LClock XO2 - seems to have one little flaw - diyAudio
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Old 25th March 2002, 06:40 AM   #1
ergo is offline ergo  Estonia
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Default LClock XO2 - seems to have one little flaw

I was experimenting with LClock XO2 yesterday putting it in Marantz CD67. It worked, but as my player is actually faulty at the moment (something with supply instability and clock problems) I was probing around the player a lot. So I noticed that there was an additional nasty noise component noticable on many supply lines and also on ground lines. So I ended up to LClock +12V pin. There was considerable AC component of the same frequency as the clock but with nastier shape, going back into the players supply....

Well, to confirm it I took the LClock out and used a separate benchtop supply to provide 12V. The AC component formed on supply lines was 110mV. The LClock uses LC filter in its supply input, but this seems still not to be enough. The inductor decrased the AC about 10-15mV, but still left a lot.....

Anyway, considering this I would suggest that totally separate supply is a good idea for LClock and even then use a lot of decoupling and keep the wires as short as possible. This high frequency will defenetly fly around : )

If one uses players internal supply, I think some experimenting might be a good idea as to where to connect the LClock grounds to make least harm.

As for the output of LClock, it's of course looks absolutely wonderful on scope, as it should be. I can't comment on sound as the player is still working against me and refuses to get repaired

Ergo
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Old 25th March 2002, 09:57 AM   #2
UrSv is offline UrSv  Sweden
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Sounds funny to me. I would recheck the board for faults and if everything is OK immediately contact LC Audio and check if it normal behaviour so that the clock is actually OK.

/UrSv
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Old 25th March 2002, 03:41 PM   #3
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Default RFI from LCAudio clock

I have one of these installed in a Rotel RCD-971, and so much RF radiates from the feeder voltage supply lines to it that I can get a good signal on my scope by simply placing the probe an inch from these lines! Ditto the line feeding the clock signal down to the pc board. Norman
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Old 25th March 2002, 05:08 PM   #4
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If your scope probe has one of those neat little ground probes that you can attach, try it. Bet things will look much beter.

Jocko
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Old 16th June 2003, 04:51 AM   #5
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Perhaps the LClock PSU would help out in eliminating that noise?

I have installed the LClock XO2 in my Rotel RCD-971 as well and I can hear some humming as well, when I turn the volume up. I'm pretty sure its because of the LClock. I was thinking that maybe I should buy that PSU that comes with the Hyperkit... its only $33 DIYCable.
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Old 16th June 2003, 09:37 PM   #6
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I have installed the LClock XO2 in my Rotel RCD-971 as well and I can hear some humming as well, when I turn the volume up. I'm pretty sure its because of the LClock. I was thinking that maybe I should buy that PSU that comes with the Hyperkit... its only $33 DIYCable. [/B][/QUOTE]
--------------------------------------------------------
Designers seem happy for people to stick large clock circuit boards in the worst part of players for noise (near digital processors).

Where you take the dc from matters and may be you need to measure noise voltages throughout the system.

I has a BIG problem with a Sony SACD player which completely disappeared when I removed the ac ground by chance. Many units have multiple grounds including the very expensive Marantz CD12 system with really polluted analogue supplies! It just makes you wonder.
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Old 16th June 2003, 10:14 PM   #7
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Default I used to wonder.......

Then I realised that they were designed solely with an autorouter.

Ground is ground, and digital is perfect forever.

Jocko
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Old 17th June 2003, 08:51 AM   #8
Zombie is offline Zombie  Sweden
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Ergo: I have an LClock XO2 in my CD63KIS. If you want you can measure it.
Send me a private mail...
Tervitused,
Thomas
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