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-   -   Linear or SMPS for Classd amp (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/class-d/216552-linear-smps-classd-amp.html)

john dozier 21st July 2012 02:37 AM

Linear or SMPS for Classd amp
 
I am building a Classd Audio amp. I can use either a linear or an SMPS. Which do you suggest and why. I am an old tube amp guy and know nothing about class d. Thus my question? Thanks and kindest regards

marce 21st July 2012 09:04 AM

He He this could be a fun thread.
My view is either, as long as they are well designed and well layed out, layout or bad layout being the biggest cause of SMPS's getting bad press.

dangus 21st July 2012 10:49 AM

Switching if you can buy one off the shelf or have proven plans to follow. Linear if you have to design it yourself. I suspect the switcher will provide better performance since it is regulated.

hochopeper 21st July 2012 11:07 AM

Both can be excellent or poor depending on the implementation.

AFAIK not all SMPS are regulated. A linear supply may be regulated if you are willing to deal with the heat/losses that will come with this. A linear supply should have a very large transformer for best performance.

I have never built a Class D amp but I have built Class AB amplifiers with SMPS supplies with very satisfying results. For an idea of how good a Class AB amp can perform with a SMPS have a look in the thread for the LME49830 based 'The Wire' amp where opc measured its performance with a high quality regulated SMPS.

nigelwright7557 22nd July 2012 12:37 AM

I prefer linear supplies for their simplicity. Easy to fix if/when they do go wrong.
A faulty SMPS could be a pig to fix.

john dozier 22nd July 2012 01:12 AM

Thanks for all the input. I think I will buy one of each (they are fairly cheap, especially in kit form) and try them with the amp. I will use which ever sounds best and keep the other as either a back-up or a bench supply. Thanks again for the suggestions. Regards

ssanmor 22nd July 2012 11:12 AM

You can get better performance with a regulated SMPS. As with any other thing, there are good and bad ones. Linear PSU of similar performance is usually much bulkier, heavier and expensive than an switching PSU.
The traditional EMI problems of SMPS have been reduced to excellent levels making them practical for high-end audio. Again, in good designs.

Dimonis 23rd July 2012 07:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ssanmor (Post 3100459)
You can get better performance with a regulated SMPS. is usually much bulkier, heavier and expensive than an switching PSU.

Don't think that a regulated SMPS will be cheaper than a linear!:D
And what's the purpose of the stabilization or linear , or SMPS ? All (almost ;) ) amplifiers have an excellent rejection of the supply ripple.:confused:

qusp 23rd July 2012 07:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dimonis (Post 3101976)
Don't think that a regulated SMPS will be cheaper than a linear!:D
And what's the purpose of the stabilization or linear , or SMPS ? All (almost ;) ) amplifiers have an excellent rejection of the supply ripple.:confused:

oh I think it will, if you take everything into account. to build an equivalent linear supply that is capable to not sag in the slightest on highest transients, you have a reasonable cost right there, then you have to build or buy a much larger chassis than needed if using SMPS as well, add in the shipping of the heavier parts and you would be surprised how close or even behind

Dimonis 23rd July 2012 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by qusp (Post 3101981)
oh I think it will, if you take everything into account. to build an equivalent linear supply that is capable to not sag in the slightest on highest transients, you have a reasonable cost right there, then you have to build or buy a much larger chassis than needed if using SMPS as well, add in the shipping of the heavier parts and you would be surprised how close or even behind

I agree , but i didn't mean any weight , shipping , heating , and other non electric properties :D
My opinion is that there is no need for regulated (stabilized) supply , neither lineer or switch. ;)


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