Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Digital Line Level DACs, Digital Crossovers, Equalizers, etc.

Building the ultimate NOS DAC using TDA1541A
Building the ultimate NOS DAC using TDA1541A
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 27th June 2007, 09:55 AM   #1581
justblair is offline justblair  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
justblair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
I would recommend moving to a RAID setup if you are worried about losing data. With Raid, 2 or more drives are used together to make up a single logical drive.

If you use Raid 5. You have a very safe option for Data. if say you have 3 hard, 2 are used for storing data, the third for redundancy.

If one drive is to fail, the redundancy data can be used to rebuild the data from the failed drive onto its replacement. Very usefull.

The more drives you use the more economical the setup, as one redundancy drive is required.

i.e.
3*40gb Drive = 80gb
5*40gb Drive = 160gb

Hardware Raid is best, but Windows has software raid built into the modern operating systems. The disadvantage is that you have to have the raid array on different drives to the OS in the latter.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th June 2007, 10:24 AM   #1582
arielpuri is offline arielpuri  Slovenia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Hi Ecdesigns,

is USB 1.x enough quick for DIx DACs?

I am thinking to go on mini ITX (CarPC) with Linux OS.

regards
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th June 2007, 03:12 PM   #1583
Christer is offline Christer  Sweden
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Ecdesigns,

Yes, write errors do occur, of course. I never said anything else. My point was that from my experience, write errors so severe that the ECC info is not sufficient to correct them seem to have been extremely rare, if occuring at all.

If data integrity is extremely important, there are further measures one can take. Disk redundancy in the form of RAID arrangements, as somone suggested, is probably the most common way to go. One could also test read every sector after writing it, but that would waste too much time on most systems, and is probably only used in systems with extreme requirements for reliability.

The bottom line is, of course, that write errors on hard disks is probably so rare that we can forget about them if the purpose was to store audio.

The second bottom line is, disk crashes happen and cause a lot more headache than one or a few write errors would, so always back up important data regularly.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th June 2007, 04:32 PM   #1584
anatech is offline anatech  Canada
diyAudio Moderator
 
anatech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Georgetown, On
Building the ultimate NOS DAC using TDA1541A
Hi everyone,
Storing and playing a music collection would be expected to last for many years. The investment in your music files and time to rebuild them would be enormous.

I personally do not recommend RAID5 setups for this. Most people could not set up the drive farm properly from a power supply / cooling standpoint. The cost is yet another issue.

What would I recommend? RAID2 using JFS (Journaled File System). This is only drive mirroring and it's very effective. I've run systems like this and this has saved my behind more than once. This was available with OS/2 Advanced Server 5 many years ago. A Linux distribution would be the most reliable for this purpose these days. Linux would also afford the very best virus protection with it's file permissions structure. Windows is just now getting to a point where others were over 10 years ago. With the built in ability to snoop your files that Microsoft always includes in their OS, they will always be less secure.

That's my take on it, for what it's worth.

-Chris
__________________
"Just because you can, doesn't mean you should" my Wife
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th June 2007, 04:49 PM   #1585
justblair is offline justblair  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
justblair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Quote:
Originally posted by anatech
Hi everyone,
Storing and playing a music collection would be expected to last for many years. The investment in your music files and time to rebuild them would be enormous.

I personally do not recommend RAID5 setups for this. Most people could not set up the drive farm properly from a power supply / cooling standpoint. The cost is yet another issue.

What would I recommend? RAID2 using JFS (Journaled File System). This is only drive mirroring and it's very effective. I've run systems like this and this has saved my behind more than once. This was available with OS/2 Advanced Server 5 many years ago. A Linux distribution would be the most reliable for this purpose these days. Linux would also afford the very best virus protection with it's file permissions structure. Windows is just now getting to a point where others were over 10 years ago. With the built in ability to snoop your files that Microsoft always includes in their OS, they will always be less secure.

That's my take on it, for what it's worth.

-Chris
I dont think that raid 5 is that hard to set up effectively, however mirroring is effective as well. As far as setting up a moderate sized drive farm.... Its not rocket science, HD's ar not power hungry enough to defeat even modestly equiped PSU's and a medium quality or higher PC case will have plenty of drive bays, and a reasonably intelligent (though not optimum) cooling arrangement.

Mirroring is certainly simple enough, though it is more expensive per GB once you reach a certain size of data storage.

Anyway i suspect i am about to get my knuckles rapped for going too far OT.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th June 2007, 06:28 PM   #1586
anatech is offline anatech  Canada
diyAudio Moderator
 
anatech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Georgetown, On
Building the ultimate NOS DAC using TDA1541A
Hi justblair,
Hey, it's "just me" here.

Most people are unaware and unlikely to take all the steps needed. They are setting up a music server, not a workstation. So they will not invest in the proper equipment to do the job.

Drive mirroring is cheaper still. It runs on IDE or SATA, not just SCSI. Cheap and cheerful. Also, easier on the power supply on start up and the cooling than 5 bays of whining drives. I would tend to put the OS on a smaller boot drive, not on the array.

-Chris
__________________
"Just because you can, doesn't mean you should" my Wife
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th June 2007, 06:47 PM   #1587
nicoch58 is offline nicoch58  Europe
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
the new sandisk solid flash hd?

no notor- silent- no hot-no failure hope!
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th June 2007, 07:09 PM   #1588
Christer is offline Christer  Sweden
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Quote:
Originally posted by nicoch46
the new sandisk solid flash hd?

no notor- silent- no hot-no failure hope!
And no space. They are still small and expensive compared to ordinary hard disks.

They also have limited number of writes, but that is probably of less concern for a music server, where we mostly write data once and keep it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th June 2007, 07:44 PM   #1589
nicoch58 is offline nicoch58  Europe
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
SanDisk SSD delivers an outstanding two million hour mean time to failure (MTTF)1 rate (is not pendrive!)
64gb.....not bat and this is only beginning
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th June 2007, 08:59 PM   #1590
Christer is offline Christer  Sweden
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Quote:
Originally posted by nicoch46
SanDisk SSD delivers an outstanding two million hour mean time to failure (MTTF)1 rate (is not pendrive!)
64gb.....not bat and this is only beginning

64 MB, yes for solid state hard "disks" that uses multiple flash chips. Of course one can use any number of flash chips to get the desired capcity. Price still has to drop to be competitive, but of course it will in a few years time.

The MTTF figure most probably does not refer to read- and write errors, but to device failures. I am in no way en expert on flash memories, but according to what I have read they do have a maximum number of writes (or rather erases) of between 10 000 and 1000 000 times per cell, which in practice means per block. Often algorithms are used to allocate free blocks for writing that minimizes the maximum number of writes to any block. But eventually some blocks will start to fail due to too many writes, and the available amount of space will decrease. This might not be a problem for most storage applications. It could be a problem if using the flash disk for swap space and other frequent-write applications.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Building the ultimate NOS DAC using TDA1541AHide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 11:09 PM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 15.00%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2017 diyAudio
Wiki