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Class D Switching Power Amplifiers and Power D/A conversion

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Old 14th July 2012, 03:20 PM   #11
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Location: S.England
Yes, there is no problem in doing any of the things you want to do there.
First off, I would leave the exisitng jack on the PCB, there is no need to remove it and it is not panel mounting anyway.

You also do not need to solder any wires to this jack. Just get something like ebay item 270847396013 and cut the red & white rca plugs off the end. Plug the jack into the board. Viola, connection made, no soldering or messing about.

Now, this lead is 3ft long – obviously you won’t need it to be this long, so chop it down to a length you can use inside your new box.
Then wire this up to your 3.5mm jack from ebay. Connect this in parallel (using some of the left over cable) to a ” input jack such as ebay item 290366466539.

Note that the 3.5mm jack you’ve found on ebay has 5 pins and the ” jack I’ve shown you has 6 connections. More on this if you get stuck on which pins to wire up to.

Now I know that the ” jack I’ve pointed you to is stereo, but this does not matter for your guitar jack (in fact using a stereo jack will of course allow this input connection to also accept a stereo input source as well). Some thought is now needed on how to bridge the two input channels. A switch may be needed as mentioned above.

Does that make sense?

A

Last edited by underwurlde; 14th July 2012 at 03:31 PM.
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Old 19th July 2012, 09:41 AM   #12
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Default Anonymous1 and Underwurlde thank you for your valuable responses!

Quote:
Originally Posted by underwurlde View Post
Yes, there is no problem in doing any of the things you want to do there.
First off, I would leave the exisitng jack on the PCB, there is no need to remove it and it is not panel mounting anyway.

You also do not need to solder any wires to this jack. Just get something like ebay item 270847396013 and cut the red & white rca plugs off the end. Plug the jack into the board. Viola, connection made, no soldering or messing about.

Now, this lead is 3ft long obviously you wont need it to be this long, so chop it down to a length you can use inside your new box.
Then wire this up to your 3.5mm jack from ebay. Connect this in parallel (using some of the left over cable) to a input jack such as ebay item 290366466539.

Note that the 3.5mm jack youve found on ebay has 5 pins and the jack Ive shown you has 6 connections. More on this if you get stuck on which pins to wire up to.

Now I know that the jack Ive pointed you to is stereo, but this does not matter for your guitar jack (in fact using a stereo jack will of course allow this input connection to also accept a stereo input source as well). Some thought is now needed on how to bridge the two input channels. A switch may be needed as mentioned above.

Does that make sense?

A
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Old 19th July 2012, 10:29 AM   #13
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Join Date: Jul 2012
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Anonymous1 and Underwurlde thank you for your valuable responses!

Quote:
Originally Posted by underwurlde View Post

Just get something like ebay item 270847396013 and cut the red & white rca plugs off the end. Plug the jack into the board. Viola, connection made, no soldering or messing about.

Now, this lead is 3ft long obviously you wont need it to be this long, so chop it down to a length you can use inside your new box.
Then wire this up to your 3.5mm jack from ebay. Connect this in parallel (using some of the left over cable) to a input jack such as ebay item 290366466539.

Now I know that the jack Ive pointed you to is stereo, but this does not matter for your guitar jack (in fact using a stereo jack will of course allow this input connection to also accept a stereo input source as well). Some thought is now needed on how to bridge the two input channels. A switch may be needed as mentioned above.


A
I think that this is a fantastic way of accomplishing what I was thinking. I fear that it might be more then I can do right now. Maybe I will tackle this later on.

I think I will focus on finding the right 1/8" 3.5mm jack outlet that has threads on the shaft, so I can mount it in my enclosure.

I have found several on ebay and am a little confused on why they have different numbers of terminals. Some have three, some have five terminals. Also the different configurations. The one on my board has 5 terminals.

Obviously I don't need 50 of these, but here are a couple I am looking at

5 Terminals
50pcs,1/8" 3.5mm Female Phono Stereo Panel Phone Jack,2634 | eBay

3 Terminals
50 PCS 1/8" (3.5MM) FEMALE PCB MOUNT STEREO JACKS | eBay

1/8" stereo jack metal housing w/nut panel mount PN:502 5 pcs. | eBay

Do the 5 terminal or pin jacks sound better then the 3??? What is the advantage or disadvantage of each?
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Old 19th July 2012, 01:54 PM   #14
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The 5 terminals have two extra terminals that are in contact with the L/R positive terminals only when the jack is empty; when a plug is inserted the contacts open. This can be used on an audio input to short the inputs to ground to prevent floating inputs causing noise.

I would just go with the last link you posted. Be careful with the tabs on those, they break easily if bent too much.
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Old 19th July 2012, 01:58 PM   #15
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I don't know all the intricacies of guitar amp wiring, but you have both stereo and mono jacks- guitars usually (always?) use mono. Then you have jacks that automatically ground the input to kill noise when you pull the plug. That accounts for the extra terminals. The simplest mono jack will have two terminals, or even one, if it uses the panel connection as ground. The most complex stereo jack might have six or more terminals.
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Old 19th July 2012, 03:03 PM   #16
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Here Kitty, I just made you a patch cable you can plug right into the amp and then mount the other end on the chassis/panel. I have an extra 3.5mm jack you can have for a spare.

What do you plan on using for an enclosure? I have a couple small ones here that might work for you if you don't have one picked out yet.

I see your little project quickly racking up a big bill from all these small parts, so just trying to help you out.
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Old 19th July 2012, 03:03 PM   #17
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Thinking about it.... if your guitar jack is mono, changing it to a stereo jack with output signal wired to both the L & R channels then you won't need a switch on your amp to play sound out of both speakers.

Click the image to open in full size.

McFly!

Just a thought.

A
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Old 20th July 2012, 03:42 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by underwurlde View Post
Thinking about it.... if your guitar jack is mono, changing it to a stereo jack with output signal wired to both the L & R channels then you won't need a switch on your amp to play sound out of both speakers.

Click the image to open in full size.

McFly!

Just a thought.

A
Again thanks for the input, You guys are the best!!!

The Anonymous1 you are too sweet to make me one. However I need to make my own so I can learn. It does help just by visually seeing it, so thank you, thank you!!

Underworld...Are you saying changing out the mono jack on my guitar to a stereo jack. Or changing the mono jack to stereo jack on the amp itself.

I hope you are talking about the amp because I have an ukulele that I would like to plug in as well.

So how do I go about wiring the output to both L and R channels.


Finally....I was thinking of getting a 1/8" 3.5mm Y cable to split the signal to both inputs. Thoughts?

Thanks guys!

Kianna
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Old 20th July 2012, 05:23 AM   #19
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If you use a stereo 1/4" jack then it will keep the amp stereo as opposed to a mono jack shorting the L/R channels together. When you insert a mono 1/4" plug, the single positive signal contact will touch both L/R contacts in the jack so sound plays through both channels.

Yes, you can use a Y-cable by plugging the male end into the amp and then cut off the other ends and solder one to the 1/8" and the other to the 1/4". You could also just use just the 1/4" jack and then get a 1/4"-1/8" adapter.
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Old 20th July 2012, 08:38 AM   #20
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Quote:
When you insert a mono 1/4" plug, the single positive signal contact will touch both L/R contacts in the jack so sound plays through both channels.
This is a thought that flashed through my tiny brain, then I thought, hold on...

Stereo Jack plug at the top, Mono Jack plug at the bottom:
Click the image to open in full size.
1) Sleeve = Ground (GND)
2) Ring = Right channel
3) Tip = Left channel.
4) Insulating rings.

Notice that the Ring (2 - R channel) of a stereo jack plug aligns with the Sleeve (1 - Ground) of a mono jack plug. Hence when a mono jack plug is plugged into a stereo input jack socket the signal from the mono source is at the tip (3 - Left channel) and music appears from the Left speaker. However the Right channel (2 - Ring) now gets shorted to the sleeve and hence gets grounded and no music appears from the Right speaker.

Hence:
Quote:
Are you saying changing out the mono jack on my guitar to a stereo jack
.
Yep (if you can): Remove the mono jack plug from the guitar lead and replace it with a stereo jack plug. The screen of the cable from the guitar cable then goes to the sleeve (1 - Ground) of the new plug and the signal of the guitar cable wired to BOTH the Right channel (2 - Ring) and Left channel (3 - Tip) of the new plug. You've now shorted the Tip and the Ring together, in other words the Left channel and Right channel of the new Stereo Jack Plug is connected together.

Therefore when plugging this new stereo jack plug from your guitar cable into the Stereo jack socket on your new amplifier, music should play out of both speakers (all be it in mono).

Does that (still) make sense?

A
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