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-   -   Tripath 300W for real? (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/class-d/133724-tripath-300w-real.html)

taxtelle 24th November 2008 10:43 AM

Tripath 300W for real?
 
I'm considering putting together one of the 41Hz kits. I've searched the forum, but I've found conflicting information. So here are my questions:

Power: The site claims up to 300W per channel for a couple of their amps (AMP2, Truepath, etc.). Do these little circuits really deliver that much power with the appropriate transformer, or is this hype?

Sound quality: Some posts claim that the class T's deliver "audiophile" quality. Others say that you shouldn't expect these circuits to deliver much in terms of sound quality. I'm really just looking for something that will drive a couple of homebrew 2 way bookshelf speakers (Parts Express Dayton projects) with sound quality at least approaching halfway decent commercial amplifiers at somewhere around 85 to 90 dB. Will any of these Tripaths fit the bill?

I have built valve and solid state class A guitar amps. But I like the idea of high efficiency audio amp that will fill a small room and doesn't put out a lot of heat. But these circuits seem awfully tiny to deliver the power/fidelity claimed. What's the real story?

col 24th November 2008 11:38 AM

41hz amp10 should sort you out.

I run an 4 channel amp9-basic with a SMPS, heaps of very clean power.

http://pix.minirig.org.au/main.php?g2_itemId=303

col.

Havoc08 24th November 2008 11:45 AM

I have built 2 amp9, a amp10b and several amp32 and amp10b fits your description.

You could also consider biamping with 1 amp9.

The sound is very warm and detailed and I especially like the very dark background and wide soundstage on these amps.

I have not tested the wattage rating as I don't know how nor have the equipment, but the amp32 for example is rated at approximately 2x15 watts at 4ohm 0,01%THD as far as I remember, and it plays fairly loud (80% of what you would need on 85-90dB speakers and enough for "normal" use) although being "thumb-size".

So I'm quite confident that amp10b or 9b (@24v or so) would give you plenty of undistorted power.


Good luck with your project (expecting pictures ;) )

kristleifur 24th November 2008 12:46 PM

Re: Tripath 300W for real?
 
Quote:

Originally posted by taxtelle
Do these little circuits really deliver that much power with the appropriate transformer, or is this hype?

Others say that you shouldn't expect these circuits to deliver much in terms of sound quality.

... these circuits seem awfully tiny to deliver the power/fidelity claimed. What's the real story?

They work! Promise.

Part of the reason they're so outlandishly small, I guess, is that transistors are more effective when they're completely off or completely on - there's less waste heat. Class D amps utilize this. You end up with the same power at the speakers, but much less heat escaping from the amp. That's how you get them to be so small.

It's the same principle as with power supplies. Remember how power bricks from 10-20 years back were large, heavy and hot? And now things like laptop power supplies are small, light and cool? It's the same principle, and with some clever design the sound quality is also excellent.

If you're sceptical, build an an Amp6-BASIC or try to find a T-Amp to listen to. (The T-Amp is severely handicapped out of the box though.)

Havoc08 24th November 2008 01:45 PM

I agree with kristleifur.

I would like to say, though, that in my oppinion you get much better SQ with the amp9 than the amp3/amp6 and it's not that expensive compared to the two minis.
I haven't listened to the amp6, only several amp32's and compared to the amp32, the amp9 is more relaxed, more "musical" and has better dynamics.

And then you can bi-amp and run very low impedances also.

In my ears the amp9 i very, very good compared to its cost and broad useability.

kristleifur 24th November 2008 02:02 PM

Yes, I think I can second the Amp9 recommendation. Or at least not oppose it - I haven't built one myself, but it's in the cards.

taxtelle 25th November 2008 11:52 AM

Thank you all so very much. You have been extremely helpful and gracious. I expected a few "search the forum" replies.

It looks like the AMP10 for me since it has the onboard PS and I don't have to worry about screwing up the bi-amp. The forum seems to like the Antek 3222 trannie for amp10, so I will go with that. Once again, sincere thanks for your help. I will not hesitate to come back if (when) I run into a snag.

kristleifur 25th November 2008 12:37 PM

Also keep the 41Hz.com forums in mind - they aren't perfect, but there's a lot of concentrated information and experienced builders there. Worth an additional visit if there's trouble.

You're probably going to have some component value questions w.r.t. setting feedback and suchlike, though I don't envision you encountering much trouble given your experience.

luka 25th November 2008 11:33 PM

Re: Tripath 300W for real?
 
Quote:

Originally posted by taxtelle

Power: The site claims up to 300W per channel for a couple of their amps (AMP2, Truepath, etc.). Do these little circuits really deliver that much power with the appropriate transformer, or is this hype?

Sound quality: Some posts claim that the class T's deliver "audiophile" quality. Others say that you shouldn't expect these circuits to deliver much in terms of sound quality. Will any of these Tripaths fit the bill?

I have built valve and solid state class A guitar amps. But I like the idea of high efficiency audio amp that will fill a small room and doesn't put out a lot of heat. But these circuits seem awfully tiny to deliver the power/fidelity claimed. What's the real story?

oooo yeeeeeeeaaaaa, yes it does, amp2, you can find my build here, +/- 60v, into 4R ~400w, I did drive 2R too, not full tilt of cource

Sound from them is outstanding, fullrange with no problems...I am no expert on SQ but sound was really nice, well it still is :D

Real story? they can if you would ask me...

ArjenShenzhen 26th November 2008 12:51 AM

power amps
 
Hi there Taxtelle,

Class D amplifiers are very suitable for high power, as they are very efficient, using PWM to switch mosfets on or off, Mosfets are very good at this, and can handle enormous currents.

as soon as you have a good driver circuitry, you can simply select a powerfull and fast switching mosfet, and this way create an amplifier that can go well over 500 watts.

Some smart designers have made over one kilowatt amps with the TA3020, and there are others like Hypex, Fumac with his MHZ class D and many more to choose from.

Greetings,

Arjen Helder


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