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Old 28th January 2014, 02:49 AM   #1
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Default first time veneer, CC, Iron, PSA?

I've read so many veneer threads my head is spinning. I need to veneer some speakers and I've never done it before.

I read one thread and iron on is simply the best and easiest, I read another thread and suddenly contact cement is the be all end all. One thread says veneer saws are by far the best way to cut the stuff and the next thread says don't use a veneer saw, use xx or yy. Then there's several best ways to put glue on, etc.

I've got a set of the Dayton D3s, so they are not all that big, no curves and simple openings, except the port that is flared a fair amount. I'm going with birch and just a clear finish, all sides. I'm thinking of getting the veneer from tapeease and using Titan DX, but I want something that's going to be easy for a first timer with very basic woodworking skills to get an acceptably good end result.

Please help...


Thanks!
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Old 28th January 2014, 03:45 AM   #2
guangui is offline guangui  Puerto Rico
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Cannot help you...Doing my first veneering job also. Was planning on going with the iron method. As yourself, I have read many articles on it, and all different. Look forward to what is recommended...Good Luck!
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Old 28th January 2014, 05:05 PM   #3
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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paper backed or raw veneer?

I've veneered more than a few pairs of speaker boxes over the years, and would strongly advise against any type of CC (solvent or latex based) or the PSA if you're planning on wrapping around more than one face of a finished box . Just as with plastic laminate there's no margin for error for alignment, and it's way too easy to get bubbles or wrinkles.

I personally use paper backed veneer (4x8 or 4x10ft sheet), the iron on method with regular yellow wood glue and a short pile velor paint roller. Paper backed veneer is very easy to work with - cut to rough sizes with scissors, and trim overhang with either sharp utility knife (box -cutter), 2" thick chisel or sanding block (150G) - special tooling not essential

The only downside with paper veneer is the very thin top layer of wood can too easily be sanded through

Raw veneers tend to be much thicker, and do require a bit more time and skill - practice first. Veneer saws aren't particularly expensive
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Old 28th January 2014, 07:06 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisb View Post
paper backed or raw veneer?

I've veneered more than a few pairs of speaker boxes over the years, and would strongly advise against any type of CC (solvent or latex based) or the PSA if you're planning on wrapping around more than one face of a finished box . Just as with plastic laminate there's no margin for error for alignment, and it's way too easy to get bubbles or wrinkles.

I personally use paper backed veneer (4x8 or 4x10ft sheet), the iron on method with regular yellow wood glue and a short pile velor paint roller. Paper backed veneer is very easy to work with - cut to rough sizes with scissors, and trim overhang with either sharp utility knife (box -cutter), 2" thick chisel or sanding block (150G) - special tooling not essential

The only downside with paper veneer is the very thin top layer of wood can too easily be sanded through

Raw veneers tend to be much thicker, and do require a bit more time and skill - practice first. Veneer saws aren't particularly expensive
Exactly what I wanted to know, THANK YOU.

I had no idea that you could iron on regular wood glue like that, none. I was looking at the paper backed and I'd get the 4x8 size so that I have extra to experiment with first.

One more question, do I need to go over the MDF with coarse sandpaper first?

Thanks again for the help.
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Old 28th January 2014, 07:25 PM   #5
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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Originally Posted by sbrunkow View Post
Exactly what I wanted to know, THANK YOU.

I had no idea that you could iron on regular wood glue like that, none. I was looking at the paper backed and I'd get the 4x8 size so that I have extra to experiment with first.

One more question, do I need to go over the MDF with coarse sandpaper first?

Thanks again for the help.


Well aside from risking a flame war by chiding your use of MDF instead of plywood, - yes, assuming you're veneering to more than a single face, you'd want to give all joints and surfaces a good sanding ( I use 80G on random orbit sander myself) to avoid telegraphing of uneven joints and glue seams through the relatively thin paper/veneer, and to allow some penetration through the MDF's often lightly tempered surface.
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Old 28th January 2014, 08:05 PM   #6
evanc is offline evanc  United States
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2 ply wwod on wood veneer is excellent. Available here, but made by formwood. Two-Ply Wood on Wood Veneer Stock List
you will get very little telegraphing.

I like unibond 800 for veneering. Vacuum Pressing Systems -- Veneer Glue
but yellow glue also works great.

If you are veneering all the way around the box I would cut veneer pieces slightly larger then each side using scissors. Put a piece of veneer face down on a flat work bench, spread your glue on the side of the box being worked on and lay it on the veneer. clamp the box down or just put a bunch of weight on it. Once the glue dries flush the veneer with the edges using a sharp knife and or a sanding block. Move on to another side and repeat until you have wrapped the whole box.

Hope this is helpfull,
Evan
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Old 28th January 2014, 09:00 PM   #7
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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The 2 ply and cold pressing (or even vacuum bagging) certainly works great, but I tend to rebate drivers and input terminal cups / plates as well as use narrow slot vents, and have found the paper back much easier for that application. I'll use the nose of iron to scorch the outline of edges and cutouts.

And of course a commercial millwork shop will always have a 5 gal bucket of Dural or Titebond yellow kicking around . It doesn't take long for each of us to find a process that works - if I'd actually had any formal trade schoolin, I might have learned the "correct" way .

The unibond does look interesting
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Old 28th January 2014, 10:11 PM   #8
evanc is offline evanc  United States
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Unibond is slow to dry and has no initial tack but fills gaps and dries rock hard.
I would usually veneer first and then cut out for drivers, but if the hole is already there you could just use a flush trim bit to cut the veneer to the opening after veneering over the hole.
And yes my methods are what work for me and are not the only right way.
Evan
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Old 28th January 2014, 11:30 PM   #9
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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evan - I've used the 2-ply before, and you're right it certainly doesn't telegraph like paper back, but it's the rebates for flush mounting that are shallower than the bearing clearance on a trim bit that have messed me up

and of course being a lazy bugger with access to a CNC machine, I get the driver and terminal holes routed before assembly whenever possible, and post veneer
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Old 28th January 2014, 11:46 PM   #10
evanc is offline evanc  United States
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Taking full advantage of nice tools isn't being lazy, it's being smart.
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