Veneering Technique for curved edges. - diyAudio
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Old 13th August 2009, 02:00 PM   #1
Juggy is offline Juggy  Canada
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Default Veneering Technique for curved edges.

Hello,

I was recently looking at the Totem acoustic loudspeakers and was wondering how those cabinets are veneering while having curved (routered) front edges. I'm not aware of how this is done, if anyone has a DIY it would be much appreciated.

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Juggy
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Old 13th August 2009, 03:38 PM   #2
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Thin veneer and a steam iron?
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Old 13th August 2009, 05:28 PM   #3
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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Quote:
Originally posted by Cal Weldon
Thin veneer and a steam iron?

Provided that you're only curving in one direction, yes the wood glue ironing method works like a charm. You can even wrap around 45 degree beveled edges in the long grain direction.

You do need to practice your technique around curves - even though the iron-on method is imminently easier than contact cement, air bubbles and wrinkles are still possible.

Don't try to use solvent based adhesives (contact or otherwise) with paper backed or natural veneers if your finishes or top coats will include alcohol or solvent based carriers.
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Old 13th August 2009, 06:00 PM   #4
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"Don't try to use solvent based adhesives (contact or otherwise) with paper backed or natural veneers if your finishes or top coats will include alcohol or solvent based carriers."

Do try hide glue. Not the stuff in a bottle, but the stuff you get in
"pearl" form and heat up yourself. Do yourself a favor and avoid
paper backed veneers. They don't stand the test of time IME.

Veneer san be curved in both directions (compound) with heat, moisture,
and patience.

A vacuum bag might be a good clamping device depending on the size
and shape parts.

I'm too lazy to do google research to find the speakers you mention,
next time a link would make it easier for folks to follow (unless
everyone but me knows about Totam acoustic..)

Cheers,

Michael
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Old 13th August 2009, 07:30 PM   #5
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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Michael:

http://www.totemacoustic.eu/english/index.htm

"new and improved" website

FWIW, I've veneered quite a few pairs of enclosures over the past 10yrs or so, using paper and 2ply wood backed veneers and the iron-on method with yellow wood glue (as opposed to hide glue).
It's almost as quick a contact cement, yet allows for accurate alignment for continuous grain wrapping, and aside from air bubbles and wrinkles from inattention /lack of complete ironing pressure, I've yet to have any failures.



No doubt there's a special art to working with "real"/solid veneers - on the few occasions I've tried, I've had big issues with splitting, and grain matching of flitches on larger panels.

To be honest, it's due to laziness and impatience to learn the required skills that explains the evolution of my personal design aesthetic.
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Old 13th August 2009, 10:35 PM   #6
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thanks for the link

I didn't see any curved veneer but I didn't look at all ~40 models of
loudspeakers on the Totem website...

I think the beveled fronts are probably solid at least for the thickness
of the bevel.

Chris:
I've heard of the yellow glue-and-iron method, but after a failed
experiment with paper backed veneer I decided to stick with tried
and true pearl hide glue. I'm using it on musical instruments, though
(harp soundboards and decorative inlay) so I would guess a speaker
cabinet would be somewhat less demanding.

A hot roller would be useful. I often heat a section up with the iron,
then immediately so over it with a roller and high pressure. Sometimes
one needs to make a little slit along the grain to let air escape.

Iguess I was imagining something like a B&W with veneer
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Old 14th August 2009, 12:11 AM   #7
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I use to own a pair of the forest.they use hardwood quarter rounds on the 2 front edges.if you look closely at the pic in the link,you can see the round over is different than the veneer.

http://www.totemacoustic.eu/english/...forest_03.html
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Old 14th August 2009, 01:29 AM   #8
lowpoke is offline lowpoke  Australia
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My wife's a furniture maker (unfortunately speaker cabinets don't come under HER definition of furniture) and I know she tends to often use solid wood edges in the same wood as the veneer used on the rest of the piece. If executed well, it's often difficult to pick with the untrained eye.
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Old 14th August 2009, 04:34 AM   #9
Juggy is offline Juggy  Canada
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Quote:
Originally posted by chainenoble
I use to own a pair of the forest.they use hardwood quarter rounds on the 2 front edges.if you look closely at the pic in the link,you can see the round over is different than the veneer.

http://www.totemacoustic.eu/english/...forest_03.html

Yes, i see that, that would definitely make things easier.
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Old 14th August 2009, 09:01 AM   #10
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Veneers are available for such purpose. U can fix them on curved surfaces as easy as fixing on flat surfaces.

Gajanan Phadte
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