Soldering tips!?!? ..wetting problems - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Construction Tips

Construction Tips Construction techniques and tips

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 24th February 2013, 04:06 PM   #11
Einric is offline Einric  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Einric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Bozeman, MT
I have used Cardas Quad Eutectic on my past 6 projects and I will never go back to anything else.

That being said, get some denatured alcohol and a HARD bristle toothbrush.
Scrub all the surfaces you want to solder very well.

With your silver bearing lead free solder I would use 700-750F tip temperature, especially for power traces.
If you still can't quite get the solder to flow cleanly then you may need a higher wattage iron.

I use a Weller WES51 at work and I find it is barely sufficient for large power traces.
I have a buddy that uses a Haako FX-888 and I find it a little better for heavy work than my Weller.
The new FX-888D is probably a little better due to its new temperature control system.
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th February 2013, 04:19 PM   #12
diyAudio Member
 
KatieandDad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: UK
The temperature isn't always the problem. On a large joint, if the iron is too small the joint will cool down the iron rather than the iron heat up the joint.

Sometimes. you need the brawn of a bigger iron. 25W is what I generally use for larger joints especially around the PSU area.
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th February 2013, 04:23 PM   #13
expert in tautology
diyAudio Member
 
bear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: New York State USA
Radio Shack sells a small spool of 2% silver (tin/lead) eutectic solder. I know who the mfr is, and it is pretty good solder, wets well. Pretty easy to find.

Look out for random "flux" some flux is corrosive, and intended for plumbing joints. Not good for most electronic applications.

Lead free just doesn't work well, that I have seen thus far...
...no need for hobbyists in North America to use it. Dunno about the rest of the world.

_-_-bear
__________________
_-_-bear
http://www.bearlabs.com -- Btw, I don't actually know anything, FYI -- [...2SJ74 Toshiba bogus asian parts - beware! ]
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th February 2013, 07:23 PM   #14
AntonTR is offline AntonTR  Russian Federation
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Moscow
Hello!

I had the same problems until I changed an iron to a bigger one (18W was not enough).
I tried Stannol soldering wire and found it very nice but experienced that LF wire is not so easy for novice.
Being not an expert, I would rather agree that lead free is too much for hobby...
Also notice that flux is the key for good joint.

Lately I found a nice tutorial - please look at this:
EEVblog #180 - Soldering Tutorial Part 1 - Tools
EEVblog #183 - Soldering Tutorial Part 2
EEVblog #186 - Soldering Tutorial Part 3 - Surface Mount

Best regards, Anton
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th February 2013, 07:44 PM   #15
tvrgeek is offline tvrgeek  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Md
The tip can be a big difference, not just the temp. I use an old Weller production iron. 60W with 600, 700 or 800 tips, but they go from a tiny needle to a big wedge. The big wedge works when you need big cable onto big tabs or planes, where the tiny tip is for IC's. It's the mass of the tip. Second is flux. Don;t depend on the weak flux in the solder core when doing a buss or plane joint. Get a tin of activated flux and past it on. Even though it is "activated", you should still clean it off. If the 60W wedge won't do it, the out comes my 600W Weller gun.

I have several pounds of good old Kester 40/60 stashed.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th February 2013, 11:49 AM   #16
diyAudio Member
 
regiregi22's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Madrid (Spain)
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieandDad View Post
The temperature isn't always the problem. On a large joint, if the iron is too small the joint will cool down the iron rather than the iron heat up the joint.

Sometimes. you need the brawn of a bigger iron. 25W is what I generally use for larger joints especially around the PSU area.
A temperature controlled iron pretty much solves this problem. They regulate power to achieve an stable temp, so if it feels it decreasing, it just heat it more.
I use this one, which provides up to 80W when needed. So it heats up very fast, you can solder in less than 8 seconds since switched on.

http://www.weller.de/products/product.php?pid=1202
__________________
diyAudio, doing it as big as you can, JUST BECAUSE WE CAN!
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th February 2013, 04:30 PM   #17
AuroraB is offline AuroraB  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
AuroraB's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Norway, -north of the moral circle..
I can only second that 80W Weller! I've had mine at work for over 10 years now, and I won't cahnge it for anything! That said, the Metcals have a different way of supplying heat to the joint, and actually works better for larger ground planes. 25W is way to low for g.planes, in my opinion.
- and BTW - lead-free also requires special purpose fluxes..........
( and I hate both of them ! I have enough regular solder to last my time... )
__________________
While the Lie leapt from Bagdad to Constantinopel, the Truth was still looking for it's sandals!
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th February 2013, 09:58 PM   #18
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: The home of Porsche, Daimler, Bosch etc
Although the Wellers are really good, the JBC Stations are much better! I won't go back!

Mike
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th February 2013, 08:03 AM   #19
diyAudio Member
 
regiregi22's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Madrid (Spain)
In what sense? Now expose your reasons
__________________
diyAudio, doing it as big as you can, JUST BECAUSE WE CAN!
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th February 2013, 03:41 PM   #20
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: The home of Porsche, Daimler, Bosch etc
The heat regulation works even better (faster). Large Pads, RCA sockets or even Heatsinks can be soldered easily withot getting very hot, because the heat is put in fast enough to make the solder joint immediately. 3-4 seconds after Poweron you can solder. Therefore the iron can even be put in standby in the holder without much waiting when you want to continue.

The way the tips are changed is superbly simple.

And (although thats quite a matter oft taste probably) I much more like the handling and weight of the iron.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Throw those bad soldering tips away ! nigelwright7557 Class D 29 23rd November 2011 09:00 PM
Soldering Tips Monjul Multi-Way 9 4th July 2010 07:43 PM
Soldering tips for soldering station BEST PRICE, FREE SHIPPING, 15% discount vtech9815 Vendor's Bazaar 0 27th January 2010 04:40 PM
Need help deciding on soldering station/tips Slick1 Equipment & Tools 5 21st December 2009 09:14 PM
Soldering Tips patherb Multi-Way 27 14th February 2009 11:21 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:12 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2