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-   -   The lowdown on wood glues (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/construction-tips/194008-lowdown-wood-glues.html)

Cal Weldon 4th August 2011 02:50 PM

The lowdown on wood glues
 
Good link. Testing methods seem fair.

http://www.titebond.com/Download/pdf...urGlue_FWW.pdf

Thetwinmeister 19th January 2014 08:47 PM

Link is 404 now. Is this the same document?

http://www.oldbrownglue.com/pdf/HowS...urGlue_FWW.pdf

tvrgeek 26th January 2014 06:09 PM

My tests are still sitting in the shop sinking in. Only the epoxy covered with poly resin seems to have held up. (West 407) and is not showing the seam. I have my budget SilverFlute project with poly resin as glue under poly and will see how that holds up. In only two months, no shadow line yet.

Good test. I can add, super glue is terrible. So was the new wonder-glue anythings glues as they just soaked in instead of gluing. The problem for speaker builders is the long term shrinkage of the glue revealing a dip in the finish at the joint line. Yellow glue is especially bad.

Thetwinmeister 26th January 2014 09:00 PM

Interesting, did you document your tests anywhere? I would like to know more.

Specifically, I am interested yes, in strength, but largely in the ability to create an air-tight seal. A website suggested Fulaprene 303. Has anyone heard of or used this glue?

Top Shelf 4th February 2014 12:10 AM

You are correct, yellow glue sicks donkey ba**s. Months later and the seam shows up
Arrrgh

evanc 4th February 2014 12:58 AM

The wood/mdf is swelling and shrinking allowing the seam to show...it's not just the glues fault.
Try unibond 800.
Vacuum Pressing Systems -- Veneer Glue
It dries hard as a rock and is thin so it will soak into the grain and lock it up a bit.
Evan

wintermute 4th February 2014 01:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thetwinmeister (Post 3794124)
Interesting, did you document your tests anywhere? I would like to know more.

Specifically, I am interested yes, in strength, but largely in the ability to create an air-tight seal. A website suggested Fulaprene 303. Has anyone heard of or used this glue?

I used it (not 100% sure it was 303) for gluing the ports into my BR enclosures years ago. It is good for gap filling (my holes were slightly too big for the port). I don't think I would try to use it for joining MDF panels though. It is quite thick and may not squeze out of the joint like a PVA would, but we are talking 10years+ ago that I used it so memory may not so good. I think from memory it also does not dry rock hard (remains somewhat flexible) so I suspect it would not be good for sanding and finishing.

It may be good from a decoupling point of view though... say for gluing a baffle to the box.

Tony.

Thetwinmeister 4th February 2014 03:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by evanc (Post 3805012)
Try unibond 800.
Vacuum Pressing Systems -- Veneer Glue
It dries hard as a rock and is thin so it will soak into the grain and lock it up a bit.
Evan

Thanks for the reference, it looks like that is a PVA based glue. Promising, I will look into it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by wintermute (Post 3805017)
I used it (not 100% sure it was 303) for gluing the ports into my BR enclosures years ago. It is good for gap filling (my holes were slightly too big for the port). I don't think I would try to use it for joining MDF panels though. It is quite thick and may not squeze out of the joint like a PVA would, but we are talking 10years+ ago that I used it so memory may not so good. I think from memory it also does not dry rock hard (remains somewhat flexible) so I suspect it would not be good for sanding and finishing.

It may be good from a decoupling point of view though... say for gluing a baffle to the box.

Tony.

Oh, this is very good to know. I can't find any other hits on Google for a Fulaprene that is not 303, so it was most likely indeed Fulaprene 303. I may buy some just to experiment with. The idea of baffle decoupling is new to me, I was always under the impression bracing the heck out of the baffle was the way to go.

evanc 4th February 2014 03:31 AM

[QUOTE=Thetwinmeister;3805114]Thanks for the reference, it looks like that is a PVA based glue. Promising, I will look into it.


Unibond 800 is a modified urea resin formaldehyde two part adhesive with a translucent liquid resin and a powdered catalyst. Unibond 800 is designed to provide a rigid, gap filling glue line with faster than usual set times.

Thetwinmeister 4th February 2014 03:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by evanc (Post 3805126)
Unibond 800 is a modified urea resin formaldehyde two part adhesive with a translucent liquid resin and a powdered catalyst. Unibond 800 is designed to provide a rigid, gap filling glue line with faster than usual set times.

"Unibond One is our newest offering in the Unibond family of gluing products. Unibond One is a one part PVA adhesive specifically designed and formulated for wood veneering and laminating providing a extra hard glue line, long open work time and will block bleed through on commercially sliced veneers."

I read that first, thought you were referring to it.

Based on what I have read about glues, formaldehyde based wood glues are not as strong as PVA wood glues. The two part nature is also unappealing. Have you used Unibond 800? (not to be confused with unibond One hah)


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