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Old 27th February 2011, 10:12 AM   #21
hifiZen is offline hifiZen  Canada
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Oh,the fibre works just fine, and has for some time now... That's what was used for the idf 2009 demo, and the original reason it was called Light Peak. Copper has more technical challenges, in fact. So it isn't a question of making this work over fibre. No, the reasons for copper are rather more mundane - consider that this is a consumer interface, not the traditional fibre application (commercial grade components, fixed installation, etc.).
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Old 27th February 2011, 10:39 AM   #22
SunRa is offline SunRa  Romania
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but if intel couldnt make 10gbs work on fiber, what makes you think they can do 40? not doubting, just wondering where that info is coming from?
Anandtech is a good source for Intel news: First off, Light Peak speeds remain the same as we've previously seen at 10 gigabits/s, though opportunity to scale to 100 gigabits/s remains a promise for the future.

Light Peak Demo

I guess wiki also throws in some numbers too regarding this..
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Old 27th February 2011, 12:19 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by hifiZen View Post
Oh,the fibre works just fine, and has for some time now... That's what was used for the idf 2009 demo, and the original reason it was called Light Peak. Copper has more technical challenges, in fact. So it isn't a question of making this work over fibre. No, the reasons for copper are rather more mundane - consider that this is a consumer interface, not the traditional fibre application (commercial grade components, fixed installation, etc.).
+1

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Old 27th February 2011, 02:39 PM   #24
qusp is offline qusp  Australia
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that appears to be pretty old info and nothing happened with it. they needed to team with apple to bring it to market, if they didnt, then they wouldnt have; so there must have been some sort of issue making it work reliably in an environment that isnt an isolated demo machine. the lightpeak cable in that pic does not look like it would cause any issues to the consumer, just looks like a regular thinnish white cable. so there has to be some other reason

i do believe that fiber can do those speeds of course, because its part of the internet backbone, although most is still copper

Last edited by qusp; 27th February 2011 at 02:43 PM.
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Old 27th February 2011, 07:16 PM   #25
hifiZen is offline hifiZen  Canada
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qusp: Bingo. Getting new tech out of the lab and on to the street often involves solving a lot of practical issues. A telecom tech expects to test and troubleshoot each link, and once that link is up, it won't be touched for months or years. But high speed fibre optics don't mix so well with the dirty environment, carefree treatment, and high expectations of the consumer...
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Old 28th February 2011, 02:37 AM   #26
00940 is online now 00940  Belgium
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Neo2k: indeed mate, thats exactly what i mean, so exciting!! wow i bet there is all manner of companies around the planet right now with their head in their hands after spending money and time on development of next gen usb and proprietary transport protocols; only to be wiped out in one swoop. usb 3.0 of course through an adapter will still just work, but it wont be the industry leading thing they planned, and will likely be ignored by the neophytes they were chasing.
Maybe not... this thunderbolt thing will be very exciting at the fall of 2012 at the earliest (spring 2012 to see PC laptops equipped with it, a few months of lag to get enough interesting peripherals). In the meantime, USB3 will rule the scene.

What I would expect in the future are computers with one external thunderbolt port (for displays, high performances HDDs and some various high performance applications) and a bunch of USB3 ports for everything else (thumbdrives, printers, keyboards/mices, legacy devices and so on).
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Old 28th February 2011, 12:31 PM   #27
qusp is offline qusp  Australia
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erm the mac already has it on their latest model. i use macs. there is also already a few peripherals ready to go. it wont take long for there to be everything i need. i'm waiting for a mac mini with it to run my crossover, i would expect an updated model in the next couple of months. so i will buy mac mini and thunderbolt ssd drive

usb3 ports will probably still remain to support outdated hardware ;D but it isnt even needed, the adapters are also ready to go it seems.

Last edited by qusp; 28th February 2011 at 12:34 PM.
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Old 28th February 2011, 01:15 PM   #28
qusp is offline qusp  Australia
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Originally Posted by hifiZen View Post
qusp: Bingo. Getting new tech out of the lab and on to the street often involves solving a lot of practical issues. A telecom tech expects to test and troubleshoot each link, and once that link is up, it won't be touched for months or years. But high speed fibre optics don't mix so well with the dirty environment, carefree treatment, and high expectations of the consumer...
yeah youre probably right, the optical link will still expect to find use in enterprise and video/film editing networks. major bonus if wanting it to be a link to end all links is the 10w of power that isnt possible over fiber
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Old 28th February 2011, 01:50 PM   #29
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I know that Macbooks Pro have it (why do you think I wrote "pc laptops" ? ).

If you were a company doing peripherals what would you rather develop for today ? The widespread USB3 or that port that can only be found on a very small share of the market ? Consider also that your USB3 device will still eventually be useful in a Thunderbolt world (just slap a thunderbolt to usb endpoint before it) and that, for many peripherals, a bandwith of 5Gb will be just as good as a bandwith of 10.

We might get some thunderbolt peripherals before 2012, sure, but probably way overpriced (the usual "designed for Apple" markup), restricted to some high end applications (extremely fast storage, studio tools, etc) and without much competition. For the two years to come, the real money is to be made on USB3 not on Thunderbolt. Afterwards, USB3, with its easy backwards compatibility, will probably be entrenched for a big section of the market and I don't see it being simply dropped. Most of the peripherals produced today are still USB2. They won't be "outdated" for consumers or entreprises before 3 to 5 years.

Adapters There's nothing more inconvenient than adapters (probably one reason DisplayPort is still to this day almost never found alone on any PC laptop). The problem with Thunderbolt is the requirement to have thunderbolt controllers on both sides of the chain (source and peripheral). For the vast majority of the peripherals, it makes more sense (bluntly said, it'd be cheaper and more convenient) to have the thunderbolt to usb adapters in the computer itself that in either an adapter or in the peripherals.

This said, I'll be happy to have such port available when I replace my current computer, in two or three years' time.
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Old 28th February 2011, 02:30 PM   #30
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I heard one tech commentator imagine a power connector (mag-safe for Apple) that has Thunderbolt integrated, allowing for easy one-connection laptop docking. As is, it could facilitate two connection docking. This is the only compelling use-case I see for Thunderbolt right now.
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