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Best resistors For I/V Conversion?
Best resistors For I/V Conversion?
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Old 18th March 2016, 12:52 AM   #21
Bidule is offline Bidule  France
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What would be the best for TDA1543 ?

What do you think, in this case (TDA1543), of susumu smd resistors (RG2012P-102-B) 1K/0,1%, SMD0805 ?
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Old 18th March 2016, 02:31 PM   #22
savinalexandru is offline savinalexandru  Romania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by savinalexandru View Post
Hi,
The bulk foil Vishay resistors for I/V stage that some of you are using are the same with ''Z201 Series''?
Have anyone of you noticed sound difference, lets say, between 0.05% and 0.1%?

Kind rgs,
Alex.
So digging deeper, seems that are two series:
VAR series, that is naked Z-Foil, audio grade
Z201 series, that is plastic cased

Same question remain, have you used VAR series or Z201 for your I/V resistors?

Have a great weekend!
Alex.
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Old 19th March 2016, 01:40 AM   #23
georgehifi is offline georgehifi  Australia
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NSL32SR2S???
You could try one of these to see what it sounds like in this very low power position.

You could use NSL32SRS that I use in the "Lightspeed Attenuator" and fix the led brightness to it to give the R value you want. Many including myself believe they sound better than any type of resistor, being made from CdS (Cadmium Sulphide).
And you could vary the R on the fly by changing the led brightness to find your optimal listening preference.

Cheers George
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Last edited by georgehifi; 19th March 2016 at 01:51 AM.
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Old 19th March 2016, 02:47 AM   #24
jcx is offline jcx  United States
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Bruce Hofer of Audio Precision, in his Analog Master Class seminars, mentions that the best 5ppm thin film R are the real deal for measured low distortion at audio frequencies

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcx View Post
it appears that Hofer is saying that some bulk metal foil don't perform proportionately as much better than some thin film just considering TCR

a guess would be that the extreme low TCR are obtained in part by balancing mechanical strain and TC of substrate and foil - so there is a more complicated thermo-mechanical effect that doesn't work to full benefit above fractional Hz and below kHz

but the foil still has as low TCR as any thin film as far as I know – so it shouldn't actually be worse than thin film – just not as much better as might be expected by the DC TCR ratios

it would be useful to know which “some bulk metal foil” are that show this – Z foil? - differ between chips, leaded, “naked”, fully encapsulated? as well as the numbers, plots

Last edited by jcx; 19th March 2016 at 02:49 AM.
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Old 19th March 2016, 07:52 PM   #25
Eldam is offline Eldam  France
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgehifi View Post
NSL32SR2S???
You could try one of these to see what it sounds like in this very low power position.

You could use NSL32SRS that I use in the "Lightspeed Attenuator" and fix the led brightness to it to give the R value you want. Many including myself believe they sound better than any type of resistor, being made from CdS (Cadmium Sulphide).
And you could vary the R on the fly by changing the led brightness to find your optimal listening preference.

Cheers George
Hey, : It could work with such as low current ?
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Old 19th March 2016, 08:35 PM   #26
georgehifi is offline georgehifi  Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eldam View Post
Hey, : It could work with such as low current ?
Yes and the led works on 5vdc in the Lightspeed , which you have inside most dacs, so no power supply need to be built.

Someone should give this a go, it very strange I didn't think to try it, before doing the AD844 http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/digit...ad844-i-v.html for I/V stage.

Cheers George
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Old 20th March 2016, 12:34 AM   #27
Chris Daly is offline Chris Daly  Australia
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Originally Posted by georgehifi View Post
Yes and the led works on 5vdc in the Lightspeed , which you have inside most dacs, so no power supply need to be built.
Cheers George
If you want it to sound miserable, the problem being an awful presumption that digital 5v+ power lines
are suitable for LDR's - go ahead

Last edited by Chris Daly; 20th March 2016 at 12:40 AM.
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Old 20th March 2016, 01:13 AM   #28
georgehifi is offline georgehifi  Australia
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That's a bit rich coming from the one who tried pushing this "miserable" opamp pass transistor idea onto the unsuspecting.

Op amps and Pass Transistors

Cheers George
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Old 20th March 2016, 02:13 AM   #29
Damon Hill is offline Damon Hill  United States
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Vishay's bulk metal foil material comes in several grades, the Z1 foil is their current most stable material, the rest is mostly in packaging to absolutely minimize temperature coefficient. Bulk foil, thin film and wirewound resistors are all typically made of nickel-chrome alloys (with 'secret' ingredients); the foil is much thicker than metal films and has a much better voltage coefficient. This is an advantage shared with wirewounds over thin film, especially very high resistance films. High stability wirewounds may rival bulk foil resistors in sound quality, and I tend to think of bulk foil resistors as miniaturized wirewounds.

There are some very stable metal film resistors, such as Vishay/Dale PTF series, that approach foil resistors in temperature stability. These may sound better than run-of-the-mill 100 ppm TC metal film resistors.

Vishay offers enhanced stability grade Z-foil resistors that are 'pre-aged' to remove the last traces of drift (generally below .005%), and hermetically sealed in oil to further enhance stability by eliminating moisture and oxygen from affecting the foil and to heat sink the resistive element. They'll be priced accordingly and I wouldn't bother with them, just that those resistors are probably the 'ultimate' in stability over time and environment, where absolute value is important, as in metrology applications.

I don't think there are any great differences between metal foil resistors that are rated by tolerance, such as 1%, .1% or even .001%; just that they are stable enough to hold that tolerance over time. That's slightly more desirable.

I've found RNR series metal film resistors that are hermetically sealed in glass with argon (or helium?) and gold leads, but these are just metal film resistors with a military/ aerospace grade reliability and environmental protection. The resistor element and end caps are clearly visible through the glass package (no paint) . I doubt they are 'special' in any audible sense, but I don't think audiophiles have yet 'discovered' these parts and have tried listening to samples.

There are some other materials used as resistive elements, such as tantalum nitride that may be of similar quality to nickel-chrome alloys, but they are uncommon and I've never used those types.
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Old 21st March 2016, 12:41 AM   #30
quantran is offline quantran  Viet Nam
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Takman Rey is very good. Transparent, neutral and non-fatigue sound.
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