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Old 2nd March 2010, 02:34 PM   #1
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Default need a thermoplastic adhesive to hold a heatsink screw

Here's the situation. My P101 heatsink taps are hopelessly filled with arctic alumina and would not retain a screw even with a threadlock compound.

I want to use that whitish "goop" sometimes seen in commercial amps to hold cable bundles together at the edge of a chassis or PCB. Specifically, I'd like one that I can later soften with a soldering iron. My hope is to just place a dollop of it at the heatsink screw head, on the top side of the PCB, to keep the screw from slowly unscrewing itself, which apparently it does. Does anybody know what that stuff is? I'm pretty sure its a kind of silicone, but harder than the typical caulk from the hardware store. But maybe it is some other kind of adhesive.
This chart leads me to think a "toughened" acrylic adhesive might be good for me because it can bond metal to plastic. Anybody know a brand of this?
Thermoplastic Adhesives
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Old 4th March 2010, 02:53 AM   #2
trd1587 is offline trd1587  Canada
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Well, What I can suggest you, is to fill the hole completely with epoxy plastic-Steel compound. Wait for it to cure, drill it and tap it. (you can work it as mild steel)

You can use Automotive tech-steel such as this
tech-steel | Sealants | Shop Supplies | Shop & Garage | Princess Auto

Ps: The problem with threadlockers is that it usually work best from anaerobic setups. Through and through is a no go with thread locker.
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Old 4th March 2010, 03:15 AM   #3
tinitus is offline tinitus  Europe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snellwilco View Post
My hope is to just place a dollop of it at the heatsink screw head, on the top side of the PCB, to keep the screw from slowly unscrewing itself, which apparently it does.
Maybe Locktite
But the usual type is used at screw/taphole

To be used on the outside, it is a special type you ask fore
I have seen something like that used on motor cycles
But maybe mostly to see if a screw have loosened

But I bet selflocking shims will hold it tight, nice and easy
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Old 4th March 2010, 04:31 AM   #4
audi0 is offline audi0  Australia
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Default Helicoil

Probably the best way is to tap it out to a bigger size and use a Helicoil Helicoil - Emhart Technologies Helicoil Distributor, Manufacturer, Agent, Helicoil Free Running, Helicoil Screw Lock, Helicoil Metric, Helicoil Screw Thread Inserts, USA

Steve
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