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Old 12th September 2013, 06:04 AM   #1
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Default Are Esstech components ROHS compliant?

Hi all,

Might one of you know if Esstech's A/D & D/A converters (http://esstech.com/) are ROHS compliant - or have some other environmental certification?

Greetings,

Jesper
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Last edited by gentlevoice; 12th September 2013 at 06:06 AM.
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Old 12th September 2013, 10:53 AM   #2
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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As they are used in commercial products that are RoHS compliant I would say yes, though without access to a data sheet I could not confirm 100%. But nearly ALL components these days are RoHS compliant, I occasionally have to try and get non RoHS components (ie tin/lead finish on the leads to avoid re plating or process problems) and it is almost impossible to find them these days.
An interesting affect of RoHS components and solder is the increased use of energy to achieve the correct soldering temperature has increased the carbon footprint to build an assembly
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Old 12th September 2013, 01:14 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marce View Post
As they are used in commercial products that are RoHS compliant I would say yes, though without access to a data sheet I could not confirm 100%. But nearly ALL components these days are RoHS compliant, I occasionally have to try and get non RoHS components (ie tin/lead finish on the leads to avoid re plating or process problems) and it is almost impossible to find them these days.
An interesting affect of RoHS components and solder is the increased use of energy to achieve the correct soldering temperature has increased the carbon footprint to build an assembly
Have you noticed BGA chips fail quickly if lead free solder is used and tin used in micro electronics grows little whiskers and short circuits the legs of some 200pin or more chips!
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Old 12th September 2013, 04:12 PM   #4
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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Spent 3 years doing research into component finishes, lead free soldering and reliability for a project I worked on, we stuck with tin/lead solder and had ALL our component re-tinned or in the case of BGA's re-balled at 2.3p per ball.
Tin whiskers is why you will only get a 10 year life expectancy from todays electronics.
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Old 13th September 2013, 06:13 AM   #5
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Hi both,

& thanks for replying. Hmm .... I've heard about this lead "challenge" before - actually from one of the people putting the cradle-to-cradle philosophy in words (Michael Braungart). So would like to thread carefully here ...

@marce: I have some of the Esstech datasheets, however, as far as I can see there's no mentioning of ROHS or environmental topics in them whatsoever. Neither on their website. So ... But I reckon you have a point in saying that they should be ROHS compliant - otherwise - to my knowledge it wouldn't be possible to get a CE mark in Europe, right?

BTW: One of you know of a relatively low diameter solder that doesn't cause/"help" my solder iron tips scale/oxidize? With the current solder I use ("no clean" Sn, Ag, Cu) the tips only last a few days (assuming this is the culprit)

Cheers,

Jesper
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Last edited by gentlevoice; 13th September 2013 at 06:19 AM.
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Old 13th September 2013, 08:42 AM   #6
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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What is the tip made from?
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Old 13th September 2013, 08:58 AM   #7
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Hi marce,

It's this one I use (Weller WSP 80 & WSD 80):

Catalog No. LT1L Product Detail

BTW I've just finished one of the projects you've helped with suggestions for (the HF add-on amplifier) And it looks as if the amplifier's intrinsic noise is less than the oscilloscope's at 2mV vertical resolution (input grounded) meaning that I should be able to measure down to ~6 uV noise levels up to about 150 MHz. I'm sort of in awe - a bit unreal & yet ...

Thanks a lot for your suggestions on the ground plane, marce

Cheers,

Jesper
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Old 13th September 2013, 10:34 AM   #8
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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One of the problems with lead free solder is the leaching of iron (I have seen solder pots with holes in them), and I suspect this may be your problem! How to solve it, I don't know of the top of my head, maybe the Weller site will have some info.
Glad I could help with the layout, buzzing at the moment as I went down to London to change some PCB designs were they were failing EMC tests, just got the results back and my redesign passes up to 18GHz susceptibility. it will be interesting trying to pass on the design techniques to some as it used ferrite beads, and some audiophiles think these destroy the sound, yet also moan about RF spoiling the sound!
If anything comes to mind on soldering iron tips I will let you know, I have a large (but unsorted) library of all things related to PCB design and assembly so I will have a look through that.
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Old 16th September 2013, 04:03 PM   #9
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Hi marce,

Quote:
How to solve it, I don't know of the top of my head, maybe the Weller site will have some info.
I have searched on the Weller site and they do have some information, however, it's mainly aimed at solder containing lead and I'd rather not use this as I don't have an efficient exhaust system. So now I have written to them to hear if they can recommend a non-lead solder - that still works.

Quote:
just got the results back and my redesign passes up to 18GHz susceptibility. it will be interesting trying to pass on the design techniques to some as it used ferrite beads, and some audiophiles think these destroy the sound, yet also moan about RF spoiling the sound!
... Probably at a completely different level I've used ferrite beads on the transistors for years. Discovered some years back that the sound with the beads on some of the transistor legs was more relaxed and coherent - my assumption was that it cured ever so slight tendencies towards oscillations ...

18 GHz! ta-da ... would make for ~DSD524288 ;-)

Greetings,

Jesper
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Old 16th September 2013, 07:11 PM   #10
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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The flux fumes are more of a problem than the lead, Rosin based ones being of particular concern, but none are good for you'
Marc
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