Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Construction Tips

Construction Tips Construction techniques and tips

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 7th September 2013, 11:19 PM   #31
diyAudio Member
 
shedlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
One of my favourite tools for sheet is the Wiss supershear (similar shown here). they're similar to snips or aviation shears but effectively have three blades so cut out a thin strip of material without distorting the sheet at all ...a bit like a hand powered nibbler (in fact I have an Hitchi CN16, but invariably pick up the Wiss for most jobs). They go through 1.2mm (18swg) steel with ease, and should do 1.5mm, or thicker if your cutting aluminium. They're also handy for irregular shapes ...notching corners for trays etc.

For just making straight (or longer curved) cuts you could consider a bench mounted throatless shear.The type that uses a wheel cutter (like this). You can pick up the basic versions for practically nothing.
  Reply With Quote
Old 7th September 2013, 11:55 PM   #32
AJT is offline AJT  Philippines
diyAudio Moderator
 
AJT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Palatiw, Pasig City
this is a nibbler that i use...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_3781.jpg (406.3 KB, 182 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_3783.jpg (412.5 KB, 180 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_3782.jpg (413.7 KB, 174 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th September 2013, 05:14 PM   #33
diyAudio Member
 
DEQ+TheEnd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Ok, so the guillotine exercise did not unveil anything new to me. It still warp the steel plate far too much for my liking. Even when only trimming the edge.

Ended up using the battery powered jigsaw. Freehand and very slow. Forget about laser guide as I had to angle the saw some 2-4 degree on the line to make it go somewhat strait.
Then I used the angle grinder with a grind disc to take the cut closer to the line before finishing with a hand file.

6 minute job with the right tool (hydraulic guillotine) to most of the Sunday to finish.

Click the image to open in full size.

Regarding battery operated jig saw. They have plenty of power for this kind of jobs. Just stay clear of the model in the picture from my first post. I’m on my second one, and even this one is on its way back to the dealer again. On my fist jigsaw the laser stopped working. This one drain the battery even when not in use. Blade guide has way to much play and finally, laser is not aligned correctly. And I’m very tempted to say this tool is designed by morons whom never used a jig saw. The shield meant to protect you from stray bits and dust are made from yellow translucent plastic. Very hard to look through so you end up removing the protection glass. ...but I didn't say that out load, did I?

Last edited by DEQ+TheEnd; 8th September 2013 at 05:22 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th October 2013, 10:02 AM   #34
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
For centuries, craftsmen used hand tools, because there was no electricity. They still made precision cuts in all kind of materials. Today, we take it for granted that we need a power tool to make even the most trivial cut.

For many years, I've been using a simple carbide tipped laminate cutter (see attachment) and a straight edge for cutting sheet metal and printed circuit boards. If you consider all the set up time required for power tools, I believe that using the laminate cutter is just as fast, and less prone screw-ups. (It certainly doesn't wander.)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg LaminateCutter.jpg (4.8 KB, 103 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th October 2013, 12:22 PM   #35
diyAudio Member
 
jazbo8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: In Transient
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Weaver View Post
For many years, I've been using a simple carbide tipped laminate cutter (see attachment) and a straight edge for cutting sheet metal and printed circuit boards. If you consider all the set up time required for power tools, I believe that using the laminate cutter is just as fast, and less prone screw-ups. (It certainly doesn't wander.)
How thick can the sheet metal be? Got to get one to try...
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th October 2013, 02:47 PM   #36
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Santa Rosa Beach, FL
Depending on how much cutting you need, and if you are only doing "straight cuts".....and your proximity to a metal/machinist/air conditioning shop.....it would be best to use a professional metal brake to shear your panels.

I have access to a shop that has a ten foot (about 3 meter) long metal shear, and I've used it to cut 1/4" thick aluminum panels, "like butter". Perfectly straight, clean cuts. Although the shear is HUGE, its extremely accurate (to 1/1000 of an inch).

The shop charges about $60/hour, but I've arranged to "run a tab" at the shop. It takes about two mnutes for the machinist to measure and cut the panel, so he's letting me do about 30 panels, as I need them, for my audio and automotive needs. That should last me for a few years, and at an effective rate of $2 a panel, it's a bargain. I would have spent more in hacksaw blades than that....!
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th October 2013, 04:19 PM   #37
diyAudio Member
 
DEQ+TheEnd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
You got a sweet deal there CanAm. Here SDIY projects pile up in hope that I in the (distant) future can save money on a bigger order. Rather pointless approach, I now. Having cases full of almost ready modules not playing music.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th October 2013, 06:13 PM   #38
diyAudio Member
 
AcoustatAnswerMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Chandler Arizona
[QUOTE=DEQ+TheEnd;3624384]Ok, so the guillotine exercise did not unveil anything new to me. It still warp the steel plate far too much for my liking. Even when only trimming the edge.

Look for a 'gauge adjustment' on your shear. This is meant to adjust the gap (or clearance) between blades for different thicknesses of material. If your shear is rolling over the edge when it cuts, the gap between blades is too large. If the material requires a lot of force to shear (and it's still within the capability of the shear), then the gap between blades is too small.

If the amount of edge-rolling is not the same across the length of the cut, then the blades are not parallel. Depending on the quality of the shear, your unit may or may not have adjustments for that.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th October 2013, 06:24 PM   #39
diyAudio Member
 
DEQ+TheEnd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Thanks! I'll check next time to if it has this option. Probably not as I bought the biggest they had in a store not particularly famous for its professional tools.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th October 2013, 09:21 PM   #40
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazbo8 View Post
How thick can the sheet metal be? Got to get one to try...
I have a 300mm wide bench brake/shear that I use most of the time, but if I have wider material, or material too thick for the shear to handle, then I use the laminate cutter. So, it will cut fairly thick sheet metal.

You need to make multiple light strokes with this thing, but it doesn't take much pressure, so it's not hard work. Within a couple of minutes, it will score the metal deep enough that you can flex the sheet and it will snap along the score line. It's best if you score both sides of the sheet. The cut edge can be cleaned up by running a file along it. I estimate that it's about as fast as using handheld tin snips, and you don't have the problem of the metal curling along the cut line.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cutting openings in metal panels akis Equipment & Tools 19 28th September 2013 08:37 AM
Sheet Metal Shear! dirkwright Equipment & Tools 10 26th January 2012 03:24 AM
Sheet metal cooling Skorpio Pass Labs 1 10th May 2008 12:49 PM
Sheet Metal Gauge kafka007 Tubes / Valves 10 15th November 2006 01:40 AM
cutting metal/plastic sheets ?? kambule Everything Else 0 30th June 2006 10:58 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 06:52 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2