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Old 3rd July 2012, 07:31 PM   #11
DrDyna is offline DrDyna  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcx View Post
anyone with experience with Green Glue NOISEPROOF YOUR LIFE | Green Glue

makes a constrained layer dampming system by guing a 2nd sheet over the 1st layer of drywall, the gule is claimed to be viscoelastic

could reduce resonance amplitude
Awesome, I haven't seen that stuff yet, I might have to invest.
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Old 3rd July 2012, 07:31 PM   #12
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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Well for one thing, the standard residential construction code probably doesn't take the vibrations from (multiple) sub(s) into consideration, and as anyone who's attended a THX cinema recently can attest, attempting even close to the SPL reference level of over 100dB in an average domestic environment is asking rather a lot of its structural integrity.

As others have already noted, while it makes installation of the drywall more time consuming and messy, using a subfloor adhesive to wall studs, in addition to doubling up on the number of screws doesn't hurt - also make sure they're the longer coarse threaded type.

Too late now, unless you want to strip all the old board, but when I built a small basement bedroom for a teenage son a few years ago, sound isolation was on my mind. While many jurisdictions interior none load bearing walls are permitted on 24" centers, I went for 16" OC, and added a layer of 1/2" DonnaConna fiber under the 1/2" drywall, and lotsa screws.

Sound control walls will often use resilient channel and multiple layers of materials with gaps and flexible acoustic sealants. See particularly the note below about not penetrating the drywall screws into the studs in this type of floating mass loaded wall.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 3rd July 2012, 07:35 PM   #13
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The same can happen if you over-tighten the dry-wall screws and break the gypsom up within the dry-wall. Or even if you are using the wrong type of screws.
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Old 3rd July 2012, 07:38 PM   #14
DrDyna is offline DrDyna  United States
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Originally Posted by chrisb View Post

Too late now, unless you want to strip all the old board[/IMG]
It's not too big a deal, really, I'd rather tear up $200 worth of drywall and put it back up properly instead of fighting with it for the next 10 years, LOL.

So, in this method, you're really floating a decoupled wall on top of another? Another interesting idea that I had not considered.
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Old 3rd July 2012, 08:49 PM   #15
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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Originally Posted by DrDyna View Post
It's not too big a deal, really, I'd rather tear up $200 worth of drywall and put it back up properly instead of fighting with it for the next 10 years, LOL.

So, in this method, you're really floating a decoupled wall on top of another? Another interesting idea that I had not considered.

In the case of the construction method shown in photo, yes, the full mass of the multi-layer wall is essentially decoupled from the structural support studs via the resilient channel, floor pads, and extensive flexible acoustic caulking at all perimeter joints. Let's presume the same would apply to ceiling, and if you really wanted to get carried away, the floor would also be isolated.

Altogether, very time and materials intensive, and to be honest I've never actually needed to execute it myself - "but I was reading on the internet about it... "
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Old 3rd July 2012, 08:51 PM   #16
DrDyna is offline DrDyna  United States
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... to be honest I've never actually needed to execute it myself - "but I was reading on the internet about it... "
Right, I think I'm kinda in the same boat. Really, I'd just like to have walls that can stand up to a few hundred watts of thumpety thump :P

The ones I've built so far seem to be a little feeble.
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Old 3rd July 2012, 09:19 PM   #17
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Whatever you do don't add anything on top of what's there if what's already up is failing. As well as gluing the drywall up I have had good results fastening 1/2" plywood to the studs and then screwing/gluing drywall over the plywood. I usually do this to help flatten a wall or ceiling that has some wonky studs. The plywood is cheap and really sturdies up the assembly.
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Old 3rd July 2012, 09:24 PM   #18
DrDyna is offline DrDyna  United States
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Originally Posted by evanc View Post
Whatever you do don't add anything on top of what's there if what's already up is failing. As well as gluing the drywall up I have had good results fastening 1/2" plywood to the studs and then screwing/gluing drywall over the plywood. I usually do this to help flatten a wall or ceiling that has some wonky studs. The plywood is cheap and really sturdies up the assembly.
Evan

That...sounds like a fantastic idea. Perhaps the ply with some of the green glue between could be a tough customer.

Side note, I took a look at your website, you've got some beautiful furniture there, I perticulatly like your 10 drawer cabinet, I've wanted to make something like that for years for all my parts
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Old 3rd July 2012, 09:27 PM   #19
ODougbo is offline ODougbo  United States
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Use 5/8" G.W.B. and double screw every foot.

The standard gauge channel is pretty wimpy - move up to 20 gauge channel-studs-track.

btw, even 20gauge is not what it used to be, less metal (nope not the thickness) I've been buying 18 and 16 gauge for my projects.
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Old 3rd July 2012, 09:32 PM   #20
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You lot in the US have access to different products than we do in the UK. I built a stud wall between my Utlity Room and Lounge (one side being shaken by a Washing Machine)(the other by a pair of monstrous 200W speakers). All I did was double layer 8mm Gyproc with 100mm of Rockwool. ie 8mm+8mm+100mm+8mm+8mm. It's almost soundproof and it certainly doesnt shake loose. NO GLUE just lots of gyprock screws.
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