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Old 18th May 2013, 06:46 PM   #1
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Default Class D amp distortion causes

Hello:

First post in the Class D forum, and first DIY project with a Class D amp. I can give a bunch of information if needed, but I have a fairly straightforward question. Inputting a clean sine wave into a PowerPhysics A-404 board. Input shown in blue.

Output is 24V into a 8.7 ohm resistive load, shown in red. I should note that the output is actually stepped up through a transformer into a 200 ohm load, but the amp is seeing a nominal 8 ohm load. The FFT is taken directly at the Class D output, not on the output of the transformer.

Any reason why the distortion has gone up a factor of 50?
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Old 18th May 2013, 09:45 PM   #2
PChi is offline PChi  United Kingdom
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I don't have a good reason but have a few thoughts.

The magnetizing inductance of the transformer is adding a load in parallel with the resistive load reflected from the secondary. This will not be totally linear and will react with the output impedance to create distortion.
Does the distortion reduce linearly with level? There might be a threshold beyond which the distortion inceases rapidly with further increases in level which would indicate that that the tranformer is saturating.

The amplifier might be sensitive to the power supply ouput impedance.
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Old 18th May 2013, 10:28 PM   #3
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Thanks for your reply.

I considered the nonlinear load caused by the transformer due to the B-H characteristic. To try and compensate, I made sure to run this 60 Hz transformer at 50% of its nominal voltage. Definitely not a saturated core. I would have expected this to be sufficient, since an amplifier is capable of driving a nonlinear loudspeaker load.

Regarding the above, no- distortion is generally unrelated to output voltage.

Power supply output impedance - good point. I am using a 150W switching supply, but I will try and add some extra capacitance on the 48VDC output to see if there is a difference. Will also look into adding the load at the amp instead of after the OPT.
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Old 18th May 2013, 11:10 PM   #4
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If you have doubts whether the high distortions are related to the transformer load - simply load the amp without transformer directly into 8R and see if the results change.
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Old 19th May 2013, 12:08 AM   #5
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Transformer removed, pure 9 ohm load. Also added 2200uF on the 48V rail, which isn't much, but didn't make any difference.

Only need 36V for the H-bridge, so a 48V supply should be adequate.
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Old 19th May 2013, 11:33 AM   #6
PChi is offline PChi  United Kingdom
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I have only some semi randon thoughts.
Possibly the Class D or swithing supply high frequency noise is corrupting the signal source or confusing the Sound Card Analog to digital converter.
It might be worth investigating the high frequency noise generated by the Class D and the power supply and trying to reduce it.
Is the plot of the clean sine wave measured at the amplifier input with it driving the load?
Possibly the wiring arrangement is causing problems.
Has anyone else independently verified the distortion of a PowerPhysics A-404?

Last edited by PChi; 19th May 2013 at 11:48 AM.
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Old 19th May 2013, 11:50 AM   #7
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It is good that the distortions do not change much by the transformer load, but less good that the amp generally has high distortion.

Most dominant mechanisms for distortion in class D:
- Switching distortion, usually dominated by dead time distortion
- Modulator distortion caused by feedback
- Modulator distortion caused by a poor triangle generator (clocked only)

If you are suffering from dead time distortion you can see by comparing distortion at no load vs distortion at nominal load.

If you are suffering from modulator distortion you can see at the comparator input. Preferred shape of the carrier and/or carrier residuals is close to triangular.
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Old 19th May 2013, 12:22 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PChi View Post
Possibly the Class D or swithing supply high frequency noise is corrupting the signal source or confusing the Sound Card Analog to digital converter.
...good point...

@zigzag: Do you use a low pass filter to keep the carrier artefacts away from your sound card?
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Old 19th May 2013, 02:57 PM   #9
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Quote:
Possibly the Class D or swithing supply high frequency noise is corrupting the signal source or confusing the Sound Card Analog to digital converter.
Interesting you should say this; during the development of the front-end signal source, I discovered the Class D amp would send bursts of energy into my phase locked loop LP filter, causing it to wobble in and out of phase lock. I had to put the circuit inside a shielded enclosure, now all is perfect. Also, note in the very first post that I was able to get a good FFT of the input signal, which was taken simultaneously with the loaded output. So worst case it would muck up ch. 2 but not ch. 1.

Quote:
It might be worth investigating the high frequency noise generated by the Class D and the power supply and trying to reduce it.
It appears the majority of noise is generated by the amp, not the power supply. Although the amp has its own output filter, I also used the leakage of the transformer and a 0.015uF film/foil capacitor on the transformer secondary to filter out that last bit of noise. Didn't want to add too much capacitive load, as this can make the amp run unstable. Other than these small steps, I wouldn't really know what to do without upsetting something.

Quote:
Is the plot of the clean sine wave measured at the amplifier input with it driving the load?
Yes, definitely. There is a 0.01% sine wave feeding into the amp while driving loads from 50W to 100W. Same exact output distortion characteristic.

Quote:
Has anyone else independently verified the distortion of a PowerPhysics A-404?
Not to my knowledge, and if you aren't an OEM, the manufacturer has little interest in speaking with you. I had some email correspondence with the president, and it was short-lived.

Quote:
It is good that the distortions do not change much by the transformer load, but less good that the amp generally has high distortion.
Yes, that is encouraging. I am considering throwing in my AB subwoofer amp just to prove everything else is proper and reasonable.

Quote:
Do you use a low pass filter to keep the carrier artefacts away from your sound card?
Apparently not. This would imply the output is inadequately filtered, relying on the additional assumed inductance of the loudspeaker. This is typical, but I do have a large leaky power transformer in series which I would think is sufficient. If not, I have two thoughts:

1. The very first post showed a simultaneous capture of the input and output, while driving load. Since the blue input is verified to be clean (same signal I get from the source when Class D is powered down) I think I have validated that my sound card is not suffering from some type of EMI issue generated by the amp or switching supply.

2. If the amplified output is indeed clean, but the sound card is incorrectly capturing carrier artifacts and reporting as harmonic distortion, I need to filter this signal. Can I do this passively? Is this some type of aliasing problem? I will say, by the scope the sine wave looks great, but it's not easy to detect 0.5% THD with the eye. What I have been using is a 'filter' consisting of an auxiliary split bobbin power transformer to isolate and scale down the output suitable for the sound card. Would this not be sufficient to keep the sound card happy? If not, I wonder if I want this carrier-ridden signal driving my sensitive load.

Thanks for your knowledge base; I admit I have limited experience with Class D, but I do have enough equipment to troubleshoot and enough analog understanding to be dangerous and creative.
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Old 19th May 2013, 08:06 PM   #10
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So I confirmed that I was able to change the DC power supply from 37V to 50V with no discernible change in FFT spectrum. Also was able to change input source such that output into 9 ohms changed from 20V to 28V rms with no change in FFT (DC set to 48V).

Attached a few pictures of the output; one is both output pins simultaneously. Looks reasonable; I would think the DC offset is normal due to PWM+filter action.

Second picture is output at split bobbin isolation signal transformer.

If this is not a filtering issue, it must just be a junk amplifier ?
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