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Old 12th November 2009, 08:24 PM   #1
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Default Drilled some holes crooked; what's a good filler?

Hello friends,

I drilled some holes crooked and I'm wondering what can I fill them with so I can drill new holes with a drill press, this time

Wood putty/filler won't work; it's too brittle and has no structural strength. I was thinking maybe there was some sort of two part epoxy I could use for this purpose or wood glue and saw dust mix?
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Old 12th November 2009, 08:38 PM   #2
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Try JB Weld, available in hardware and automotive stores. It takes 24 hr to cure, but it's tough as nails.
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Old 12th November 2009, 08:40 PM   #3
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Liquid Steel, but it's expensive.
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Old 12th November 2009, 09:12 PM   #4
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Vote #2 for JB Weld - amazing stuff.
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Old 12th November 2009, 11:16 PM   #5
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What are you working with?

Is it metal or wood?

How are these holes being used?

Can you just use a larger drill to clean up the out of line hole. . .larger drill being used in a drill press that is.
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Old 12th November 2009, 11:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJL21193 View Post
Vote #2 for JB Weld - amazing stuff.
Funny I just used some of this stuff to fix my car. I thought it was mostly used for metal. It would not be such a good thing if it was a lot harder than MDF. I have to be able to drill through it again and the MDF. The new holes will mostly be through the fixed part also through the MDF.

I should have done it right the first time
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Last edited by Jimmy154; 12th November 2009 at 11:28 PM.
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Old 12th November 2009, 11:27 PM   #7
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Old 12th November 2009, 11:36 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmy154 View Post
Funny I just used some of this stuff to fix my car. I thought it was mostly used for metal. It would not be such a good thing if it was a lot harder than MDF.
You didn't mention it was MDF...did ya?

Automotive body filler would be a better choice on MDF - you know, Bondo?
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Old 13th November 2009, 04:27 AM   #9
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use West System #105 epoxy with #205 hardener and mix with #404 High Strength Filler. Use #206 hardener if you want a longer cure time. You can cast a threaded hole with this stuff by spraying the fastener you want to use with WD-40 or even cooking spray for a release agent, wiping off the excess, and then sticking it in the epoxy/filler mixture and letting it cure. You'll need some sort of jig to hold the fastener in the proper alignment of course. This trick came in handy more than once when I used to own a boat.

West System products available at your local marine store.
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Old 27th November 2009, 10:51 PM   #10
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#3 for JB Weld.

Used it to fill a duff hole in an armboard for an Ariston RD-11S which I subsequently re-drilled for an RB300. The hole intersected the original material (some kind of plastic) and the JB Weld. It was flawless. Before use the armboard was tapped, dropped and otherwise abused albeit gently to see if the weld piece would come loose. Not even close.

Some might say that CTE mismatch could be a problem but if it's an indoor domestic application it won't be.

Good luck

Matt
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