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Long Bevel cuts
Long Bevel cuts
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Old 22nd October 2017, 05:23 PM   #11
Kyngfish is offline Kyngfish  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimbro View Post
This thread needs to be moved to construction tips. That said the problem with doing bevels, rabbets,or dados on a table saw is that plywood is warped and needs to be pressed securely to the table or the joints will be sloppy. I love my table saw and it's the most used tool in my shop however if I were just getting started and just wanted to build speaker boxes I would get a standard circular saw or a track saw (but $$) and a 1/2" router. That way you can clamp the plywood down to a workbench to flatten it as you work. You need the router to cut holes anyway.
Wasn’t even aware of these. Track saw looks like a winner and Makita makes a decent one.
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Old 22nd October 2017, 06:36 PM   #12
simon7000 is offline simon7000  United States
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Rule of thumb, buy the cheap tool first, if it shows you promise buy a good ane and Craig's list the cheap one.
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Old 22nd October 2017, 07:00 PM   #13
phase is offline phase  United States
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For cabinet work, I would also recommend the hand held saw, with a clamped-on guide like this;
Johnson 98 in. Aluminum Cutting Guide-J4900 - The Home Depot
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Old 23rd October 2017, 12:27 AM   #14
MrBoat is offline MrBoat  United States
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Router, router table, a good fence with feather boards and jigs can add a lot of diversity to a shop. A hand power planer yet another. I find Bosch to be about the best all around for the money, really. Other brands like Dewalt and Makita have their places but it's usually in the nit pickiest of preferential differences.

Table saw is a luxury that is barely realized without a few essential jigs and a well designed out-feed, or even an infeed table if one works alone with large panels a lot.
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Old 23rd October 2017, 02:20 PM   #15
paul burchell is offline paul burchell  Canada
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I would buy a stationary table saw first, it can handle the bulk of your work in a wood shop. Feather boards, strait edges,jigs and good tecnique can fix imperfections in the material. One cut with a skill saw usually makes a full sheet managable on the tablesaw. If you wood is that warped that you cant hold it flat on the saw to cut a dato maybe you should rethink the material you are using.
Althou its not my fav stationary tool i still think it is the most versatile of tools and the first one most wood shops should have.
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Old 24th October 2017, 04:07 PM   #16
ilardi is offline ilardi  United States
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I started building speakers over 30 years ago using just a handheld drill, a circular saw, an accurate, 9 foot long straightedge, (before track saws were being widely hawked) and a router. So it can be done, but it is suboptimal from a speed and accuracy standpoint. You will need a circular saw to break down a 4 x 8 panel. (If you are only doing panel cuts consider a cordless). Note, however, that I consider the circular saw to be the most dangerous of the two dozen or so power tools I have in my shop. Use it with care.

But, if you are at all serious about woodworking, buy a table saw (and if you value your fingers, consider a Saw Stop).

I bought a table saw when I bought a house. I used it to build an extension to the house, a bathroom, a kitchen and more speakers. It made accuracy so much easier. Get yourself infeed and outfeed roller stands, or a helper. (An outfeed table is a nice luxury but the roller stand will do. I used one for years). My first table saw was an inexpensive Craftsman. It served me well for 30 years. When it gave up the ghost I bought a new one immediately (although not a Craftsman).

And you absolutely do need a router. (Several in fact. I have three and am considering another). Use a router table if you are going to use large bits (a 1/2 inch shank, 45 degree chamfer bit is already a 2 inch diameter hunk of high speed, sharp steel).

Whatever you buy, learn to use it safely. Get yourself a pair of safety goggles. Plan your cuts carefully-and always obey your gut. If your gut feeling is that making a certain cut is dangerous, then don't make it. Find another way. And don't work with power tools (or even certain hand tools-like chisels) when you are too tired to be working. You will get sloppy and you will hurt yourself.

Your fingers will thank you.
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Old 24th October 2017, 07:31 PM   #17
paul burchell is offline paul burchell  Canada
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The one power tool that can still make me feel uneasy is the router. About 20 years ago i bumped my hand with a spinning flush trim bit. It was while building our second house and i was laminating a 12'length of kitchen top well after the 8hr workday.

My router table mostly collects dust, not because of my boobo Just because i rely on it less. I have about 4 the only ones i use much lately are my circle cutter and dovetail jig set up. I think if i started all over again next to buying a tablesaw and router would be a good quality block plane and sharpening set. Once you can sharpen a tool to sheer end grain at about 1000 of a inch and be ready for finish the thought on how to ork wood changes. Reducing my reliance on sandpaper has become a real bonus.

Ive been tossing around the the idea lately of building a pair of speakers in the more traditional style of veneer over ply . the idea is to find a real pretty board, saw the veneer and apply after carcass construction using hide glue. With good planing i can carefuly saw stock from the veneer plank first to use on sub_strait edges. That way the edges can be shaped and the thicker veneer can be plained.
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Last edited by paul burchell; 24th October 2017 at 07:34 PM.
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Old 25th October 2017, 02:29 PM   #18
ilardi is offline ilardi  United States
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If you are looking for a sharpening system I recommend the WorkSharp. It is probably not as good as the Tormek but it costs less than half and the chisels and planes that I have sharpened with it easily pass the "shave the hair on your fore arm" test. The WorkSharp sharpeners (I have three of them, including a Drill Doctor and their Knife Sharpener) are not particularly elegant or even robust in their construction, but they are well designed, efficient, and cost effective. I tried "scary sharp" and a series of sharpening stones and manual sharpening jigs-I hated them all and as a result avoided sharpening my tools until I discovered the WorkSharp sharpeners. (no affiliation with WorkSharp-just a satisfied customer).
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Old 25th October 2017, 04:05 PM   #19
paul burchell is offline paul burchell  Canada
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I use water stones mostly, they work great i use a block of flat granite and wet sandpaper to keep the stones true. A combination 1000/4000 will do most work but i also havw a 10000 polishing stone. I am interested and may try a diamond plate soon.
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Last edited by paul burchell; 25th October 2017 at 04:08 PM.
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