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Old 21st August 2011, 07:11 AM   #1
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Default solder pad rivet?

Hi, when we use thru hole components and want to solder the component on the other side of the board to which it is mounted, how is the solder pad connected to the components on the top? Is there some sort of rivet you use?
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[cap]
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board--------- ??????
solder
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Old 21st August 2011, 08:03 AM   #2
godfrey is offline godfrey  South Africa
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You just drill holes in the PCB. The component sits on one side of the board, the leads go through the holes and get soldered to the copper on the other side.

...or maybe I misunderstood the question. Surely you've seen this? If not, just have a look inside an amplifier or portable radio or something to see how it's done.
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Old 21st August 2011, 08:27 AM   #3
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You can specify "thru hole plating" when you buy a batch of boards. There are also hobbyist products that achieve the same result. You might hear them called "vias" although that word is also used for a similar connection between layers of a multi-layer PCB (no component in the hole, though). For diy stuff it's rarely needed. Just solder both sides. The component lead completes the circuit through the board.
In the past manufacturers did actually use a rivet-type pin.
If you are speaking of a single-sided board, vias aren't necessary, and the question should be rephrased as, "how is the component connected to the solder pad on the bottom?"
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Old 10th September 2011, 05:04 AM   #4
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For retrofit/ repair you might try these...


Eyelets - Circuit Board Repair and Rework Products

though mighty pricey at $0.50 each 100 minimum. Don't remember paying near that much to replenish a PC repair kit, but that was about 15 yrs ago.

Doc
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Old 10th September 2011, 05:50 AM   #5
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This ones much better;
T123/500 Vector Prototyping Products
Doc
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Old 10th September 2011, 09:20 AM   #6
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thanks for the details, i thought you must be able to buy something than just chance that the solder manages to reach the copper track on the other side of the board.
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Old 10th September 2011, 09:23 AM   #7
poynton is offline poynton  United Kingdom
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PACE Repair Skills Development Kit PCB Circuitry | eBay

A bit basic ( and pricey ) but should last for some time !!


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Old 10th September 2011, 09:28 AM   #8
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I had to do this recently to fix a damaged double sided PCB at work. It was a rush job, so I just popped down the local model shop, and found some 1.2mm diameter brass tube. Cut a short length by rolling it on the bench whilst pressing down on it with a knife blade, opened out the hole in the PCB to fit, then soldered in place. Perfect.
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Old 16th March 2012, 08:33 AM   #9
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You can cheaply and easily make copper rivets for vias and place them.

I wrote an article about this on PaulWanamaker.Wordpress.Com
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