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ginetto61 28th October 2009 09:21 PM

Working with breadboards
 
Hello to Everyone !

I would be very interested to know if:
1) a breadboard is still the best tool to build a prototype :rolleyes:
2) the quality of a stereo amp schema can be assessed just building one channel. :confused:
Actually my intention would be to mix the L and R signals at the input and using just one speaker to test and optimize it.
It is the first time that I try to convert a schema in a prototype, so I am very confused and unexperienced. :(
Building just one channel a time seems to me a much simpler approach then making all the two channels.
If the prototype channel will work then I will build another one completely identical.
Suggestions will be very much appreciated. :o
Thank you very much and kind regards, :)
gino

nigelwright7557 28th October 2009 09:51 PM

I get along well with veroboard or stripboard.

If one amp sounds great then I cant think of a reason why it shouldnt sound good in a stereo pair.

ginetto61 28th October 2009 10:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nigelwright7557 (Post 1963707)
I get along well with veroboard or stripboard..

Thank you very much indeed for your kind and helpful reply
I understand that with these boards soldering is needed
Nebertheless I have read of some issues like bad contacts with breadboards
After all soldering is much more reliable connection

If one amp sounds great then I cant think of a reason why it shouldnt sound good in a stereo pair
I think the same as you, I am a strong believer in dual mono construction
By the way I saw a lot of very good preamp and amp where the two channels are identical either they were in the same chassis or not.
I will take some veroboards then.
Thanks a lot again
Kind regards,
gino

Iain McNeill 29th October 2009 12:37 AM

Are you referring to the "old school" breadboarding technique of screws & dish washers holding down all the connections?

I've done this in the past and it works. If you use soft wood its harder to get a reliable contact than with a harder wood. Also, this technique makes all the leads really long and so parasitic inductance and capacitance can become a problem at HF if you're not careful.

And then there's the rats nest of wires with low impedance, high voltage supplies on them. If you've never shorted out a 50,000uF cap charged to 40V before - it's quite an event.

P.S. building one channel first is definitely recommended. You learn so much on the first one - building one first saves time in the long run.

dangus 29th October 2009 12:38 AM

It may not be critical for AF designs, but for RF there are techniques like "ugly" or "dead bug" and "Manhattan" that use a plain PCB as a ground plane.
Manhattan" style PCB Construction

Iain McNeill 29th October 2009 01:00 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Like Nigel Wright, here's how I do it.

ginetto61 29th October 2009 05:15 PM

[QUOTE=Iain McNeill;1963895]Are you referring to the "old school" breadboarding technique of screws & dish washers holding down all the connections? I've done this in the past and it works. If you use soft wood its harder to get a reliable contact than with a harder wood

Good evening !
I am referring to something like this one
http://www.robotroom.com/Joystick/Breadboard.jpg
There are clips to make contacts

Also, this technique makes all the leads really long and so parasitic inductance and capacitance can become a problem at HF if you're not careful.
And then there's the rats nest of wires with low impedance, high voltage supplies on them.
If you've never shorted out a 50,000uF cap charged to 40V before - it's quite an event

To be more precise I intend to experiment a solid state line stage
60V single supply rails ... 470uF of capacitance max on the board
A very simple line stage

P.S. building one channel first is definitely recommended.
You learn so much on the first one - building one first saves time in the long run

Thank you very much for your kind and valuable advice.
Honestly I thought it were much easier, just two bjts per channel ...
I should pass to a only one bjt per channel ... if only I found a suitable schematic ...

Thanks again and kind regards,
gino

ginetto61 29th October 2009 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iain McNeill (Post 1963912)
Like Nigel Wright, here's how I do it.

Very nice work !
I am very beginner nevertheless the idea of implementing a project is very exciting to me
It would be the first time I make something
I modded some amps in the past, with debatable results
Kind regards,
gino


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