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Old 11th August 2006, 08:28 PM   #21
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I started with the Norton wet sanding 600 grit paper, but stopped because it's raining... I stopped sanding always in the same direction also. Now, the only thing is that I don't see the 400 scratches anymore, but I see that I sanded in the same direction. (Some areas are darker than others, is it important to remove all this?)

A few months ago, when I disassembled the amp, I used fine steel wool, then 1000 grit to remove the old dust (gummy), so scratches were almost all gone before I started. There are some solder spots that are pretty hard to remove too...
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Old 11th August 2006, 09:12 PM   #22
poobah is offline poobah  United States
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Try some WD40 (light oil) instead of water... it will speed things.

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Old 11th August 2006, 09:26 PM   #23
amt is offline amt  United States
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I hope you are using the wet/dry wet. The efficiency and "cut" of the abrasive is 5X better when used with water. The best is with running water and okay is in a bucket. The water carries away the removed metal and keeps the paper from loading up. When doing steel, dry it off immediately after ending a session. I use a heat gun to ensure all the moisture is removed. If the steel alloy is very hard, you may need to do the initial removal with a sander. A small finish sander(random orbital) works fairly well. I use a pheumatic in water so I can avoid dust and speed up the process. Its a bit messy though.

And if you dont have a rubber sanding block, get one. It is the only way to go. It will make your flat surfaces flatter and more uniform and really saves your fingers and hands stress. It also allow you to apply more pressure than you can with your fingers.

In order to ensure all the deep scratches are removed, you can sand perpenticular to the grain of the previous grit. If you dont, its quite hard to see the small scratches you missed when they are parallel with the next finer grit. Just go slowly and look very carefully.

amt
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Old 11th August 2006, 10:06 PM   #24
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I use it wet with dishwashing soap.
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Old 12th August 2006, 12:24 AM   #25
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Quote:
Try some WD40 (light oil) instead of water... it will speed things.
Who doesn't know what WD40 is?

Quote:
And if you dont have a rubber sanding block, get one. It is the only way to go. It will make your flat surfaces flatter and more uniform and really saves your fingers and hands stress. It also allow you to apply more pressure than you can with your fingers.
I have one(Well, it's plastic with a rubber pad between the plastic and paper), but the bottom of the chassis has too much corners (Tube sockets for high tubes are placed with an angle, some places are bent)

Quote:
In order to ensure all the deep scratches are removed, you can sand perpenticular to the grain of the previous grit. If you dont, its quite hard to see the small scratches you missed when they are parallel with the next finer grit. Just go slowly and look very carefully.
With the 600 I went circularly(And w/o block). I think I'll go in a straight line with the 800 again, so if I see circular scratches, I should sand that part.

I use a cheap rectangle aluminum plate (The ones you can find in 5 packs made of heavy-duty aluminum paper)
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Old 15th August 2006, 03:35 AM   #26
KBK is offline KBK  Canada
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Artist shop

Tri-Art brand Artist paints. Highest level of pigmentation and quality of pigmentation than the restof the industry, by a factor of 2, minimum. That includes any car coatings, or mil-spec, etc. Us the Tri-art 'topcoat', which is based on the same resin for the clearcoat used on BMW's.

How do I know? I sit in the factory, every day.
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Old 15th August 2006, 04:16 AM   #27
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Where do I find this? And there's no spray paint!
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Old 15th August 2006, 04:45 AM   #28
KBK is offline KBK  Canada
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If you are in mo-rea-all, check out curry's artist supplies, they carry it. Some absolutely stunning and wicked colors. tansparents, etc. So pigmented and colorful, you have a difficult time resisting the urge to eat it, or just dig your hands into the jar. We have 400L+ batches and the like,and man, it looks just like the most isanely colorful candy you have ever laid eyes on. Some of the colors are so wickedly intense in their pigmentation, that we have a hard time not climbing into the vat and swimming around. They are so strong, they assult your eyeballs. 100% serious on that. We are the ONLY company in the industry that do things to this level. The Tri-art 'true-color' line is the be all - end all of colored coatings.

When you open a can of artist paint, you 'nice color' when you open a jar of Tri-art product you go 'HOLY CRAP'!, because your eyeballs were just slapped with an intensity you have never seen before.

It is water based Acrylic paint.

The BMW clearcoat, or in this case, the Tri-art 'topcoat' is a water based acrylic-urethane. Hard as rock when it dries, at the same time it is very flexable. Takes to polishing very well, just like a BMW.

If to be used on a speaker, thin with 50% clean distilled water, then spray, thin coats, sand between them, etc. That's the topcoat.

For example, you can do wicked things like a metallic red orange flaked, blue on the highlights,and overall..transparent blood red--with a jet black base..and then, the whole thing with a piano finish.... Just mix up some colors. I've done some insane looking stuff with the paint.

As they are water based, they take along time to dry properly, but they don't kill you with outgassing. Experiment first. Warning, not cheap!
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Old 15th August 2006, 05:22 AM   #29
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Quote:
then spray, thin coats,
How? Does it mean that I would need to buy a compressor and gun?

I don't think I'll go with very flashy colors since it doesn't fit with old tube equipment. If I can find a nice black maybe I'll go for it.
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Old 15th August 2006, 09:11 AM   #30
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Hi KBK,
would you like to create a Wiki on surface prep and painting?

I think more than myself would be grateful.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
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