A 'how to' for High Gloss Finishing - Page 31 - diyAudio
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Old 21st February 2011, 04:12 PM   #301
Renron is offline Renron  United States
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An ionizer simply adds a charge(d) particle to an atom / molecule. That charge allows it to attract or be attracted to, other particles. This cause it to "bond" and not freely associate. Charged dust molecules "bond" with each other and form longer chains which cause them to be effected by gravity sooner, and / or allow them to be caught in "Hepa" filters more readily. Hepa filters work better when they are semi-dirty and charged with ionized particles.
From my mold classes........

Ron
(I don't eat mushrooms since this class)
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Old 21st February 2011, 05:24 PM   #302
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There are also ESD ionizers that are designed to neutralise any static charges on particles.
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Old 21st February 2011, 07:13 PM   #303
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Continuously filtering the air, like they do in a real paint booth, is the best way to keep airborne dust out of the paint.
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Old 22nd February 2011, 07:15 AM   #304
jerryo is offline jerryo  Isle of Man
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For me it is a waste of time doing the "Piano Black" finish, however I know that it is a rite of passage to some in order to prove that they can do it. Life is too short to spend so much time on this sort of finish. Mirror black finishes show up every fingerprint and speck of dust and scratch and unless you use some sort of 2-pack catalytic paint which has some degree of hardness you will always have to take great care in how you handle your speakers and how you clean them.
(Bearing in mind that I have been a professional decorator for 28 years and have done more sanding down of paint and wood finishes than you can possibly imagine and therefore have developed a degree of antipathy towards the sanding down process)
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Old 22nd February 2011, 02:57 PM   #305
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJL21193 View Post
Continuously filtering the air, like they do in a real paint booth, is the best way to keep airborne dust out of the paint.
+1
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Old 3rd August 2011, 10:53 AM   #306
Billyo is offline Billyo  Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShinOBIWAN View Post
So my recommendation would be to have a very good(near perfect) primed surface that you've sanded flat .
Hi all,

I've read through most of this excellent thread and am currently applying the primer to my new cabinets and sanding back.

My question is, how "perfect" does the primed surface need to be?

I'm having trouble sanding back and eliminating the pits, without finding I'm going through the primer altogether and exposing the MDF substrate.

Because the primer is so fine - it comes out of the spraycan almost like a vaporous mist - it never really builds up any significant thickness. Its also devilishly hard to tell where its been sprayed on and where it hasn't.

By the way... I'm already completely amazed that someone like me, who has only ever slappped paint onto walls - can follow these instructions and fairly easily achieve what is starting to look like a pro finish! This thread delivers!

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Old 3rd August 2011, 11:23 AM   #307
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billyo View Post
My question is, how "perfect" does the primed surface need to be?
Hi Billyo

It needs to be pretty good. I get mine virtually perfect and it makes the other steps easier. The thing you want to avoid is exposed mdf. What your aiming for is a smooth glass like finish covering the whole of your enclosure.

Quote:
I'm having trouble sanding back and eliminating the pits, without finding I'm going through the primer altogether and exposing the MDF substrate.
You could try dry sanding if your encountering this issue, wet sanding will cause all sort of problems otherwise.

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Because the primer is so fine - it comes out of the spraycan almost like a vaporous mist - it never really builds up any significant thickness. Its also devilishly hard to tell where its been sprayed on and where it hasn't.
Be methodical in the way you spray. Consistent horizontal strokes starting from the top of the work and overlapping by about 50% is good for me. This way you don't need to see where you've already been.
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Old 3rd August 2011, 01:58 PM   #308
Renron is offline Renron  United States
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Billyo,
spray a slightly thicker coat of primer/shellac. If you first spray horizontal, with 50% overlap strokes, then vertical with 50% overlaps, you'll have a higher build which won't sand through as easily. 150 -180 grit wet/dry on a sanding block. Watch for burn through on the corners/edges.
Tip:
spray the outside corners first, then spray the bulk/faces of the project with overlapping strokes, that way you are sure you have enough primer on the edges where paint is thin to begin with. Be patient with yourself and go sloooowww. It's a long process that doesn't take well to being rushed.
Are you using a W/B or Oil for the top coat?
Ron
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Old 3rd August 2011, 02:38 PM   #309
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I might have to give it a go, it seems harder to find Glatex 8 these days. A two part acrylic I love, it even comes in some rad colours. It totaly plasticises the outside of the wood and is so watertight they use it to seal woodwork on yachts. I've had some outstanding results just useing a high density foam roller. Also what is great about it is that the sanding period comes pretty soon after applying, but it is also quite short. Sanding afterwards makes the clear turn a slight gray, anyway, you can see it if you try it, so if you ever find it, follow the instructions on the can or else....

I need to do a high gloss finish on the faces of the boxes I will use for my goodmans.
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Old 3rd August 2011, 03:01 PM   #310
GM is online now GM  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billyo View Post
Because the primer is so fine - it comes out of the spraycan almost like a vaporous mist..............
It's been decades since I did any fine finishes, but primer, even spray cans [typically Krylon brand], was anything but 'fine'. Hopefully, the 'greenies' haven't gutted it. Regardless, conventional wisdom dictates shooting several coats of a dark primer first, let dry, then only as many coats of a light color primer for it to look uniform and block sand down till you start seeing the dark peek through, stop, clean/tack rag it and shoot some more dark, etc. and at some point you'll get a glass-like, uniform solid dark color after sanding off all of the latest coat. You should never sand down to the substrate. If this is a problem, then it needs [more] leveling/smoothing over before priming. If your finish color needs a light primer base, then reverse the color pattern.

Some folks do a so-so prep job and use many blocked/hand rubbed/whatever color coats, but IME only very high solids finish coatings can match a proper prep job [learned this the hard way doing a hand rubbed black lacquer finish on a '23 'T' bucket roadster, starting over after 27 coats still didn't look completely glass-like], so labor and budget wise it's a 'pay me now or pay me more later' situation.

GM
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