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Old 6th January 2009, 08:24 PM   #2191
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That's funny about bad service from Rich parts. I ordered 2 replacement lasers on separate occasions and they arrived very fast, factory-sealed with no problem. Lucky, I guess but they seem very professional to me.
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Old 6th January 2009, 08:24 PM   #2192
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double post, sorry. Don't know what happened.
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Old 6th January 2009, 08:24 PM   #2193
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I wanted to add that I bought a 4th PS1. This one is in mint condition. Like brand new. Worked perfectly from the first disc. But I find I still have to stand it on it's left side for non-skipping for an entire disc. I just can't beat this problem, somehow.
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Old 6th January 2009, 08:51 PM   #2194
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Rich, when you have a chance, it would be helpful to have the values and maybe the part numbers along with which specific parts you replaced. The photo is kind of dark and I can't read all the values off the sides of the caps, especially where they're printed on the back side (funny thingie here).

Sounds like a worthwhile effort, and a lot less trouble than building a new power supply from scratch.

--Buckapound
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Old 6th January 2009, 11:23 PM   #2195
rhing is offline rhing  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by Buckapound
Rich, when you have a chance, it would be helpful to have the values and maybe the part numbers along with which specific parts you replaced. The photo is kind of dark and I can't read all the values off the sides of the caps, especially where they're printed on the back side (funny thingie here).

Sounds like a worthwhile effort, and a lot less trouble than building a new power supply from scratch.

--Buckapound
I've included BOMs from Mouser (Nichicon caps) and Digi-Key (Panasonic caps) depending on preference. I went with Mouser, because I wanted to try the Wima MKP10 caps on the AC input, but I am sure that the Epcos MKP caps are fine. Certainly, the Panasonic FC and FM caps would be good in this power supply. I still haven't installed the IXYS HEXFREDs, but that will be soon.


Mouser, SR670

Quantity Reference Part Supplier Supplier Part No.
4 D101, D102, D103, D104 IXYS DIODE FRED 600V 30A TO-247AD Mouser 747-DSEP30-06A
1 C101 Wima MKP10 Polypropylene Film Capacitors 400V .1uF 5% Mouser 505-M10.1/400/5
1 C104 Nichicon CS Low Impedance Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - 105 Degree 220uF 200V 18X25 20% Mouser 647-UCS2D221MHD
1 C111 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 47uF 50V 20% Mouser 647-UKT1H470MED
1 C201 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 1000uF 25V 20% Mouser 647-UKT1E102MPD
1 C202 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 1000uF 16V 20% Mouser 647-UKT1C102MPD
1 C203 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 2200uF 16V 20% Mouser 647-UKT1C222MHD
1 C204 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 1000uF 6.3V 20% Mouser 647-UKT0J102MPD
1 IEC receptacle Furutech FI-10 (G) IEC Receptacle Sonic Craft Furutech FI-10 (G)
1 Chassis wire Furutech FP-314Ag Wire Sonic Craft Furutech FP-314Ag


Digi-Key, SR670

Quantity Reference Part Supplier Supplier Part No.
4 D101, D102, D103, D104 IXYS DIODE FRED 600V 30A TO-247AD Digi-Key DSEP30-06A-ND
1 C101 Epcos CAP .10UF 305VAC EMI SUPPRESSION Digi-Key 495-2319-ND
1 C104 Panasonic CAP 150UF 200V ELECT ED RADIAL Digi-Key P13520-ND
1 C111 Panasonic CAP 47UF 35V ELECT FC RADIAL Digi-Key P11232-ND
1 C201 Panasonic CAP 1200UF 16V ELECT FM RADIAL Digi-Key P12367-ND
1 C202 Panasonic CAP 680UF 16V ELECT FM RADIAL Digi-Key P12378-ND
1 C203 Panasonic CAP 2200UF 10V ELECT FM RADIAL Digi-Key P12357-ND
1 C204 Panasonic CAP 1200UF 10V ELECT FM RADIAL Digi-Key P12355-ND
1 IEC receptacle Furutech FI-10 (G) IEC Receptacle Sonic Craft Furutech FI-10 (G)
1 Chassis wire Furutech FP-314Ag Wire Sonic Craft Furutech FP-314Ag


Mouser, 1-473-380-1x

Quantity Reference Part Supplier Supplier Part No.
4 D101, D102, D103, D104 IXYS DIODE FRED 600V 30A TO-247AD Mouser 747-DSEP30-06A
1 C001 Wima MKP10 Polypropylene Film Capacitors 400V .1uF 5% Mouser 505-M10.1/400/5
1 C003 Nichicon CS Low Impedance Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - 105 Degree 220uF 200V 18X25 20% Mouser 647-UCS2D221MHD
1 C102 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 1000uF 25V 20% Mouser 647-UKT1E102MPD
1 C103 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 1000uF 25V 20% Mouser 647-UKT1E102MPD
1 C104 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 330uF 25V 20% Mouser 647-UKT1E331MPD
1 C105 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 1000uF 25V 20% Mouser 647-UKT1E102MPD
1 C107 Nichicon KT Audio Electrolytic Capacitors 1uF 50V 20% Mouser 647-UKT1H010MDD
1 IEC receptacle Furutech FI-10 (G) IEC Receptacle Sonic Craft Furutech FI-10 (G)
1 Chassis wire Furutech FP-314Ag Wire Sonic Craft Furutech FP-314Ag


Digi-Key, 1-473-380-1x

Quantity Reference Part Supplier Supplier Part No.
4 D101, D102, D103, D104 IXYS DIODE FRED 600V 30A TO-247AD Digi-Key DSEP30-06A-ND
1 C001 Epcos CAP .10UF 305VAC EMI SUPPRESSION Digi-Key 495-2319-ND
1 C003 Panasonic CAP 150UF 200V ELECT ED RADIAL Digi-Key P13520-ND
1 C102 Panasonic CAP 680UF 25V ELECT FM RADIAL Digi-Key P12390-ND
1 C103 Panasonic CAP 680UF 25V ELECT FM RADIAL Digi-Key P12390-ND
1 C104 Panasonic CAP 330UF 25V ELECT FM RADIAL Digi-Key P12387-ND
1 C105 Panasonic CAP 470UF 25V ELECT FM RADIAL Digi-Key P12388-ND
1 C107 Panasonic CAP 1UF 50V ELECT FC RADIAL Mouser P10312-ND
1 IEC receptacle Furutech FI-10 (G) IEC Receptacle Sonic Craft Furutech FI-10 (G)
1 Chassis wire Furutech FP-314Ag Wire Sonic Craft Furutech FP-314Ag


I also intend to replace the cheap PVC-insulated DC power wires with Teflon-insulated Silver-plated Copper wires. I just found some break-away flat cable connectors that Mick Feuerbacher describes in his Web site.
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Old 7th January 2009, 02:54 PM   #2196
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Wow, thanks for all that.

I'm assuming the SR670 and 1-473-380-1x refer to power supply board models. I've got a different one (SCPH 1000, one w/ opamps on both the RCA and AV outs), 1-413-997-14. It has one fewer and mostly lower value caps. I assume just replace all the electrolytics, right? And I am also assuming that messing with values without knowing what I'm doing is asking for trouble.

BTW, are the diodes discussed somewhere in this forum? What do they replace and how do they improve the performance? Twenty bucks is a lot to spend on a $15 machine.

Cheers,

--Buckapound
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Old 7th January 2009, 05:47 PM   #2197
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SR670 and 1-473-380-1x do refer to power supply board models. It appears that Sony made quite a few different power supply variants, and I've even seen identical power supply board models with different branded caps along with other different components. For instance, a friend's Model No. 1-473-380-13 PSU PCB has all Panasonic FC caps on it, while mine had less expensive Nichicon and United Chemicon caps. Who knows what Sony did with component supplies on the motherboard. I believe that might be part of the reason why some report that they really like their Playstations and others don't. Anyway, for the electrolytics, I arbitrarily picked the next higher capacitance value with the same or higher voltage rating. I also kept in mind the diameter and height (i.e., length) of the caps to insure that they would fit. The same applies to replacing the MKT cap at the AC input. I chose Wima MKP10 caps that had a 10mm or 15mm lead spacing, housing dimensions and the same or higher voltage rating (e.g., 250V) that would fit. The power supply board really doesn't provide much spacing between components to allow for more experimentation. I should also note that you should reference manufacturers' data sheets for component dimensions and not distributors' catalogs or Web pages. I found many errors in Mouser's Web pages, especially with the Nichicon cap dimensions.

I already referenced previous posts regarding the replacement of rectifier diodes. The IXYS HEXFREDs were recommended by Greg Stewart, but he has not actually tried these particular diodes in his Playstation. He used the Stealth soft recovery diodes in the rectifier with film caps. I have not tried the IXYS HEXFREDs since I like the improvements that the caps alone have made, and just want to listen to music for the time being. Perhaps I'll try it some time in the future, but I have a few other projects I need to complete like my PassDIY B1 Buffer and modded Sure Electronics T-amp.

I should mention that modifying the signal output stage per Mick Feuerbacher's Web site yielded the most significant improvements in sound quality, especially after the 4.7uF/50V Black Gate N caps and 22k PRP metal film resistors I used had many, many hours to burn-in. The power supply cap upgrades made slight improvements much like using a better power cord. I am sure there are those on these forums that would debate this, but that's what I hear. I still think the $5 or so investment is worth it. I like classical orchestral music, and the crescendos peak with greater dynamic range (i.e., no compression or disintegration of the soundstage).
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Old 12th January 2009, 12:08 AM   #2198
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Hola amigos!

Check this information about the Mitsumi SR670 Series power supply

http://www.mitsumi.co.jp/Catalog/pdf...1_sr_670_e.pdf

Jose
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Old 12th January 2009, 12:43 AM   #2199
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Hola Jose,

Thanks for the Mitsumi reference. Have you had a chance to upgrade the caps yet? I just upgraded a friend's Playstation 1 (output stage mod and power supply caps). The Black Gate N caps on the output stage will take more time to break in, but it definitely sounds better than a stock unit. In this particular Playstation, the power supply model no. was 1-473-380-13. This had the Panasonic FC caps on the secondary switching stage, and a Panasonic NHG as the bigger smoothing cap on the primary switching stage. My firend asked me to make the changes to the Nichicon KT audi caps and a Nichicon CS for the primary stage smoothing cap. I installed a Wima MKP10 on the AC line filter. If there was more room, an Auricap metallized Propylene cap would have been a good choice for this spot as well.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ps1 mod-29.jpg (49.9 KB, 913 views)
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Old 12th January 2009, 01:07 AM   #2200
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Hi!

Not yet. I'm still waiting for a new PS Audio C-7 cable from Audio Advisor that is in backorder....

Have you read the Stereophile article with measurements? Some of the problems measured were due to the proximity of the lens to the power supply. So it's better to take it the PS out on a nother box even if upgraded.

http://www.stereophile.com/cdplayers...ay/index4.html

Other comments...

The PS1's maximum output level was the same—1.09V RMS at 1kHz—from its RCA jacks and from its multipin A/V output, this more than 5dB lower than the CD standard's 2V.

the RCA jacks inverted signal polarity.

Error correction was superb, the PS1 suffering no glitches in its output until the gaps in the data spiral on the Pierre Verany test CD reached 1.5mm in length.

The PS1's frequency response (fig.1, top pair of traces) revealed excellent channel matching.

However, the ripple in the top three octaves indicates an underspecified digital filter, which will tend to smear time-domain information.

The peaks at 60 and 180Hz are due to magnetically induced hum from the AC transformer and the overall noise floor is up to 15dB higher than that of a good inexpensive CD player,

Peculiarly, the linearity error (fig.3), assessed with a 500Hz tone, suggested even worse low-level performance than that shown in fig.2, while the PS1's reproduction of an undithered tone at exactly –90.31dBFS was obscured by noise

Overall, it looks as if the first-generation PS1 offers around 14-bit resolution.

the PS1 offered moderate rejection of word-clock jitter, at 737 picoseconds peak–peak.

most of the jitter comes from a pair of sidebands at the data-related frequencies of 11.025kHz, ±230Hz, and the AC supply–related frequencies of ±60Hz.

Overall, this is a pretty poor set of measurements.

I wonder, therefore, if the "magic" of the PlayStation 1's sound lies not in its technical excellence but in the fact that it smears over and disguises much of what is wrong with typical CD sound quality, to which it adds a touch of low-level compression from the linearity error.

Certainly, when I recently listened to a PS1 as the source in a system comprising an inexpensive Cayin tube integrated amplifier driving Definitive Technology Mythos ST speakers,.it sounded relaxed and informative in a manner I would not have expected from this measured performance.

Jose
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