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Old 21st January 2013, 05:22 PM   #31
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Thanks 'Mooly' - I have taken the effort in taking some clear close-up pictures of me going as far as I dare with cleaning the lens - is there anything you can point out in any of those pictures which might be relevant to me Camera+ photo ? Sorry, this will literally be my first time with a soldering iron! If you search for Arcam CD73 laser on eBay you will see the part that I have purchased. I guess I don't want to have to remove my existing laser when there maybe nothing wrong with it after doing some voltage tests.
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Old 21st January 2013, 06:50 PM   #32
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Voltage tests aren't conclusive proof (as you can see reading this thread) but they can useful if they do show a problem. If they don't then the pickup is still a suspect.

I always remove the drawer for access on players like these. Shpuld be fairly obvious when you look at it as to how it comes out. Open it first under power as far as it goes and then disconnect the mains. Often just a bendy plastic tab somewhere is a stop either on the drawer or the frame.

In the last few pics you can see the white plastic housings at each end of the rail. The rear one has a bendy plastic tab that "holds" the rail in place horizontally. Push the rail hard into the tab and then bend the tab out of the way. The rail slides out completely allowing the pickup to be removed. Refit is just the reverse. Theres no timing of gears to worry about and the pickup will automatically go to the correct position at power up.

The ribbon cable is just a push fit (I can't see any locking tabs on the socket on the pickup). Hold it by the blue part which is far stronger when pushing it back.

The shorting link if it has one is just a solder blob across two of the lines of print on the pickup. This is a different pickup but you get the idea. Just quickly touch a clean iron tip on the solder and it will come off.
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Old 22nd January 2013, 07:54 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooly View Post
Voltage tests aren't conclusive proof (as you can see reading this thread) but they can useful if they do show a problem. If they don't then the pickup is still a suspect.

I always remove the drawer for access on players like these. Shpuld be fairly obvious when you look at it as to how it comes out. Open it first under power as far as it goes and then disconnect the mains. Often just a bendy plastic tab somewhere is a stop either on the drawer or the frame.

In the last few pics you can see the white plastic housings at each end of the rail. The rear one has a bendy plastic tab that "holds" the rail in place horizontally. Push the rail hard into the tab and then bend the tab out of the way. The rail slides out completely allowing the pickup to be removed. Refit is just the reverse. Theres no timing of gears to worry about and the pickup will automatically go to the correct position at power up.

The ribbon cable is just a push fit (I can't see any locking tabs on the socket on the pickup). Hold it by the blue part which is far stronger when pushing it back.

The shorting link if it has one is just a solder blob across two of the lines of print on the pickup. This is a different pickup but you get the idea. Just quickly touch a clean iron tip on the solder and it will come off.
Thanks - I'll give that a go - no point in paying Arcam 160 because I may as well just put that towards a new player (however I do like the sound of this particular Arcam).

Someone at work gave me a tip - they said check to see if there is a laser coming from the lens by holding a digital camera over the top and looking in the preview screen of the camera because many digital cameras can 'see' infra-red (obviously check to see if your camera can first by testing on a household remote control).

Also, turn the wick up on the lens a very small amount clockwise using the turn screw as seen on the very bottom photo to see if this supplies more power to the laser from which it may start to engage with the CD.

Are the above useful tips for diagnosing laser problems do you think?

Also - if I need to de-solder the shorting link - does that mean I need to solder it back on again with the new lens?
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Old 22nd January 2013, 11:08 AM   #34
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The shorting link is just to protect the laser diode from static during handling. Officially it is removed after connecting the ribbon. The only time the link is in place is when handling and storing the pickup.

That "turn screw" is a preset resistor. General advice is don't touch unless you know what you are doing and can see and measure the effect. The serial number on your laser ends in 411. That means the current should be 41.1 milliamps. That current determines the optical power output of the laser diode. By all means check it by deducing the current from the volt drop across the low value resistor that will be present in the APC (automatic power control circuit) part of the circuitry as detailed earlier in the thread.

A digital camera may well show the laser light in the same way that it shows an ordinary IR remote control is transmitting but it will say nothing of the output power.

Fit the new pickup... and if it doesn't work then think about diving in deeper
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Old 22nd January 2013, 11:59 AM   #35
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perhaps another silly question - if I fit the new laser will I need specialist tools to realign the laser?
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Old 22nd January 2013, 12:04 PM   #36
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It should work straight off, that said a scope is essential really for any CD player adjustment.

You might find this interesting where the effect of various adjustments are detailed. Not all players have all these and some may not have any. This particular pickup has two extra presets that are normally on the main PCB but the procedures are identical,

Sony CDP790 and KSS240 Restoration Project
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