Moulding rubber - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Construction Tips

Construction Tips Construction techniques and tips

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10th January 2011, 07:15 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Ulverston in Cumbria
Default Moulding rubber

Has anyone used pouring rubber as used for making moulds. I would like to experiment with it for damping but do not know what I should be buying as there are a few to choose from. Two areas where I want to try it are in a plastic plinth and in a turntable platter.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th January 2011, 09:55 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Ulverston in Cumbria
I should have said liquid rubber as this stuff can also be brushed on to an object to make a mould. It would seem like the ideal stuff to use on items such as a Rega sub platter to fill the voids. As long as the platter is exactly level, the rubber should flow evenly over the surface and remain balanced.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th January 2011, 10:03 PM   #3
SY is offline SY  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
SY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chicagoland
Blog Entries: 1
I've made puppets this way- two part silicone is not cheap, but it's the best. Doesn't stick, flows well, cures fully.
__________________
And while they may not be as strong as apes, don't lock eyes with 'em, don't do it. Puts 'em on edge. They might go into berzerker mode; come at you like a whirling dervish, all fists and elbows.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th January 2011, 10:24 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
theAnonymous1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Anonymityville
If making a mould of a large disk, wouldn't you need to add some sort of support stucture to the mould to prevent the large surface area from drooping? Unless of course you make the mould large enough that is would support itself, but that seems like a waste of material.

Puppets?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th January 2011, 10:37 PM   #5
SY is offline SY  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
SY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chicagoland
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by theAnonymous1 View Post
Puppets?
Can't help it, my parents were artists, as is my wife. Thoroughly polluted me.
__________________
And while they may not be as strong as apes, don't lock eyes with 'em, don't do it. Puts 'em on edge. They might go into berzerker mode; come at you like a whirling dervish, all fists and elbows.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th January 2011, 12:50 AM   #6
jlsem is offline jlsem  United States
diyAudio Member
 
jlsem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Dallas,TX
For damping purposes you can use Devcon two-part urethane filled with barium titanate powder. Flexane is a little cheaper than silicone casting compounds.

http://www.devcon.com/products/produ...le%20Urethanes

John

Last edited by jlsem; 11th January 2011 at 12:52 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th January 2011, 12:52 AM   #7
SY is offline SY  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
SY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chicagoland
Blog Entries: 1
Depends. For filling for damping purposes, yes. For moldmaking, it might be tough to get good release.
__________________
And while they may not be as strong as apes, don't lock eyes with 'em, don't do it. Puts 'em on edge. They might go into berzerker mode; come at you like a whirling dervish, all fists and elbows.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th January 2011, 11:10 AM   #8
qusp is offline qusp  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
qusp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Brisbane, Australia
urethane is quite good for this purpose I would think, for the object itself that is, for the mold I would still recommend good old RTV (silicone 2 part) for the platter I would not go too far with the shore rating, perhaps 70-80A which will retain some flex, though very hard to the touch, just means its not brittle as some of the higher ratings. I use shore 70-80A hardness for casting my own connector housings and even quite small they are very strong due to having this small amount of flex. only thing is, casting something this size will create quite a bit of heat, so take precautions and read up on the process before you start. you could even go harder, but I wont give any specific advise towards making a platter as I dont have any experience there

Last edited by qusp; 11th January 2011 at 11:15 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th January 2011, 11:16 AM   #9
qusp is offline qusp  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
qusp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Brisbane, Australia
larger items actually cure/set quicker, but the larger it is, the hotter it gets because of the reaction
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rubber sheets oublie Multi-Way 8 29th October 2010 01:57 PM
Rubber washers on TRANSFORMERS??? kyrie48 Solid State 5 9th November 2007 09:16 PM
Latex and rubber the apprentice Multi-Way 6 11th March 2007 09:51 PM
concept rubber-band sub legendaryfrog Subwoofers 21 1st December 2006 04:16 PM
punctured rubber surround alvinlim Multi-Way 9 3rd April 2006 05:37 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 04:40 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2