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-   -   Clipping indicator in a class D amp? (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/class-d/216335-clipping-indicator-class-d-amp.html)

ThyDntWntMusic 17th July 2012 01:48 AM

Clipping indicator in a class D amp?
 
Looking to build one of these for a car amplifier.

Power Amp Clipping Indicator

its a single channel, 1500watt amp, class D.

is there anything I need to be aware of? as its a single channel, I assume I only need one pair of diodes from the amplifier output into the circuit?

thanks!

ssanmor 17th July 2012 12:32 PM

In order to keep it simpler, you can only measure the difference between speaker output and one of the rails (as audio signals are symmetric in mean by nature it will provide a good indication).
In order to do so, you only need a couple of transistors and some resistors, plus a LED.

AP2 17th July 2012 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ssanmor (Post 3095278)
In order to keep it simpler, you can only measure the difference between speaker output and one of the rails (as audio signals are symmetric in mean by nature it will provide a good indication).
In order to do so, you only need a couple of transistors and some resistors, plus a LED.

the circuit complexity has a right, just because the signals are asymmetric in nature (not symmetrical)

Osvaldo de Banfield 17th July 2012 04:21 PM

I saw much time ago, a clip detector very easy to use, and understand. Place a transformer across the speaker, with a primary voltage about the maximum expected speaker voltage, and a variable resistor in series. In the secondary, place a neon lamp in series with a resistor of about 100K 1/2W. The lamp will glow when near saturation of amp. Example, if the maximum expected voltage is 24V peak, use a 220 or 110V /24V reversed wired (Low voltage secondary as the primary), and a variable resistor of, say, 1K. In the secondary, the lamp. Then place the amp near the maximum power, and adjust the pot to just bright in audio peaks. It has been used in some older non-expensive tape recorders as a level indicator prior to recording head saturation.

stoc005 17th July 2012 04:33 PM

Neon light?? Transformer?? Very old skool from the 60s approach.

Osvaldo de Banfield 17th July 2012 04:40 PM

Yes, agree. But, does it do its job? I know that this scheme is easy, non expensive and works fine.

ssanmor 17th July 2012 04:46 PM

Quote:

the circuit complexity has a right, just because the signals are asymmetric in nature (not symmetrical)
I said symmetrical in mean (will you see asymmetries in a blinking LED?) Otherwise the audio would have a DC component most likely.

qusp 17th July 2012 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ssanmor (Post 3095506)
I said symmetrical in mean (will you see asymmetries in a blinking LED?) Otherwise the audio would have a DC component most likely.

AP2, in case you have not heard this usage of mean, it means average

ssanmor 17th July 2012 05:54 PM

Thanks!, yes, perhaps "mean" can mean tough or other things in a different context: with "mean" I "mean" "average" :)

ThyDntWntMusic 18th July 2012 12:03 AM

so, ah, I should build the clipping indicator from that link?


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