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Can an enclosure be too thick?
Can an enclosure be too thick?
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Old 16th February 2017, 10:50 PM   #1
Lutjanus is offline Lutjanus  Australia
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Default Can an enclosure be too thick?

I am looking to build some speaker enclosures with some 16mm MDF that I already have.

I am thinking of using multiple layers to create the front, rear and side panels.

Is there a point of diminishing returns when constructing enclosures, in regards to wall thickness?

Last edited by Lutjanus; 16th February 2017 at 11:00 PM.
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Old 16th February 2017, 11:17 PM   #2
HumbleDeer is offline HumbleDeer  Belgium
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If you want to be real picky, yes. Softer walls will have a higher dampening effect, while harder and stiffer walls will have a reverbing effect. Though, on small speakers, I don't think you'll notice anything. There's still something like Lining that you can use to make them dampened slightly more. There's also a point at which when your enclosure is hard enough it just doesn't make sense to add more layers because there's just no positive effect of it. There's a strong negative effect with too much wood called 'Empty Wallet Syndrome'.

For subwoofers, I believe it's even less of importance. All it needs to be is rigid and stiff so the bass doesn't resonate the box (Unless it's a tline and designed to do so.)
That's where bracing and corner-pieces come in to play.

Cheers,
Anna

Last edited by HumbleDeer; 16th February 2017 at 11:20 PM.
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Old 16th February 2017, 11:21 PM   #3
forr is offline forr  France
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Look at member Speaker Dave's posts.
http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/searc...15208687&pp=25
By the way, I am sorry that Speaker Dave has not written here since a long time.
His informations about loudspeakers are really first class.
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Old 17th February 2017, 12:04 AM   #4
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
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My understanding is transmission lines have to be rigid too?
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Old 17th February 2017, 12:40 AM   #5
Jonathan Bright is online now Jonathan Bright  Australia
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To answer your initial question: Yes, they can at times.
This topic is something of "a black art" and repays reading widely in the area of resonances but if you are looking at multiple layers then it would be a very good chance in investigate Constrained Layer Damping. That has a number of benefits. While in the general area of multiple/composit panels have you thought about sand filled walls? (Gilbert Briggs, early Wharfedale etc) But I suggest you read and look out for Damping (the "Q" factor) and become aware of some of the counter intuitive results people have found in listening tests at different frequencies.....e.g. how some very LOW "Q" panels, while theoretically favorable, are audibly inferior to a panel with higher "Q" on occasions. The BBC techniques, using thin panels, are also worth following up. The B&W Matrix design is a good model and if you have spare wood they are a challenge, audibly good and fun...

#4 scottjoplin; TRUE. (please give my regards to Newport) .

Cheers, Jonathan
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Last edited by Jonathan Bright; 17th February 2017 at 12:49 AM.
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Old 17th February 2017, 12:56 AM   #6
Ron E is offline Ron E  United States
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My opinion is that it is preferable to make panels stiff through bracing vs via thickness. Damping (constrained layer or otherwise) is more effective on thinner panels.

How thick is your speaker cone?
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Old 17th February 2017, 01:07 AM   #7
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
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Jonathan. Will do. And please say guday to Bundaberg for me
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Old 17th February 2017, 10:37 AM   #8
Lutjanus is offline Lutjanus  Australia
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Thanks for the replies everyone.
There is some great information in the posts above.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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Old 17th February 2017, 04:04 PM   #9
Jerms is offline Jerms  United Kingdom
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"Slipped disk syndrome" might be another problem. I built MLTLs out of 25mm MDF. I haven't weighed them but they feel somewhere in the 20kg range. (84x27x31.5cm). Then I added the drivers.

I've seen an article regarding panel thickness and bracing in subwoofers. No real chance of me finding it again but the author professed surprise that going to 1.5" MDF was measurably better than bracing a thinner panel.

Nope, I can't find it.

J.
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Old 17th February 2017, 08:15 PM   #10
Jonathan Bright is online now Jonathan Bright  Australia
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How's the finances Lutjanus? You up for building two (or more) and letting us know the results of a comparison test.
Btw if you chase up panels/box construction threads here at diyaudio it won't be long before you will find post that are quite critical of MDF for a couple of reasons.
(a) apparently there health issues with the dust and
(b) there seems to be a widespread consensus that MDF sounds inferior to other materials especially plywood. It is noticeable that there is agreement on this point that MDF "sucks the life out of the music" and comments along those lines.....
Good luck in the noble art of DIY speakers.
I am not sure if there are support groups for addicts but be warned.......it is addictive ha ha.
Cheers Jonathan
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