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-   -   Clock Jitter Cleaners (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/digital-line-level/131666-clock-jitter-cleaners.html)

coloradosound 20th October 2008 07:43 PM

Clock Jitter Cleaners
 
Any thoughts?
http://elecp-media.com/portal/wts/cc...kAL6SzVbNFw6Sh

National's site:
http://www.national.com/products/catalog.do
Click on
Clock and Timing

tjt111012 23rd October 2008 01:56 PM

it sounds like a good idea,
does anyone try before?
:confused:

jcx 23rd October 2008 04:36 PM

the phase noise plots at audio frequency offsets are worse than good quality Xtal osc

Guido Tent 23rd October 2008 09:41 PM

Re: Clock Jitter Cleaners
 
Quote:

Originally posted by coloradosound
Any thoughts?
http://elecp-media.com/portal/wts/cc...kAL6SzVbNFw6Sh

National's site:
http://www.national.com/products/catalog.do
Click on
Clock and Timing


nice for communication systems where they start integrating the measured jitter at 12 kHz. No use for serious audio

avoid them, don't spend a single second

best

rossl 23rd October 2008 11:33 PM

I didn't study the entire set of data sheets. I looked through one of them.

I think it would be hard to do what most of us would want. I would want to use a "jitter cleaner" to fix up a received SPDIF stream.

Aside from the problem of the jitter below 12KHz that the other posters have noticed, the chips have registers that need to be set to tell the chip what frequency the received clock is. You will need a micro to configure the part.

I think you would have to use one of the verious SPDIF receiver chips in software mode. Use one that will give you a status reading of the locked sample rate.

Then you will need the micro to read the SPDIF rate from the receiver and configure the jitter cleaner part for the correct sample rate. Every time the SPDIF receiver locks, the jitter cleaner will be re-configured.

The package is a 48 pin LLP, which is not DIY friendly. You will have a hard time hand-soldering this.

It sounds like a lot of development to me for a questionable amount of improvment.

Guido Tent 24th October 2008 07:28 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by rossl
I didn't study the entire set of data sheets. I looked through one of them.

I think it would be hard to do what most of us would want. I would want to use a "jitter cleaner" to fix up a received SPDIF stream.

Aside from the problem of the jitter below 12KHz that the other posters have noticed, the chips have registers that need to be set to tell the chip what frequency the received clock is. You will need a micro to configure the part.

I think you would have to use one of the verious SPDIF receiver chips in software mode. Use one that will give you a status reading of the locked sample rate.

Then you will need the micro to read the SPDIF rate from the receiver and configure the jitter cleaner part for the correct sample rate. Every time the SPDIF receiver locks, the jitter cleaner will be re-configured.

The package is a 48 pin LLP, which is not DIY friendly. You will have a hard time hand-soldering this.

It sounds like a lot of development to me for a questionable amount of improvment.

Take an average Input receiver like CS8412 or 14 and combine it with a decent crystal based VCXO like

http://www.tentlabs.com/Products/DAC...DAC/index.html

30dB in jitter reduction is not questionable......

best

QSerraTico_Tico 24th October 2008 08:30 AM

Re: Clock Jitter Cleaners
 
Quote:

Originally posted by coloradosound
Any thoughts?
http://elecp-media.com/portal/wts/cc...kAL6SzVbNFw6Sh

National's site:
http://www.national.com/products/catalog.do
Click on
Clock and Timing


How about the MAX9485?
http://www.maxim-ic.com/quick_view2.cfm/qv_pk/4421
:cool:

rossl 24th October 2008 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Guido Tent


Take an average Input receiver like CS8412 or 14 and combine it with a decent crystal based VCXO like

http://www.tentlabs.com/Products/DAC...DAC/index.html

30dB in jitter reduction is not questionable......

best

How do you get it to lock on and clean the jitter on all of 44.1K, 48K, 88.2K, 96K, 176.4K, and 192K ?

Guido Tent 24th October 2008 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by rossl


How do you get it to lock on and clean the jitter on all of 44.1K, 48K, 88.2K, 96K, 176.4K, and 192K ?


Not, there's no free lunch, at least not for 209 euro, but you might like this one

http://www.grimmaudio.com/cc1grimm.htm

best

muckrake 26th October 2008 10:33 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Guido Tent
[B]


Not, there's no free lunch, at least not for 209 euro
209 euro? I can't understand why people would pay anything of the sort for a boutique clock instead of realizing if they'd only check outside the audio specialty suppliers they could find something for a fraction of the cost. Example quote I got from a manufacturer:

Fundamental: 24.576 MHz
RMS jitter 10 Hz-20 MHz: 0.25 ps (typ) 0.3 ps (max)
Phase noise at offset: 10Hz -100dB, 100Hz -130dB, 1kHz -155dB, 10kHz - 170dB, 100kHz -175dB (typ, max 3 Hz higher)
Price: $20

That's per clock for 100 quantity, about double if only 10. I was going to organize a group order on head-fi but other stuff came up (a 70 hour a week job). I'm sure other manufacturers can provide similar clocks at similar prices

It's pretty clear to me that most people seem to not realize that one doesn't have to spend ludicrous sums of money to get decent audio components. Just don't spend it with the suppliers that charge a multiple of what it's worth--shop around, going outside the circle of audiophile pawn shop masters!


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