How to get a high gloss black finish (near piano black) - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Construction Tips

Construction Tips Construction techniques and tips

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 5th July 2013, 02:46 PM   #11
WagBoss is offline WagBoss  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by WagBoss View Post
for sealing the mdf, I have read a lot that shellac is the best. Which one should I use? Shellacs | Interior Stains & Finishes | Paint | Décor | Home Depot Canada

Is there something better then shellac?
can anyone answer this please?

in regards to taking this to a boat builder, I'm not really interested in that, this is a DIY forum :P
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2013, 05:34 PM   #12
6speed is offline 6speed  United States
diyAudio Member
 
6speed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
I'm not a wood working expert. However, as I understand shellac is referred to as being either "shellac" or "dewaxed shellac". The "dewaxed shellac" is the version that is considered the universal sealer / everything sticks to it / it sticks to everything variety. I would read the label carefully to see if it is listed as being "dewaxed", if it does not say then I would assume it contains some wax and you might want to look for a different one since you plan to paint over it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2013, 09:05 PM   #13
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: victoria BC
Is there something "better than", or at least alternative to shellac for sealing MDF - yes, certainly if you're not worried about bleed through of stains, and planning on building several color / top coats - ranging from the consumer products available at the likes of Rona, Home Depot, Home Hardware, etc. to industrial products for the commercial cabinetry / woodworking trades, available through regional distributors.

When you mix the phrases "high gloss" and "piano black paint" in the same thread, I think of a finish with depth and durability. You'll probably want to look at the polyurethanes, tinted lacquers or varnishes, as opposed to acrylics, latex, or even marine grade alkyd enamels which are still available in some locations.

Exactly where in Canada are you located? That can affect access to the commercial grade products.

There's certainly no reason not to spray the sealer/primer, color and top coats, but you will want to invest in a decent gun, water trap/filter for a standard compressor based system, or a turbine powered HVLP system. Be prepared to spend a few hours of practice to get it right, particularly if wrapping around curved profile edges, at least a few coats to build depth, and lots of polishing / buffing of the final couple of coats. Altogether the painting can take much more time than the fabrication.
__________________
you don't really believe everything you think, do you?
community sites t-linespeakers.org, frugal-horn.com commercial site planet10-HiFi

Last edited by chrisb; 5th July 2013 at 09:08 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2013, 10:05 PM   #14
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bakersfield Ca
For sure my deepest looking finishes have been with lacquer, the interesting thing about it is the coats all melt into each other to become one layer. This posed a problem for me one time I let a speaker I was working on outside to dry and the sun hit part of it and it blistered. To fix it I had to sand all of it off. The finish is quite stunning, however care must be taken as it is never is completely cured and will react with things placed on it. Now some of the new water-based urethanes made today are pretty impressive, easy to work with , easy to clean, and produce a durable finish. The other thing about MDF for some reason my joint lines never completely go away, since I veneer about everything I build it has not been a problem but I am sure there is some trick.

Bill
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th July 2013, 09:06 AM   #15
Did it Himself
diyAudio Member
 
richie00boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Gloucestershire, England, UK
Ah the old joint showing problem. Difficult to eliminate completely, but can be very much minimised by keeping the wood in the house for a couple of weeks or more prior to glueing, the use of a rigid glue such as urea formaldehyde (definitely not PVA) and better quality MDF - deep router grade, or moisture resistant at a push.
__________________
www.readresearch.co.uk my website for UK diy audio people - designs, PCBs, kits and more.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th July 2013, 05:10 PM   #16
WagBoss is offline WagBoss  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Ok based on what I have access to basically my only option was high gloss black enamel or high gloss black lacquer. I went with the lacquer. Rust-Oleum Specialty | Lacquer - Gloss Black | Home Depot Canada

What should I seal the MDF with? The guys at home depot had no idea... lol. Should I just use an oil based primer, or should I use this? Zinsser | Shellac -Clear -473Ml | Home Depot Canada

It does not say if it is dewaxed or not. Since it doesn't say dewaxed does this mean it has some wax?

Any suggestions on what grits of sandpaper to get to do each coat?

Last edited by WagBoss; 8th July 2013 at 05:14 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th July 2013, 05:11 PM   #17
WagBoss is offline WagBoss  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by wirewiggler View Post
For sure my deepest looking finishes have been with lacquer, the interesting thing about it is the coats all melt into each other to become one layer. This posed a problem for me one time I let a speaker I was working on outside to dry and the sun hit part of it and it blistered. To fix it I had to sand all of it off. The finish is quite stunning, however care must be taken as it is never is completely cured and will react with things placed on it. Now some of the new water-based urethanes made today are pretty impressive, easy to work with , easy to clean, and produce a durable finish. The other thing about MDF for some reason my joint lines never completely go away, since I veneer about everything I build it has not been a problem but I am sure there is some trick.

Bill
What did you put under the black lacquer? Any sealer or primer? Did you put a top coat of a clear high gloss, or did you just sand the lacquer and it gave you the high gloss finish that you wanted?
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2013, 12:56 PM   #18
WagBoss is offline WagBoss  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Ok I have found this zinsser bin primer sealer Zinsser | Zinnser Bin Primer -946Ml | Home Depot Canada

Would this work good to seal the mdf before I put on the black lacquer? Is it ok to paint this on with a brush?

I could also use the same stuff but in a spray can, it's a bit more money http://www.homedepot.ca/product/369g...r-spray/978744
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2013, 01:44 PM   #19
6speed is offline 6speed  United States
diyAudio Member
 
6speed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by WagBoss View Post
Ok I have found this zinsser bin primer sealer Zinsser | Zinnser Bin Primer -946Ml | Home Depot Canada

Would this work good to seal the mdf before I put on the black lacquer? Is it ok to paint this on with a brush?

I could also use the same stuff but in a spray can, it's a bit more money Zinsser | 369g BIN Primer Sealer Spray | Home Depot Canada
IMHO, I would say that's what you want. Shellac goes on smooth with a good fine brush. Be sure to grab some denatured alcohol to clean your brush and thin the shellac to a workable consistency that you like if needed, it is usually pretty heavy in the can.

One thing I learned working with shellac in the past is it dries really fast as compared to poly, it comes back to life with denatured alcohol or with more shellac but I found I needed to work with small batches and not "mess around".
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2013, 05:24 PM   #20
Did it Himself
diyAudio Member
 
richie00boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Gloucestershire, England, UK
I think you were right to go for lacquer rather than enamel. You would have struggled flatting and polishing the enamel.

Zinsser BIN is a good primer/sealer if a touch expensive. Well it is over here anyway. Without a spraygun setup I would say brush or roller it as you will go through spray cans too fast and this will cost too much.

Take your time and you should have a good result.
__________________
www.readresearch.co.uk my website for UK diy audio people - designs, PCBs, kits and more.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
piano black or other high gloss finishes on MDF mondogenerator Construction Tips 20 31st May 2014 03:04 AM
Ideas For Getting Piano Black Finish 2MuchRiceMakesMeSick Construction Tips 8 7th February 2012 09:27 AM
FS: Dayton Speaker Cabinets - Gloss Piano Black uzernaam Swap Meet 2 7th December 2010 11:20 PM
Applying piano black finish help Toast_Master Subwoofers 15 28th May 2006 06:48 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 03:14 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2