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-   -   smps and ucd power consuption (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/class-d/141856-smps-ucd-power-consuption.html)

zigo3 6th April 2009 04:23 PM

smps and ucd power consuption
 
Hello

I'm planning to build a stereo ucd400 to use in biamp on the woofer of my old Canton ct1000, 4ohm, closed, 25cm woofer.
I was thinking to use an SMPS, like the coldamp sps80 (or sps80HV) or the new Hypex sps400.

I was thinking to use it or, in alternative, an old NAD 2200, but reading the data sheet I found "power consuption-770 W" :eek:.

Then I looked around for power consuption about sps80 or sps400 but I didn't find nothing.

Please somebody knows that?

thanks in advance

zigo3 6th April 2009 05:50 PM

consumption, not consuption...I forgot the M :D , please sorry

warmen 6th April 2009 06:42 PM

sps80

ssanmor 6th April 2009 07:02 PM

The consumption of the SPS80 with no signal is around 5W. The statement you are talking about, 770W, is supposedly referring to the max. power it can draw from the line at the max. rated output.
The SPS80 has regulated output so you can adjust the rails voltage of your modules so they don't dissipate the stated 8-9W with no signal. For example, if you don't need the full 400W at 4ohm, you can reduce the supply voltage to, say, +/-45 or +/-50V and save some watts of dissipation in the UcD's. This output voltage won't change regardless of whether you plug the PSU in your house or your friend's ;-)

zigo3 6th April 2009 10:45 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by ssanmor
The consumption of the SPS80 with no signal is around 5W. The statement you are talking about, 770W, is supposedly referring to the max. power it can draw from the line at the max. rated output.
The SPS80 has regulated output so you can adjust the rails voltage of your modules so they don't dissipate the stated 8-9W with no signal. For example, if you don't need the full 400W at 4ohm, you can reduce the supply voltage to, say, +/-45 or +/-50V and save some watts of dissipation in the UcD's. This output voltage won't change regardless of whether you plug the PSU in your house or your friend's ;-)

Thankyou very much.
Ah sure, NAD is not in class A.

A question: your SPS80 is sensible to input variations or there is a kind of survoltage rectifier?

ssanmor 7th April 2009 07:31 AM

As I said, it is fully regulated so it is not sensible to input variations (within the nominal ranges of 200-240V or 100-120V, depending on the input setting). It also has a surge arrester so peaks in the line are absorbed.
Once you set an output voltage (after letting it warm some seconds), it remains stable from no-load to full 800W continuous load within 2% approx in all the input range.
The potential problem with unregulated PSUs (linear or switching) is that if you set it at the max. allowable voltage of the amplifier (let's say, +/63V), then plug it in another mains plug with an abnormally high AC voltage (this happens from time to time), the output voltage will also be higher, frying or, in the best of cases, protecting the amplifier module/s.

zigo3 7th April 2009 07:52 AM

Thankyou very much ssanmor

by the way UCD400 "shouts down when the rail exceed 68V" (datasheet): then regulate 63V with 220V input should be a good compromise.

Please, I have read in your price page http://www.coldamp.com/opencms/openc...ist/index.html that sps80 HV is rated >1000W instead of the >800W of sps80, it means that higher V out means more potential power?

I think that switching both on 60V, for example, they produce the same power, I'm correct?


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