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Old 14th November 2011, 12:46 PM   #121
Bunpei is offline Bunpei  Japan
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As jcarr said, the vertical axis of the graph is the "phase angle" (theta, θ)
between voltage and current. You can measure the value easily using a LCR meter.

A group of advanced audiophiles in my hometown region is recently establishing such an empirical rule that "a capacitor that has a good phase vs. frequency plot yields a good sonic effect both on decoupling and coupling purposes in terms of unclouded sound."
In this context, "a good phase plot" means;
1. Fluctuation of phase value is small
2. No large phase value change appears in audio frequency range

Even if you feel anything doubtful on my report, I will not ram the capacitor or the empirical rule into your throat.(The capacitor is too large to swallow down, actually.) You have your thoughts and your ways.

I have one thing to make it clear. I have not removed any capacitors originally on board on the Buffalo II main board. A set of ceramic capacitors remains there.
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Old 14th November 2011, 01:17 PM   #122
Coris is offline Coris  Norway
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunpei View Post
As jcarr said, the vertical axis of the graph is the "phase angle" (theta, θ)
between voltage and current. You can measure the value easily using a LCR meter.

A group of advanced audiophiles in my hometown region is recently establishing such an empirical rule that "a capacitor that has a good phase vs. frequency plot yields a good sonic effect both on decoupling and coupling purposes in terms of unclouded sound."
In this context, "a good phase plot" means;
1. Fluctuation of phase value is small
2. No large phase value change appears in audio frequency range

Even if you feel anything doubtful on my report, I will not ram the capacitor or the empirical rule into your throat.(The capacitor is too large to swallow down, actually.) You have your thoughts and your ways.

I have one thing to make it clear. I have not removed any capacitors originally on board on the Buffalo II main board. A set of ceramic capacitors remains there.
I do not doubt your report and I do not feel like so... I`m just thinking and trying to find out why so an so... Explanations... That`s all.
By the way, thanks for your explanations.
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Old 15th November 2011, 08:36 AM   #123
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Bunpei, if I have offended you, I apologise.

Maybe I was too harsh in my comments. Having been in the electronic industry for many years and now being in the academic "world" have made me a bit skeptical when I see such a flat line among other "normal" curves.



Best regards,
S.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunpei View Post
As jcarr said, the vertical axis of the graph is the "phase angle" (theta, θ)
between voltage and current. You can measure the value easily using a LCR meter.

A group of advanced audiophiles in my hometown region is recently establishing such an empirical rule that "a capacitor that has a good phase vs. frequency plot yields a good sonic effect both on decoupling and coupling purposes in terms of unclouded sound."
In this context, "a good phase plot" means;
1. Fluctuation of phase value is small
2. No large phase value change appears in audio frequency range

Even if you feel anything doubtful on my report, I will not ram the capacitor or the empirical rule into your throat.(The capacitor is too large to swallow down, actually.) You have your thoughts and your ways.

I have one thing to make it clear. I have not removed any capacitors originally on board on the Buffalo II main board. A set of ceramic capacitors remains there.
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Old 16th November 2011, 01:35 PM   #124
Bunpei is offline Bunpei  Japan
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Dear Coris and staccatiss,

Please do not be worry so much. I don't mind.
Even if the effect of the capacitors are out of your orthodox theory, I'd like to recommend you try those.

By the way, as staccatiss reported his comment on TPA transformer I/V thread, I think synchronous MCLK feed is very effective either.
Coris, why don't you try that method in your system?
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Old 16th November 2011, 01:54 PM   #125
Coris is offline Coris  Norway
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunpei View Post
Dear Coris and staccatiss,

Please do not be worry so much. I don't mind.
Even if the effect of the capacitors are out of your orthodox theory, I'd like to recommend you try those.

By the way, as staccatiss reported his comment on TPA transformer I/V thread, I think synchronous MCLK feed is very effective either.
Coris, why don't you try that method in your system?
Hi Bunpei
You know, I didn`t succeed yet to put together my Buffalo system... so, that because I didn`t tried yet the synchronous clock. My actually system do not permit me this, or all is too complicated. I will try it... as soon as I would have the possibility.
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Old 27th November 2011, 03:19 PM   #126
Bunpei is offline Bunpei  Japan
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I have tried a collective set of ceramic capacitors ( 100 microF x 10 ) at last.
Its sonic impression I felt was "clear". However, among Sanyo OS-CON, Panasonic electrolytic capacitor, a collective set of Tantalum capacitors, CDE film capacitor and a collective set of ceramic capacitors, I like the giant film capacitor manufactured by Cornell Dubilier Electronics best. (Naturally, each type has each characteristic.)
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Old 27th November 2011, 09:51 PM   #127
Coris is offline Coris  Norway
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunpei View Post
I have tried a collective set of ceramic capacitors ( 100 microF x 10 ) at last.
Its sonic impression I felt was "clear". However, among Sanyo OS-CON, Panasonic electrolytic capacitor, a collective set of Tantalum capacitors, CDE film capacitor and a collective set of ceramic capacitors, I like the giant film capacitor manufactured by Cornell Dubilier Electronics best. (Naturally, each type has each characteristic.)
Thanks for your feedback! Good to know that are different sonic results in this case.

In the last time I found out about something interesting... Is about I/V & final stage (stereo) for ESS9018. I will search a little bit more before publish something.
Do you use in your system TPA I/V & final stage, or something else? For moment I use/run my own one...

Last edited by Coris; 27th November 2011 at 09:55 PM.
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Old 27th November 2011, 10:05 PM   #128
NicMac is offline NicMac  Italy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coris View Post
Do you use in your system TPA I/V & final stage, or something else? For moment I use/run my own one...
Please share
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Old 28th November 2011, 03:12 PM   #129
Bunpei is offline Bunpei  Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coris View Post
... Do you use in your system TPA I/V & final stage, or something else? ...
As I favor a minimalist approach, I use no I/V stage. My way of monitoring is connecting a tweaked Etymotic Research ER-4S earphones to a balanced analog output of Buffalo II or Buffalo III board. Each earphone drivers is said to have 5 ohm impedance and a variable resister is inserted in serial. I believe no visible coupling capacitors are in the signal path. Therefore, I think I can monitor a raw characteristic of the DAC chip. (One exception is possible effects of the variable resister.)
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Old 28th November 2011, 03:23 PM   #130
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Quote:
(One exception is possible effects of the variable resister.)
...and a highly inductive/reactive load (headphone coils).
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