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Old 27th January 2011, 03:11 PM   #1
Krisfr is offline Krisfr  United States
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Default Wanted Tinning Solution

Does anyone have a tinning solution source besides the Allied one? About 10 bucks for 4 oz. is not my idea of a bargain....

Mouser Newark and Digikey are of no help.
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Old 29th January 2011, 11:25 AM   #2
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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A vat of molten tin to dip your component into for tin plating is far better.
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Old 29th January 2011, 11:45 AM   #3
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I think he means for tinning PCBs.
I use plumbers flux:

NPX_01071.JPG

smear a VERY thin layer on with a finger and use regular rosin core solder to 'tin' the board. Clean off the plumbers flux immediately.

NPX_01072.JPG

Fast and easy. The solder layer does an excellent job of protecting the copper from oxidization.
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Old 3rd February 2011, 12:39 AM   #4
Krisfr is offline Krisfr  United States
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Thanks John

Now, just WHAT do you use to remove the FLUX...?

My container says "Do not touch the Flux" Flush with water... Immediately.
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Old 3rd February 2011, 03:45 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krisfr View Post
Now, just WHAT do you use to remove the FLUX...?
Jeans...
Remove the flux from my finger? I wash my hands after I'm finished. Having done more than my fair share of plumbing, I can tell you that what you'll get on you to do 1000 PCBs will not even come close the exposure from plumbing one bathroom with copper.
The one I use (in the pic above) is actually a lot milder than some of the older stuff. It does contain zinc, so you'll need to get it off the board (or it can cause bridges between traces - I had this happen) and that is as easy as wiping it thoroughly with a dry cloth or paper towel.
You can do it without the flux, it just won't be as fast or as smooth. There is also electrical flux that may not be as corrosive, but costs a fortune.
For general soldering, I use a flux pen from MG:
Click the image to open in full size.
Good stuff and around $9. It's an option but since it evaporates, you'll need to do the board in sections - apply flux, tin, apply flux, tin...
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Old 13th February 2011, 04:58 PM   #6
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Whilst you're all talking fluxes, have any of you seen or even used the rosin /resin that is often the core in cored solder?
Years ago, I was given several lumps of this rosin that was also used in mass production tinning of components. This was clear, very pale yellow, had a faint aromatic odour and was quite brittle. It was used by dissolving in denatured alcohol and applied by spray, dip or brush. For tinning PCBs, it was fine and probably safest, considering the risks of poor clean-up with traditional zinc chloride fluxes. However, I never did discover what it actually was or the source.

For tinning PCBs coated with this flux, I used a very small solder pot and brushed the solder on with a bristle brush. This method and many powered variations of it, were quite common before automated systems and plating replaced all the handwork of the early years of PCB manufacture.

The point is that this stuff, like most industrial aids, was cheap. If it cost more than 1 cent per board it would have been too expensive. DIYs and techs are targeted to be fleeced here, in a market that has always endured extreme "value adding" even to marketing compressed air as a expensive commodity.

If anyone has experience or knowledge of a source of this rosin, we could all benefit, I think.
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Last edited by Ian Finch; 13th February 2011 at 05:01 PM.
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Old 14th March 2011, 08:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian Finch View Post
Whilst you're all talking fluxes, have any of you seen or even used the rosin /resin that is often the core in cored solder?
Years ago, I was given several lumps of this rosin that was also used in mass production tinning of components. This was clear, very pale yellow, had a faint aromatic odour and was quite brittle. It was used by dissolving in denatured alcohol and applied by spray, dip or brush. For tinning PCBs, it was fine and probably safest, considering the risks of poor clean-up with traditional zinc chloride fluxes. However, I never did discover what it actually was or the source.

For tinning PCBs coated with this flux, I used a very small solder pot and brushed the solder on with a bristle brush. This method and many powered variations of it, were quite common before automated systems and plating replaced all the handwork of the early years of PCB manufacture.

The point is that this stuff, like most industrial aids, was cheap. If it cost more than 1 cent per board it would have been too expensive. DIYs and techs are targeted to be fleeced here, in a market that has always endured extreme "value adding" even to marketing compressed air as a expensive commodity.

If anyone has experience or knowledge of a source of this rosin, we could all benefit, I think.
Its called Colofonium
Colofonium - Wikipedia
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Old 14th March 2011, 11:38 PM   #8
infinia is offline infinia  United States
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what the flux!
CG liquid solder flux GC Liquid Solder Flux (2 oz..) : 10-4202
Frys carries it, not sure if its in yer area.

really a little goes a long way! you could prolly stretch it out by mixing it with a little 100% denatured alcohol and applying it with an acid brush. cleaning the copper 1st with some polishing goes a long way too.
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Last edited by infinia; 14th March 2011 at 11:51 PM.
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Old 15th March 2011, 01:16 AM   #9
infinia is offline infinia  United States
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Quote:
The point is that this stuff, like most industrial aids, was cheap. If it cost more than 1 cent per board it would have been too expensive. DIYs and techs are targeted to be fleeced here, in a market that has always endured extreme "value adding" even to marketing compressed air as a expensive commodity.

If anyone has experience or knowledge of a source of this rosin, we could all benefit, I think.
oops just noticed the OP was a while back. hehe

Hi Ian
I think it's related to economies of scale, like all hobbies there are others much worse for the fleecing! like artist's supplies.
Good thing liquid flux keeps well and last a long time for most of us.
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Old 15th March 2011, 08:23 PM   #10
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in the verry rare occasion i make a pcb i do tin it my self too.
the cheapooo solution i found was simple.
hydrochloric acid (20% one, most stores sale this) is one of the components needed.
The other one is zinc.
galvanized plate gutter (not sure about how you english peeps call it)
Click the image to open in full size.
like those are perfect for the job.


Now, get a glass bottle, put the acid in it. But the whole bottle into a water bath, to make sure it remains cool.
Do not do this in your home, make sure you are outside.
Cut small pieces of the "gutter" and put it in the bottle of acid.
Make sure you wear gloves, glasses, whatever safety equipment you got.
Acid is acid.
The reaction will form heat, and bubbles in the solution.
A lot of both of them.
do not seal the bottle, as it may explode, or even if not when you would open it up it would be a nasty surprise.
The reaction lasts untill there are bubbles formed in the solution, and lasts for hours.
Once no bubbling occurs, the solution is ready to be sealed.

I give my pcb-s a bath in this solution, approx 5-10 secunds.
Then I can just use my soldering iron to tin the board.

I made this solution for one reason. The price stores ask here for a small 200 ml solution is around 5 times more than 1 liter of acid.

Beware, make sure even if you do try this, that while the solution forms bubbles, the gasses exiting the solution are poison.
Do not try to make 1 liter solution at first attempt.
Do not fill your glass bottle more than half way with the acid.
Leave the solution outside, out of reach by anyone/anything while the reaction is not finished, and keep an eye on it from a safe distance.

At first try, i would advise to not make more than 1-200 ml of the solution, even that will take a long time to use up.

And i take no responseability if you manage to damage your self in the process.
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