Suggestions Needed for New DIY'er - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Construction Tips

Construction Tips Construction techniques and tips

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 26th May 2012, 02:00 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Default Suggestions Needed for New DIY'er

Hi guys. I hope this post isn't misplaced, I apologize if it is. I'll try to be brief.

My background is one year in a tech lab in middle school. I learned how to do basic soldering and built a circuitboard with a couple LEDs and a switch.

My educational background is one year in calculus-based physics at the collegiate level, and about a third of that dealt with circuits. So, I understand basic circuitry principles very well.

I got curious about electronics repair and decided to dive in. I opened up the simplest handheld FM radio I could find and was overwhelmed to find that the complexity of the circuits far exceeded the hardest problems on our tests in college. This was definitely the stuff of EEs. So much for my original plan of troubleshooting and repairing my 39lb. Yamaha RX-V2600.

So my question is this: How do I get into this? Of course I would like to do some simple projects to get my hands wet, but how do I learn about this hobby? I would like to find some educational material on how you troubleshoot something with a multimeter, a sort of Dummies' Electronics Repair 101 guide.

Thanks for any help you guys can offer, and sorry this wasn't so brief.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th May 2012, 03:29 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
First of all ....

FM is an art unto itself. The "simplest handheld FM radio" is in another whole level of difficulty.

The most complex circuits are all composed of simple circuits, just gotta break it down.

Your Yamaha surround receiver is just a bunch of relatively straight forward components. Besides, the problem is probably just a bad super-cap.

I'd suggest starting with analog, audio frequency stuff and expanding from there. You'll start seeing things as you get familiar. Google up repair faq . org for a good introduction.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th May 2012, 09:15 PM   #3
dangus is offline dangus  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Vancouver Island
Read books and magazines. Explore the back issues of the library. Leech more current electronic magazines from file-sharing sites if that's legal on your planet; you can find about 20 years of Elektor on CDROM issues without much trouble. Audioxpress has some issues on line for free. Everyday Practical Electronics (EPE) back issues can be found.

Start with something easy like buying an amp module from somewhere and building it into a box. Build a kit.
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th May 2012, 11:48 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
boywonder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: So.Cal.
Default Your background is more than enough to jump right in.

I've built at least 5 amp projects and I doubt that I would be successful at troubleshooting my Yamaha power amp.....

Buy a kit, or build one of Nelson Pass's F5's (if you need a nice 50W amp). You can buy circuit boards for a number of Pass labs amps at the store here on DIYaudio. These are quite straightforward to build (although the F5 thread has over 11,000 posts!) The parts are readily avaialble from Digi-Key, Mouser, etc. You can get matched output transistors from sellers here on the swap meet forum.

Home Page

The Pass labs/Firstwatt stuff need big heatsinks; that's your biggest expense. You will learn lots, and basically need a soldering iron and a multimeter. Lot's of support on the forum here for those projects.

Modern mid-fi stuff like Yamaha, etc have lots of IC's in them; the DIY stuff here is mostly all discreet analog, through-hole stuff, ie much simpler. Nelson's First Watt circuits are very simple.

If you are into tubes, buy a kit or build a simple SE or PP amp from a well supported circuit here. You will be amazed at what 12W of tube power can do. TubeLab (Tubelab Home) sells some very nice circuit boards for about $35 for SE and PP designs that are highly regarded here if point to point wiring is too much for a first project. You can build any of the above on a piece of plywood.

There are plenty of other simple build options as well. What are your listening habits and how sensitive are your speakers?

Both Nelson Pass (Pass labs) and Tubelab have their own forums here with lots of support, and Nelson has lots of circuit descriptions on his firstwatt site and the DIY section of the Pass Labs site; both are very educational.

http://www.firstwatt.com/f5.html

Last edited by boywonder; 30th May 2012 at 11:55 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st May 2012, 12:42 AM   #5
Jay is offline Jay  Indonesia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Jakarta
Also learn to use simulator. When I have doubt about how a specific circuit work, LTSpice tells me precisely how it works.
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st May 2012, 01:31 AM   #6
49 - for the 18th time
diyAudio Member
 
c2cthomas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Near "Music City" (Nashville Tennessee)
Hello ashiyatl - and Welcome to diyAudio!!!

The good news is that there are many sites on the 'Net that will help you to learn electronic theory. Just like in collage you will need a bit of lab time to put theory into practice.

Start simple - and I would suggest with projects that involve the use of lower voltages. Tube circuits use very high voltages and are quite dangerous and some high power solid state amplifiers also use some pretty healthy voltages as well - sooooooo the 1st thing to learn is SAFETY!!!!

I would suggest that you take a look at building up some power supply circuits and some of the lower powered "T" amps for use as a headphone amplifier. It's a low cost way of getting into the hobby and results can be seen quickly.

Always feel free to ask around about things and someone will pop up with suggestions.

Here are a couple of sites to get you going - there are a lot more!!!
How to Solder
TALKING ELECTRONICS Soldering
Basic Car Audio Electronics
__________________
DIY audio can be expensive but getting to see things go up in smoke - that's priceless!!!! ..... "whatever - call it brainfart of Mighty ZM"
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st May 2012, 01:54 AM   #7
wlowes is offline wlowes  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
wlowes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Toronto
Blog Entries: 9
Default Check out Peter Daniel kits

Since you mentioned that you want to debug your amp, I assume that a new amp might be of interest.

I had even less experience and jumped in with a Peter Daniel chip amp kit. It was wonderfully full filling to build something more or less from scratch and then hear something better than my $2k retail system. Dead easy but also a little challenging when its your first. Peter's stuff is simple, but if you read his guides you will learn how simplicity is elegant and important. He has a very good DAC and will happily sell you equally good PCB for Nelson Pass amps. I think he is a great place to start.

That led me to need a linestage and I built a lightspeed attenuator. Search for GeorgeHiFi.
Wow, even better.

Later I discovered the Lampizator site and next thing I was building state of the art DAC with tube output and Async USB2 all with tons of low noise power supplies with discrete regulators. This led to exploring PC audio source which was a whole new labour of love. My audio source is now a client server set up with a small industrial processor running linux for the music player deamon fed by a separate NAS or data server and a remote client to control it from my easy chair. It all contributes to amazing sound quality. None of this would have been possible if I had not just jumped in with the chip amp. It kind of astounds my how much I have learned and how rewarding it has been.

While I am now slowly building my first OTL 6C33C tube amps to replace the chip amp, I must say I am still 5 years later listening to that Peter Daniel chip amp as I write this and still loving the sound.

So for me it has been a slow progression all based on stuff I learned on this site. I am astounded at the great sound system I now have with minimal $ invested. One thing I have come to learn is doing is far more rewarding than talking about it. Pick a simple project based on a good PCB kit and jump right in. The other thing I have learned is it does not need to look pretty to be very satisfying.

Have fun. You'll get lots of support on this site
  Reply With Quote
Old 4th June 2012, 06:01 AM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Dona paula, Goa
sound.westhost.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 4th June 2012, 06:24 AM   #9
oiphy is offline oiphy  Norway
diy newbie
diyAudio Member
 
oiphy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: norway
Basic Car Audio Electronics
exelent site for newb.

stig
__________________
" If you're going throu hell, keep going"
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th June 2012, 03:30 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashiyatl View Post
Hi guys. I hope this post isn't misplaced, I apologize if it is. I'll try to be brief.

My background is one year in a tech lab in middle school. I learned how to do basic soldering and built a circuitboard with a couple LEDs and a switch.

My educational background is one year in calculus-based physics at the collegiate level, and about a third of that dealt with circuits. So, I understand basic circuitry principles very well.

I got curious about electronics repair and decided to dive in. I opened up the simplest handheld FM radio I could find and was overwhelmed to find that the complexity of the circuits far exceeded the hardest problems on our tests in college. This was definitely the stuff of EEs. So much for my original plan of troubleshooting and repairing my 39lb. Yamaha RX-V2600.

So my question is this: How do I get into this? Of course I would like to do some simple projects to get my hands wet, but how do I learn about this hobby? I would like to find some educational material on how you troubleshoot something with a multimeter, a sort of Dummies' Electronics Repair 101 guide.

Thanks for any help you guys can offer, and sorry this wasn't so brief.
This might help

YAMAHA DSP-AX2600 RX-V2600 Service Manual free download, schematics, eeprom, repair info for electronics
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Preamp Kit - New DIY'er shanewayne Analog Line Level 35 27th February 2012 07:12 PM
Ich bin ein diy'er thom0911 Introductions 15 23rd September 2011 08:45 PM
your suggestions needed saltyreefguy Car Audio 4 24th June 2006 06:23 PM
And now... for the REALLY brave diy'er.. peace brainerd Everything Else 4 5th March 2006 10:12 PM
new Audio Diy'er from Holland comploeter Introductions 1 27th July 2005 08:32 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 10:07 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2