diyAudio

diyAudio (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/)
-   Class D (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/class-d/)
-   -   Simple 15-25W amp on 12VDC? (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/class-d/161162-simple-15-25w-amp-12vdc.html)

whammoed 12th February 2010 01:40 PM

Simple 15-25W amp on 12VDC?
 
I'm curious if there are any class D chips out there that allow for a simple design and can run on 12VDC and produce somewhere between 15 and 25 Watts? This will be powered by a PC power supply and does not have to be audiophile quality but would like it to sound as good as possible.

If no such Class D chip exists I was leaning towards using a TDA1554 (or perhaps the TDA8566 which is in the current product lineup). The Class D appeals to me due to lower heat and power consumption. Circuit doesn't have to be as simple as the one for TDA1554 but I need it to be inexpensive and easy to assemble.

The specs for the TA2020 look perfect for this but I was really wanting something simpler requiring fewer components.

theAnonymous1 12th February 2010 08:58 PM

Sorry, but "simple" and "Class-D" don't really go together; at least not in the same sense as a "simple" Class-AB chipamp (more to do with layout than component count).

To get 15-25W RMS from a 12V supply, you will need a fairly low impedance load. You can get that power range with a 4R load at about 10% distortion though.

The "simplest" Class-D chipamp I have built uses the TPA3122D2. It will need to be bridged to get the power you want though.

http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/class...ml#post1872915

Digital Amplifier Solutions - Analog-Input Class-D Speaker Amplifiers - TPA3122D2 - TI.com

whammoed 12th February 2010 11:32 PM

That's what I figured after taking a look at quite a few schematics for class D. Thanks for the response. It will help in my decision on what direction to take with this. I'd love to do Class D for this but Class A/B probably makes more sense for this application and price point.

bwaslo 12th February 2010 11:37 PM

Or you could buy one of a number of prebuilt Tripath based amps off ebay for about what the chip would cost you. At 4 ohms you might get close to 15W...

whammoed 12th February 2010 11:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bwaslo (Post 2083587)
Or you could buy one of a number of prebuilt Tripath based amps off ebay for about what the chip would cost you. At 4 ohms you might get close to 15W...

I still may go that route. I was looking to combine a few different applications onto one PCB for the sake of neatness and ease of wiring. I will be driving a 4ohm load and was definitely thinking of the absolute maximums when specifying 15-25Watts.

djk 14th February 2010 01:33 AM

25W at 4R is 28.28V peak-to-peak, a bit hard to get with a 12V supply without an inverter.

A/D/S made a bi-polar transistor amplifier with 25.3V peak-to-peak (20W/4R) with a bridged CFP output stage (with voltage gain) that ran on 13.8V (automotive 12V).

Eva 15th February 2010 06:37 PM

Check TDA1562Q. This IC is class AB/H and includes a voltage doubler, so efficiency is better than class AB, and 4 ohm output power is 3 to 4 times what the usual 12V class AB or D amps would produce.

whammoed 15th February 2010 07:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eva (Post 2086512)
Check TDA1562Q. This IC is class AB/H and includes a voltage doubler, so efficiency is better than class AB, and 4 ohm output power is 3 to 4 times what the usual 12V class AB or D amps would produce.


Interesting. Thanks!

Right now I'm leaning toward the TDA7376B simply because it comes in a multiwatt package which would be much easier to find heatsinks for. Is there an "off the shelf" heatsink available for the NXP chips like the TDA1562Q or TDA8566?

theAnonymous1 15th February 2010 07:58 PM

I have a TDA7370B I recently pulled from an old powered PC 2.1 speaker setup. It should give close to the same power/performance as the TDA7376B.

You can have it if you want it. Giving it away will save me from starting another project I don't need.

TDA7370B Datasheet

rx7mark 18th February 2010 07:13 PM

A 41hz AMP6 basic will do this from 12v.

See 41Hz Audio:AMP6-BASIC kit

Here is a quote from the web page:

"The output power is around 2x25W RMS maximum, into 4 ohms at 10% THD+N. Up to about 2X15W, the THD+N is below 0.1%. "

Mark


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:47 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio


Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2