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Old 6th January 2010, 12:32 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Question Cusom Speacker Cases

Hi to all. I'm new on the forum and also new on building speaker cases. I have this parts :

2 x Dibeisi b1241

Max Power: 300W
Impedance: 4 ohms
Sensitivity: 92dB
Frequency: 25Hz - 4kHz
Magnet: 50 Oz

2 x g5002

Power max: 40W
Impedance: 4 ohms
Sensitivity: 91dB
Frequency: 500Hz - 10kHz
Magnet: 10 Oz

2 x Tweeter Piezzo F32

85x85 * 100 W * 91 dB * 500Hz-20kHz

2 x Filter 3-way car 200w 4ohm HV 623

maximum load 200 W
crossing frequency: 700/5.000 Hz
Cutting gradient: 6 dB / octave
connecting plugs gold

Can anybody help me with the dimensions, building techniques or other advises regarding the components ? Thank you !
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Old 6th January 2010, 06:12 PM   #2
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Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Cesena - Italy
You need a lot of other informations about your drivers ( read Thiele & Small parameters ) to achieve this goal.
This could be an issue due to the car-audio nature of your components.
After you get theese parameters ( there are softwares tha can help you measuring ) you have to put them in a simulation software and start playing with dimensions, porting, damping and so on....
Good luck and learning !
Cheers !
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Old 6th January 2010, 09:49 PM   #3
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Join Date: Jan 2010
I want them for home use. I'll check the parameters and then get back here ...
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Old 7th January 2010, 02:41 PM   #4
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Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Cesena - Italy
Quote:
Originally Posted by OmYcroN View Post
I want them for home use.
That was clear !

Quote:
Originally Posted by OmYcroN View Post
I'll check the parameters and then get back here ...
I doubt wou'll find here much more than some summary suggests but .... try !
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Old 11th January 2010, 11:50 PM   #5
dangus is offline dangus  Canada
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Join Date: May 2004
Location: Vancouver Island
A rough guess is to use the vented box that the manufacturer has designed for the woofers. It's OK to change dimensions as long as the total volume inside doesn't change. The port diameter and length shouldn't be changed, though. The smaller speaker (5" ?) should probably be in a subenclosure, sealed off from the main box. That volume will have be subtracted when calculating the total box volume.
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Old 12th January 2010, 12:26 AM   #6
dangus is offline dangus  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Vancouver Island
When it comes to building, it's very very good to have a router equipped with a flush trimming bit. That allows you to cut some box panels oversize, then trim them exactly. You can remove roughly sawn edges, or trim a bunch of panels to the same size. It allows you to make a nice-looking box that you don't have to apologize for without a table saw. With a simple circle jig that you can make yourself, and a straight or spiral bit, you can cut _perfectly_ round holes for drivers. As a last resort, a router can even be used to cut up panels by taking multiple passes along a straight edge. (A long straight-edge is essential as a reference... a piece of shelving with a finished laminate edge can work. Or the factory machined edge of a sheet of MDF.) It's useful to get the lumberyard where you buy the plywood (or MDF or particle board) to make some preliminary cuts. This makes it much easier to transport, and can save you making long awkward cuts at home.

A router is the single greatest power tool for speaker building. Between 2nd hand and "made in China" you may be able to get a router and a set of carbide bits for under $50 (or Euros).

For holding the cabinet together, I use butt joints, white glue, and countersunk decking screws. Since the glue should provide the real strength, temporary clamps, nails, or staples may be good enough. A router could cut more elaborate joints that look better and are stronger than butt joints, if you're willing to make the extra effort in setting up the cuts. I usually fill the countersink holes with dowel plugs, which are then trimmed flush with the router. This looks very nice on a varnished plywood cabinet, at least if the screws are evenly spaced. On painted cabinets, the plugs don't stay perfectly flush over time (moisture affects wooden plugs differently than MDF...). Wood filler or auto body filler may be easier. Or just wrap the box in "rat fur" carpet or real animal skins.
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