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Old 12th September 2011, 01:41 PM   #21
ODougbo is offline ODougbo  United States
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Yes clamps are the ticket to a good project. Bar clamps are by far the cheapest around, I bought a new pair at woodworking show recently for $5 bucks (you do have to supply/find pipe).
The Jorgensen Clamps are certainly top notch, cabinet shop grade, but the cost went way up on them. They make look-a-like clamps, but they bend and don’t last long.
I haven’t seen any one mention the Gorilla Glue (polyurethane glue), it’s a little messy, but the glue will fill any gaps you may have. Don’t forget to wet the edge of the wood with water before using! Oh boy, it is strong!!
There’s another trick I use for the inside of cabinets, especially if you’re not sure the box is sealed - pick up a can of undercoating at an auto store (it doesn’t cost much). It takes a while to dry, set the box in the sun for a while if you can; let it harden up before final assembly. The product is also good for dampening, to a small degree.
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Old 12th September 2011, 01:47 PM   #22
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Fact: You can never have too many cramps/clamps. You can always find use for a couple more on any glue up.
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Old 12th September 2011, 02:03 PM   #23
Loren42 is offline Loren42  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ODougbo View Post
There’s another trick I use for the inside of cabinets, especially if you’re not sure the box is sealed - pick up a can of undercoating at an auto store (it doesn’t cost much). It takes a while to dry, set the box in the sun for a while if you can; let it harden up before final assembly. The product is also good for dampening, to a small degree.
The issue I have with those products is that they outgas VOCs and they may attack the glues used in the driver over time.

I usually apply a small 1/4 round or square stock on the inside corners with copious amounts of glue to strengthen the corners and insure air tight bonds.
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Old 12th September 2011, 07:09 PM   #24
amc is offline amc  Canada
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Originally Posted by Cal Weldon View Post

Get a circular saw and a straight edge or sawboard you can clamp in place for cutting. Nice cuts, relatively inexpensive and easier than a table saw which can be somewhat tricky if your experience is limited, not to mention expensive.

Cheers
I made a "door board" after seeing this video when trying to figure out how to cut a straight edge with my circular saw. Works like a charm, highly recommended.

MAKING STRAIGHT CUTS WITH A HOMEMADE JIG - YouTube
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Old 12th September 2011, 10:39 PM   #25
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It looks easier to use than the aluminum guide I bought. I think I'm going to build one. Thanks, AMC!
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Old 12th September 2011, 11:27 PM   #26
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the way I build my cabinet:

- I make a precise cutting plan: it's worthed to spend some time doing this ,
so everything fits well when assembling.
- I go to a lumber hard to have all my panels cut: they have these big wall saw that
cuts very precisely ( With my ability, it's a solution where you get everything
very well cut for a small amount of money). I just make , with a table saw, some
adjustment cut when needed and cut the drivers' holes with a Jasper circle jig and
a router.
- I assemble all the panels with clamps and glue only ( no nails nor screws)
- I use birch plywood (3/4 inch) : 3 panels thick (massive) with green glue.
_important is the planning before having the wood cut.
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Old 13th September 2011, 03:26 AM   #27
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I haven't seen anyone here suggest use of urethane (Gorilla, Pro etc) glue. While pricey it will strengthen your joints about 300% while also sealing any air leaks in the joints. Wear gloves while using it as it takes weeks to wear off skin. A quick sponge dampening of the wood before application also helps it work better.
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Old 13th September 2011, 10:44 AM   #28
ODougbo is offline ODougbo  United States
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I did also mention gorilla glue, yeah it cool, a bit messy, after about a week the stuff is concrete hard. Typically I’ll start with a big side e.g. 12” x 18”, lay that down. Cut the “rips” for the top, bottom, front back, port if it a slot vent. Do the best you can gluing the rips down the 12” x 18” side, let that dry. You’ll want to cut the last side bigger, something like 12 ¼ x 18 1/4”, the overhang is important because the cabinet is probably out of square slightly, etc. Use flush cut router OR belt sander to trim it up, pad sand to a smooth finish is so desired.
Here’s a handy router bit I found, ordered two yesterday: http://www.amanatool.com/routerbits/down-shear-trimmer-47094.html

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Old 13th September 2011, 11:55 AM   #29
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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A recent thread had some info on joint strength, posted by Cal. Surprisingly the urethane glues came bottom!
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Old 13th September 2011, 12:23 PM   #30
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- regular woodworking glue is strong enough for me. First, I put the glue and let it
soak in the wood and then I apply a second layer and clamp.
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