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Old 2nd October 2006, 12:48 PM   #1
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Default Texas Instruments TAS5261

What do folks make of this new class D integrated solution?

http://www.ti.com/corp/docs/landing/...+EM+tas5261-em

Certainly looks neat and offers respectable performance.

Any products confirmed as using these yet? And do you think its of any interest to the DIY market?
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Old 2nd October 2006, 01:24 PM   #2
ssanmor is offline ssanmor  Spain
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Mmmm.
Max power established at a THD of 10%... very professional

Perhaps Hypex, LCAudio and us, Coldamp, should rate our products at 50% higher power.
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Old 2nd October 2006, 01:53 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally posted by ssanmor
Mmmm.
Max power established at a THD of 10%... very professional

Perhaps Hypex, LCAudio and us, Coldamp, should rate our products at 50% higher power.
Bit out of context that.

125 W into 8 Ω at <0.09% THD+N
220 W into 6 Ω at 10% THD+N
315 W into 4 Ω at 10% THD+N

The 125w into 8ohm and less than 0.1% isn't bad at all for an integrated solution. Certainly better than the Gainclones and competitive with the higher power t-amps.
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Old 2nd October 2006, 02:22 PM   #4
ssanmor is offline ssanmor  Spain
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Yes, that's right, 0.1% at rated power is quite ok, but I was only saying that specifying 300w at 10% is next to useless and a bit tricky (marketing stuff, anyway).
They would have seemed much more serious if they had said 180W at 1% 4 ohm (it must be something like that). Nothing more...
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Old 2nd October 2006, 02:38 PM   #5
BWRX is offline BWRX  United States
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The max switching frequency of the TAS5261 is stated as 432kHz, while TIs other chips have a max of only 192kHz. They obviously did something different with this chip.
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Old 3rd October 2006, 05:52 AM   #6
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Default Re: Texas Instruments TAS5261

Quote:
Originally posted by ShinOBIWAN

Any products confirmed as using these yet? And do you think its of any interest to the DIY market? [/B]

I've ordered some samples, if I can solder these, I'll report back here on the result. Should be interesting.
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Old 3rd October 2006, 11:27 AM   #7
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@ericallan: Ive ordered some samples too. Obviously PWM input is needed; did you figure out how to do that?
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Old 3rd October 2006, 02:48 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally posted by SmellOfPoo
@ericallan: Ive ordered some samples too. Obviously PWM input is needed; did you figure out how to do that?
This page might help:
http://homepages.which.net/~paul.hil...enerators.html
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Old 3rd October 2006, 03:14 PM   #9
BWRX is offline BWRX  United States
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You can generate a PWM signal from an audio signal using a simple 555 timer. You can either figure out how to do it from the datasheets or search the web for a schematic.

Quote:
Originally posted by ericallan
I've ordered some samples, if I can solder these, I'll report back here on the result. Should be interesting.
Do you have an evaluation board or have you designed a board for this chip?
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Old 4th October 2006, 10:42 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by BWRX
You can generate a PWM signal from an audio signal using a simple 555 timer. You can either figure out how to do it from the datasheets or search the web for a schematic.
Do you have an evaluation board or have you designed a board for this chip?

I'm wondering if this might do the trick:

http://shop.dataip.co.uk/products.html?prodid=81

Click the image to open in full size.
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