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Old 18th October 2006, 04:54 PM   #11
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Default Re: EMU 1212m

Quote:
Originally posted by rossco_50


Kevinkr has moved to the j river media player for his htpc project, but this seemed to be more for its format support. although listening tests have also obviously been positive for him.

Another one. Good to see.
I talked to at least two guys telling me that JRMC over Ramdisc plays better than Wavelab.


Quote:
Originally posted by rossco_50


I recently read on hydorgen audio that ubuntu now comes with the alsa drivers preconfigured to resample everything to 48khz. This can be turned off with varying degrees of difficulty, but might be worth checking when setting up your newly installed linux os.

Isn't there a new ubunto audio distribution coming out soon.

As far as i know peufeu mentioned amarok as linux player.

I think its based on XINE. That would be also an interesting try.

Are there drivers for pure USB-AUDIO at Linux. Just to support
e.g. my PCM2707?


Quote:
Originally posted by rossco_50


I was interested to try xmcd as it seems to be a cd player with real time multiple read and a jitter correction algorithm. Workload prevents at the moment, but might be interesting for others. lamip is a foobar clone for linux, but seemingly only in terms of interface.


xmcd doesn't support ASIO yet. Otherwise it looks promising.

Player without ASIO or complete rewritten USB drivers are not acceptable to me for my setup. I know what usb-audio.sys is doing to the stream.
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Old 18th October 2006, 04:57 PM   #12
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I like the squeezebox, the DACs are now comparable with many high performance players and soundcards, and is affordable in the scheme of things. great solution.

I think that the pc can be quietened and not only allows storage and playback of audio, but can be used for all sorts of diy - measurement, crossovers, drc, even music production if thats of interest. All of these are for me, therefore I think a comparable sum of money on a souncard and some silencing measures are the better option, for me anyway. But perhaps the better psu of the squeezebox and its livingroom friendly aesthetic make it the audiophile choice.

Cheers,

Ross
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Old 18th October 2006, 05:03 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by I_Forgot
Have you looked at the Squueezebox or Transporter for playback? Both are quite good and eliminate the noise of the PC from the listening room. They also provide remote control for selection of music for playback.

Not yet. I'll have a look. THX
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Old 18th October 2006, 05:04 PM   #14
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xmcd would run on linux so asio support isnt an issue. Certainly JACK and alsa support are good to have on linux. xmcd is may be a bit out of date now, dont see any mention of JACK, not sure it is still an active project. Aqualung looks good. Amorak is very popular, and is actively developed.

There is apparently usb audio support under ALSA, but havnt got a usb device to check. Would be interesting if you tried your dddac with it.
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Old 18th October 2006, 05:22 PM   #15
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Let's dream a bit:

A small high-end audio Linux distribution wouldn't be a bad idea, IMHO.

Just pure playback.

Booting from memorystick or CD. The tracks are loaded with a nice player from a mounted harddrive. The player does full file buffering for playback.

A nice realtime kernel and applications stripped down to the absolute minimum to get maximum performance.

This shouldn't be too difficult!?

Everybody could use something like that. You wouldn't even have to reconfigure your PC for it.
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Old 18th October 2006, 07:15 PM   #16
Joe1976 is offline Joe1976  Thailand
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Firstly, I don't believe many CD players can compete with a PC or Mac, given that more and more studio work is now done with ProTools and similar setups on PCs and Macs. w.r.t DDDAC1543, I think we are seeing another example of the (devastating) discrepancy between expensive average-sounding comercial products and non-expensive but great sounding home brews - a discrepancy which surely these DIY forums thrive on.

I have an EMU 1212m running through a phase-aligned 3 way crossover, and 6 Gainclones, powering p.audio drivers. I also visit the local 'audiophile' stores from time to time, to listen to their vinyl collection. This is not an ideal, scientific, blind listening test, I know, but they do compare; my system's stereo imaging certainly isn't as good. But. The 1212m card is so much closer to a 'studio' sound than the audiophole CD players I have listened to...in fact, I would never have believed CD audio could sound so good.

I had never heard of the DDDAC1543. I will have to consider this as a future project. Many thanks! It would be good to compare the DDDAC1543 with the 1212m, since they are of similar price (depending on the components used in the DDDAC1543).

I also make electronic music using the 1212m, which uses the same DAC as the aforementioned ProTools. Has anyone had any luck producing music with the DDDAC1543 (I mean in terms of latency)?
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Old 18th October 2006, 07:30 PM   #17
phofman is offline phofman  Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally posted by soundcheck
Let's dream a bit:

A small high-end audio Linux distribution wouldn't be a bad idea, IMHO.

Just pure playback.

Booting from memorystick or CD. The tracks are loaded with a nice player from a mounted harddrive. The player does full file buffering for playback.

A nice realtime kernel and applications stripped down to the absolute minimum to get maximum performance.

This shouldn't be too difficult!?
www.linuxdevices.com reports frequently such devices from various manufacturers. It is already a reality. I am very excited about this trend.
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Old 18th October 2006, 08:46 PM   #18
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The pro audio and video industry set about adapting the PC to suit their needs. Reading through a lot of the posts here and in other places, it would seem the general idea here is to adapt audio to suit the PC world.
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Old 19th October 2006, 06:08 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally posted by rfbrw
...it would seem the general idea here is to adapt audio to suit the PC world.
Interesting... Can you explain it better?
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Old 19th October 2006, 08:41 AM   #20
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I think 'the dream' is very easily realised.

I posted a link to demudi before (in the open source audio thread, but the less said about that the better). It is a linux distribution optimised for pro audio work, low latency with most of the best and most stable linux audio applications. I have installed it before and used the live cd version, looks promising. I failed to get the live cd to boot off a usb pen, but I know its been done with other knoppix cds. I believe it is possible to strip out applications from live knoppix cd's as well, therefore reducing the amount of space taken up in RAM. SOny have used this in an experiemntal Hifi system. An embedded version for low spec machines is being developed at the moment. There is an Amorak live cd.

I spent a some time trying to find a way of getting all the applications I wanted to boot off a 1gb usb pen, but most live/mini distributions come with a limited repository of applications. Slax was the best I could find as anything in the slackware repository can be used, but this was still missing stuff like brutefir. Plenty of people have succeeded in making modules for slax. I believe this could be done but I lack the expertise at the moment. Slax can also be built from within windows and easily loaded onto a pen drive.

In the end I reached the conclusion that where I would be using a harddrive to store music, I might as well have the operating system on it as well, and save the effort of using the usb drive. might be slightly noisier with more hard drive activity, but there are plenty of cheap silencing external enclosures. Would still be nice to have a mini audio distro on a usb pen though.

Ubuntu is by far the easiest os to configure, you hardly even have to resort to the command line. ubuntu studio has lots of information about setting it up for improved audio performance. You simply remove programs to strip it down.

Good to hear some more positive reports about the emu 1212m. Is the crossover implemented on the cards dsp, or are you doing this in software? Im not sure how easy it would be to implement a crossover through a usb device. I havnt noticed any more than two channels being used in diy, but this may just be preference. more than one usb device would be difficult to sync.

Cheers,

Ross
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