Feeding a lowdspeaker with a SI Tamp? - diyAudio
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Old 27th November 2006, 08:03 PM   #1
ccereda is offline ccereda  Europe
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Default Feeding a lowdspeaker with a SI Tamp?

Hi to all:

I would like to make an amplifier for my HT system, I just need 3 extra channels.

I read in a post that it is possible to feed a Tamp with the same signal in both channels and then connect both speaker outputs to the speaker.

I would like to have a confirmation of this and I would like to know if I have to modify anything in order to do this operation.

In this case I would use a T Amp for every surround speaker and another one for the centre channel. Does this look OK?

I am quite new to electronics and DIY so I would appreciate simplicity.

Of course any suggested alternative will be considered.

Thank you
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Old 27th November 2006, 08:14 PM   #2
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If you are asking if you can connect both sets of T-Amp outputs to the same speaker, this is not possible. This is bridging the amplifier, and because the amplifier is already bridged internally, you can't do it this way. The speaker grounds must remain isolated from each other and from the board power ground.

If you are asking if you can connect both inputs together and then connect two separate speakers, each playing the same thing, there should be no problem with this.

--Buckapound
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Old 27th November 2006, 11:56 PM   #3
lanierb is offline lanierb  United States
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It sounds to me like he is referring to a parallel setup (identical input signals, both pos to same speaker, both neg to same speaker), not a bridged one. Is there any reason you can't hook up the 2 T-Amp channels in parallel?

Lanier
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Old 28th November 2006, 06:47 AM   #4
ccereda is offline ccereda  Europe
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Thanky you, but in the two answers I don't understand what is the differences between parallel setup and bridged.
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Old 28th November 2006, 09:55 AM   #5
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridged...led_amplifiers

I must admit that I'm completely ignorant and unknowing, but I believe that you're thinking about a paralleled setup, actually. Judging from the Wikipedia article at least - that bridging seems to involve the inversion of the signal to one channel of the amplifier.

Bridging T-amps is stated to be impossible, but this setup may be possible. I don't know how, but not all hope is lost.

Paralleling will make the two amps see a 4 ohm speaker as 8 ohms. In the case of the T-amp, I believe that this wouldn't really give you increased power in the end.

Also, the offset inherent in Tripath amps seems to be an impediment.

BTW: I'm guesstimating! Please disregard my speculation if it conflicts with the opinion of anyone more knowledgeable.
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Old 28th November 2006, 10:57 AM   #6
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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The Sonic Impact amp can NOT be bridged. Please see the FAQ.

It can be paralleled, but it won't work well or sound good. Might even result in damage to the amp in the long term.

If you want to do a biwire/biamp thing - it is possible.

Can you give us more details on your setup? Number of speakers and number of channels?
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Old 28th November 2006, 01:29 PM   #7
ccereda is offline ccereda  Europe
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Here are the details of my future setup (I am finishing my new listening room):

Dvd player connected to a 5.1 preamplifier

5 speakers:

2 front driven by a solid state amplifier 250 W / channel class A/B (my stereo amplifier).

2 surround to be driven by a Tamp I think these speakers are not than important and are small with a sensitivity of 91 Db so the 6 w of a modded Tamp should be enough. I tested them driven by a stereo integrated Tamp and sound beutifoul and loud.

1 centre . Since it is very important and it has to compete against two big well feed towers. I guess that the 6 w are not enough, on top of this I would have a spare channel so I wanted to use it.
The speaker is a JM-LAB antecessor of the Electra 900 NOT biwirable despite the fact that has two midrange and one tweeter.

No subwoofer my left and right speakers start deep enough (20Hz26kHz, +/-3dB)

Off topic:
I bought 4 toroidal cores of about 10 mm diameter and I put 29 turns of 0.5 mm copper wire, then replaced the inductors of the Tamp, I have been told that this is the correct value but I can not measure.
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Old 28th November 2006, 05:26 PM   #8
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Hello,

Re: "I read in a post that it is possible to feed a Tamp with the same signal in both channels and then connect both speaker outputs to the speaker."

I recall reading that someone did successfully run a 'paralleled' set-up.

See this thread, where towards the end, paralleled usage is described and pictured:

http://www.audioasylum.com/scripts/t.pl?f=amp&m=74712

Hope that helps . . . .

Robert_S
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Old 29th November 2006, 03:49 AM   #9
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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Just because you CAN run the S.I. channels in parallel does not mean you should. There are other Tripath chips that are designed for this, tho.

ccereda: I think for your set up the Sonic Impact will work great for the surround channels. You are correct that you will need more power for the center channel.

If you wanted to run T-amps on all channels you should have a look at the 41Hz.com kits. They are not expensive and there are many to choose from.

Hope that helps.
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Old 29th November 2006, 04:44 AM   #10
v-bro is offline v-bro  Netherlands
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Hi all,

T-amps on the rear, AMP11 from 41hz.com is relatively easy to build 100w mono for the center. AMP9 offers the possibility for successful parallelling (4 channels, you can parallel two for center and use the other two for rear).

AMP9(49 EUR.!) is much like AUDIODIGIT MC4x100 (195 EUR.!).

It uses the same chip (TAA4100A).....
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