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Old 9th June 2005, 10:28 AM   #1
Mick_F is offline Mick_F  Germany
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Default Sonic Impact PSU current

I am currently looking for a power supply for a Sonic Impact amp. I was thinking of a 13.8 supply unit but I dont know how much current it should deliver. I have the choice of 2 A and 4 A units. Is the 2 A unit sufficient? More precisely, it delivers 2 A steadily and can go up to 4 A in peaks (the 4 A unit goes up to 6 A in peaks).

Thanks for your advice.

Mick
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Old 9th June 2005, 01:37 PM   #2
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Hallo Mick ,
2A reichen normalerweise aus, aber 4A können auf keinen Fall schaden .
Mein T-Amp hängt an einem Voltkraft 16A ! mit 0,5 Farad Auto Cap .
Ist super mit dem T-Amp , aber ein klein wenig Overkill .

Grüße von Bruchsal (die Spargelstadt) nach Köln !

Jürgen
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Old 9th June 2005, 02:15 PM   #3
el`Ol is offline el`Ol  Germany
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I tried the T-amp with an analog lab power supply and I made the observation that it plays with a lot more drive and rhythmization when a heavy current limit is used.

Oliver
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Old 10th June 2005, 01:47 AM   #4
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Default Power supply question

Mick_F
The SI is rated to 15 watts per ch. into 4 ohms. This is about 2.7 amps total but remember that this is at 10% distortion so heavily into clipping. A more realistic value would be 11 watts @ 1% dist. This is still into clipping but only slightly. Playing music takes much less power than test signals and I have run one of these units quite successfully with a 1.25 A supply and a large reservoir cap (22,000uf) to take care of the peaks. I would think you would be quite happy with the smaller supply as long as you also use a large auxiliary cap.
Try both and let us know your impressions.
Roger
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Old 10th June 2005, 02:24 AM   #5
el`Ol is offline el`Ol  Germany
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Unfortunately my power supply doesn`t go below 100mA, so I can`t say exactly where it sounds best.
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Old 10th June 2005, 12:30 PM   #6
Mick_F is offline Mick_F  Germany
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Thanks for your advice.

Using an adjustable lab power supply is a good idea. I can borrow one so I will try that too.

I will also exchange the caps. Is there any illustrated description availabe on the web showing the location of the caps to be exchanged?

Sorry for these questions, which most probably have been discussed extensively already....

Mick
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Old 10th June 2005, 02:30 PM   #7
dnsey is offline dnsey  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Is there any illustrated description availabe on the web showing the location of the caps to be exchanged?
Here

(And associated links)
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Old 10th June 2005, 03:06 PM   #8
BFNY is offline BFNY  United States
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Default Re: Power supply question

Quote:
Originally posted by sx881663
Mick_F
Playing music takes much less power than test signals and I have run one of these units quite successfully with a 1.25 A supply and a large reservoir cap (22,000uf) to take care of the peaks. I would think you would be quite happy with the smaller supply as long as you also use a large auxiliary cap.
Roger
I agree, and use of these 2A 12V Parts Express 120-536 supplies to power the SI for my computer speakers.

http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=120-536

They are linear regulated units, with a fairly heavy transformer, At $15. it is a good deal. This, with a big cap(s), will beat the crap out of any wallwart and also the regulation will make sure you don't fry the SI amp with overvoltage.

Bob
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Old 10th June 2005, 04:52 PM   #9
el`Ol is offline el`Ol  Germany
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I just listened to Stravinsky`s Sacre and I find that even heavy bassdrum attacks sound better with 100mA limit.
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Old 13th June 2005, 06:07 PM   #10
el`Ol is offline el`Ol  Germany
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I just tried a trimmer in series instead of the active current limit. Almost same result, but not very practicable, because you have to correct the trimmer at any volume change. I adjusted the trimmer up to 70 Ohm, dependent on the volume.
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