Please help fixing Pioneer PDR-555RW - Page 5 - diyAudio
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Old 15th September 2010, 11:54 PM   #41
cheryl is offline cheryl  United States
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Stephen, if it starts acting up again I will do the cleanup/re-solder when my new solder tip arrives. I'll let you know if it goes TU again.

Any recommendations on the type of grease to use on the rails? I did a fairly good job of cleaning the assembly and managed to not break anything -- but I had to wear 2 pairs of eyeglasses to see the tiny parts/screws. Yeah, I'm old and blind.
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Old 16th September 2010, 03:48 AM   #42
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A very light coating of a fairly thin silicone or other grease is all that is needed. An easy source is an automotive part store, wear they sell the right sort of stuff as a bettery terminal coating/protectant.
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Old 16th September 2010, 04:46 AM   #43
cheryl is offline cheryl  United States
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Cool...I may even have some of that in the garage. Thanks!!
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Old 16th September 2010, 03:33 PM   #44
afecu is offline afecu  United States
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Cheryl, that's quite odd!

I wonder what happens if you unplug the cable to the volume control assembly. That connects to the audio board, not the main digital control board, so I wonder if anything got corroded there? Or something with the power supply?? ??
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Old 16th September 2010, 05:07 PM   #45
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I am fairly sure that the laser pickup casting is 'zinc potmetal', especially given the nature of the corrosion. I do not think anything else in the player is made of zinc, so I really doubt there will be any more such damage anywhere else in the player.
RCA made all of the cast parts for their ribbon microphone housings out of zinc potmetal, so I know zinc oxide deposits when I see them.
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Old 16th September 2010, 05:43 PM   #46
cheryl is offline cheryl  United States
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I disconnected all the ribbon cables and checked the undersides of all the boards and nothing else was corroded -- it was all clean as a whistle.

I cleaned the pickup assembly over a little box and had a nice little pile of crystals when I was done. It did seem to permanently discolor the potmetal and left tiny pits in the surface but the little circuit boards are now free of crystals.

Pots and switches seem to build up a lot of oxide in this climate from both the humidity and volcano. Even household wiring, like light switches, build up corrosion and then fail due to the heat caused by the resistance. Certain plastics build up a really weird type of powdery corrosion -- especially the clear plastic screwdriver handles. It's the weirdest damn thing I've ever seen.

The other day I pulled an old handheld cassette player out of a storage box. It was a water-resistant model that used about 3 different types of plastic and some rubberized parts as seals. The main body, a hard black plastic, was covered with the weird corrosion -- it almost looks like thick white, powdery mold but it isn't mold. The yellow plastic was in perfect condition and so were the rubberized parts. It is next to impossible to remove and leaves a damaged surface to the plastic. I've never seen anything like this in my life and I've been around a while... I've taken to sealing unused items in Daisy Seal-a-Meal bags to protect them.
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Old 17th September 2010, 02:35 AM   #47
cheryl is offline cheryl  United States
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Okay, I got too excited. It won't record. Before I took it apart this last time, the only thing it would do was recognize CD-R's and record them. Any other disks resulted in check disc.

Today I tried to record. It recognizes all 3 types of discs just fine. It even goes through the motions of recording a CD-R, but when I try to finalize I get "Repair". The manual says that means I unplugged the unit during recording blah, blah, blah and that it needs to fix the tracking. It seems to go through the repair process and one time it even wrote the TOC when I finalized (another time it failed to write it), but the disc is not playable on anything. It does look like it was written to.

This "Repair" sounds so related to the memory cap. Stephen, are these the types of symptoms you see from PCB damage related to the nasty cap?

On the plus side, it is playing pre-recorded discs just fine and all of the functions seem to work. But now I have a player and not a recorder and previously I had a recorder and not a player... The irony...

My new soldering iron and tiny tips arrived -- still waiting on the heat sinks.
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Old 17th September 2010, 02:51 AM   #48
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Yes, you are experience what to me are classic signs of "didn't fix all the through-holes that needed fixing". Just do all the thru-holes that look remotely suspect. Look at them under good magnification, from top side & bottom side. Also do any that are very close to blackened areas of traces.
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Old 17th September 2010, 06:19 PM   #49
cheryl is offline cheryl  United States
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I've soldered before but never on a circuit board.

Do you recommend a particular type of solder to use? Any special precautions other than avoiding excess heat?

Since there was no visible corrosion, I think I'll start in a small circle around the cap area and then test the unit before proceeding further.

Thanks,
Cheryl
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Old 17th September 2010, 07:44 PM   #50
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I always use Kester SN63, 63/37 tin/lead alloy, 0.02-0.031" gauge being easiest to work with.
The corrosion can be very sneaky from that damned Elna cap. I've seen tiny black spots on traces from it as far as 2 inches from the cap. You really need to examine with a good magnifying glass and good light.
I imagine the plastic corrosion you see in your area is due to the sulfur dioxide in the air from the volcano. Also no doubt responsible for the zinc casting corrosion. Not a contaminant that many of us are used to dealing with. I don't know if it has any reactivity with copper, but it might be a good idea in your case to re-coat any blackened traces you have to scrape clean with a brush-on lacquer of some sort to prevent copper sulfate formation.
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