good luck with the project
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Old 12th February 2011, 06:20 PM   #2557
raver is offline raver  Italy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgebrooke View Post
Hi,
well I have found that mostly setting the voltages will cure all the tracking problems that I have encountered so far. However, starting with a new laser can remove some variables when you are having problems. The voltages given in the dogbreath article are not appropriate fro new lasers.... you need to experiment. You should not find yourself going out of the values he specified by more than + /- 50% or so.
The laser types refer to the laser and the plastic plate... not all types fit all Sonys. Check your current type and order that.
The lasers can be obtained from KSM-440AEM Laser Lens for Sony Playstation PS1 [KSM-440AEM] - US$8.96 : ShenZhen Aido Tech ... and this is mazing value for money. The only issues I ever found with new lasers were a slight binding with the cut out in the PS1 deck and some stability loss. the later was easily fixed with a small amount of Blue Tack on the rear leg. The cutout problem was resolved by transplanting the plastic top from the previous laser onto the new one.
It takes about 20 minutes to open the PS1, connect up the new laser, test and reassemble.
Good luck with the project
Well George,
today I opened my 1002 and checked the laser model, it's a KSM-440ACM. I will order one just to have a spare one in case mine should go bad.
I checked also the voltages and they were:
bias 1.87V
gain 1.87V
laser 11.4mV
some CDR that was playing fine with the newer 7502 weren't playing with this 1002. So I tried to increase the laser voltage. At around 20-24 it played well also these CDRs. To test it further, I took two more CDRs at least 10 years old and of very unknown brand (low quality). One was played fine and the other generated only some jerking noises. But this bad CDR was played not much better even by my LG CDRom player in my PC so I suppose it's really a bad disc.
If I lower the voltage to around 17, also the first of the two bad disks was played with some jerks, while it was ok at around 20-22mV.
So now it's working good with these settings:
bias 1.71V
gain 1.84V
laser 21.4mV
Is the laser voltage too high or it can be left at this level without problems?
thanks
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Old 12th February 2011, 08:19 PM   #2558
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Location: Cambridge, UK
Default Laser voltage

Hi,

I have never needed a voltage that high on the laser ... as far as I can remember (I am on holiday right now in south of France and I do not have my notes with me). Personally if it is necessary to be that high just for a very odd ball cd I probably would decide that the cd was not with the risk. You could try cleaning it and making a fresh copy.
Symptoms of wrong laser voltage include failure to settle the cd, as well as spinning at very high speed continuously, without settling. Assuming that it does settle then mistracking is the next symptom.
Just a point, when you adjust the voltages make sure that the screwdriver is insulated. The voltages that you read will be wrong if some of the current leaks away though you.
Given the price of a new laser I would not worry too much though, the high setting probably reflects the age of the laser itself. I wonder what a new laser for a so-called "high-end" cd player would cost you?
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Old 12th February 2011, 09:10 PM   #2559
raver is offline raver  Italy
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Join Date: Jan 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgebrooke View Post
Hi,

I have never needed a voltage that high on the laser ... as far as I can remember (I am on holiday right now in south of France and I do not have my notes with me). Personally if it is necessary to be that high just for a very odd ball cd I probably would decide that the cd was not with the risk. You could try cleaning it and making a fresh copy.
Symptoms of wrong laser voltage include failure to settle the cd, as well as spinning at very high speed continuously, without settling. Assuming that it does settle then mistracking is the next symptom.
Just a point, when you adjust the voltages make sure that the screwdriver is insulated. The voltages that you read will be wrong if some of the current leaks away though you.
Given the price of a new laser I would not worry too much though, the high setting probably reflects the age of the laser itself. I wonder what a new laser for a so-called "high-end" cd player would cost you?
Maybe you are right and high voltage is because the unit is old. I will put it a bit lower, I think that about 16-17mV should read most of my CDR and it will stay in the +/- 50% from dogbreath as you advised. Anyway, I definitely want to buy a new laser, as prics are so low, but I checked your site (and others tghat sell laser replacements for PSX) but nobody has the 440ACM version that is in my 1002.
P.S. Have a nice vacation, and enjoy some of the great french food and wine to my health . I was in Paris last december and had a great time notwithstanding the snow.
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Old 13th February 2011, 12:48 AM   #2560
same64 is offline same64  Australia
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Default hi

guys.Just find pick up laser from PSONE white small console.
replace it ,just need to be cut bit of plastic to fit properly.
You will never have skiping cd.
There are some post about it..
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