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Old 28th September 2012, 06:08 PM   #11
Einric is offline Einric  United States
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Also the cheap snap off razors are nice you can always have a sharp edge and you can run them far out and have a flexible blade to cut flush with.
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Old 30th September 2012, 03:11 AM   #12
FozzZ is offline FozzZ  Canada
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Are you adding the veneer after you make the cabinets or is the veneer glued to the core already?

If you are cutting the veneer after it has already been glued to your core, a s oring blade is the ideal solution. But chances are you do not have a saw with this option. You can get triple chip blades for your saw that will minimize the problems your having.
If buying a high new saw blade is out of your budget, I would suggest applying masking tape to the area you intend to cut and then place a spoil board on top of the veneered board. This should stop the veneer from chipping.

And while not considered a safe option, you cn raise your saw blade so that it is cutting on a more downward angle. This will also reduce chips.

FYI, make sure your finished side is facing up and you table saw fence is perfectly parallel with your blade.

If you are adding the veneer after the cabinet has been built, simply clamp a spoil board to the cabinet to act as reinforcement while you cut the veneer. You will not get any chipping if you do this.
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Old 30th September 2012, 07:29 AM   #13
AR2 is offline AR2  United States
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I would strongly recommend a paper back veneer. It is much easier for handling, and all that you need is blade and light sanding for edges. I used neoprene glue, applied to both surfaces - twice. I always leave extra veneer to be cut later, particularly because this glue holds immediately. Also I use kitchen rolling pin to apply evenly and to avoid air pockets. After veneer is applied I cut extra veneer with blade.
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Old 30th September 2012, 12:16 PM   #14
FozzZ is offline FozzZ  Canada
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Paper back veneer is nice and it is easier to work with. It is also less prone to bleed through (glue seeping through the grain).

But it is also more expensive and your options are more limited regarding species and grain/figure.
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Old 1st October 2012, 01:01 AM   #15
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FozzZ, you're right about the masking tape if cutting veneered panels prior to assembly. My only addition would be to use the green or blue masking tape, and make sure you press it firmly into place.
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Old 2nd October 2012, 10:01 PM   #16
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FozzZ View Post
Paper back veneer is nice and it is easier to work with. It is also less prone to bleed through (glue seeping through the grain).

But it is also more expensive and your options are more limited regarding species and grain/figure.

Well, not necessarily more expensive per square foot compared to raw leaf veneers, although of course many smaller speakers don't need a full 4x8 or 4x10ft sheet, and depending on the supplier ( Flexwood, Veneer Supplies.com, Veneer Tech, Brookline, Jacaranda/Sanply) , the available species can be pretty extensive - I've yet to get stumped on a species request, but sometimes the client will suffer from a bit of sticker shock.

As for applying veneer, I prefer to post veneer completed cabinets using the iron-on glue method ( Titebond II or equivalent) - since the heat is applied after the glue has tack-dried (10-15 min on average), it gives much more working time for precise alignment / grain matching. No more than 1/4" overhang is required - a sharp 2" bench chisel works very well for trimming cross grain, and hard sanding block with 150G tidies things up nicely at edges. For trimming out recessed driver / terminal cutouts or vent slots, use the nose of the iron to lightly scorch a line, then proceed carefully with the chisel/utility knife. For sanding edges of slots too narrow for a wood block, I wrap a piece of PSA sandpaper around a Nicholson 8" handyfile.


and FozzZ, et al - note that the scoring blade will only prevent chipping on the bottom side of cut panels - really only a big problem on cross grain cuts on veneer - far more so on melamines & 2 sided HP laminate layups , and that the super duper special chip free blades don't always
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Last edited by chrisb; 2nd October 2012 at 10:13 PM. Reason: typoze
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Old 3rd October 2012, 01:52 AM   #17
FozzZ is offline FozzZ  Canada
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We're getting a little off topic, but I use Brookline products regularly. They have a man made veneer product called Braewood. It's nice to work with and offers very consistent grain patterns from sheet to sheet. It isn't cheap, but if you are doing production work, it helps.
For anyone interested, you can have any species applied to the core of your choice buy companies like Upper Canada. Again, be prepared to pay if you don't have much volume.
A scoring blade will prevent chipping on the bottom side of your sheet goods, a good blade will prevent them on top. And laminate is definitely more prone to chipping.
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Old 3rd October 2012, 05:00 AM   #18
toobhed is offline toobhed  United States
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Thanks for the continued tips and keeping the info coming! My three attempts all utilized paper back veneer...I've never tried any other. I've also always completed the cabinets before veneering and will try the blue masking tape to help avoid small tear-outs. I've ordered a veneer saw with pre sharpened replacement blades which I'll use in place of an exact knife.....and I'll report back. thanks,
Mario
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Old 3rd October 2012, 05:02 PM   #19
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FozzZ View Post
We're getting a little off topic,
too easy for multi-discipline geeks - and like much else in life, regardless of level of experience & training it'll be rare to find consensus

Quote:

but I use Brookline products regularly. They have a man made veneer product called Braewood. It's nice to work with and offers very consistent grain patterns from sheet to sheet. It isn't cheap, but if you are doing production work, it helps.
For anyone interested, you can have any species applied to the core of your choice buy companies like Upper Canada. Again, be prepared to pay if you don't have much volume.
yup - there are several makers of the reconstituted / composite veneers.
The harvesting and manufacturing processes are very time consuming (one can't help but wonder about the net "carbon/environmental footprint) - resulting in higher costs than many of the standard naturals - but of course it allows for reasonable simulation of endangered exotics, as well as a wider range of patterns and colors than you ever want to let an interior designer know about .

Brookside's Macassar Ebony is a particularly nice pattern - the "quarter / rift cut" oaks, cherry and walnuts I personally find rather boring - nowhere near the life / soul of the real thing, but I digress
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Old 4th October 2012, 07:11 AM   #20
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ive found using a knife to cut back under an inch, then a trimmer, run in every inch or so then you can run the trimmer along the edge. but a trimmer with the right router bit will fly thru it
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